2021-2022 Undergraduate Bulletin 
    
    Oct 06, 2022  
2021-2022 Undergraduate Bulletin [Archived Bulletin]

Courses


 
  
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    EDU 1250 - Educational Psychology


    Goals: To develop a working knowledge of various principles and theories based in the discipline of psychology, for example, theories of cognitive, social, and emotional development and the practical application of these principles and theories to the teaching/learning process.

    Content: Survey theories of learning, motivation, and intelligence; theories of cognitive, social, and emotional development; and, influences of social and cultural background on development and learning. Learn about assessment and evaluation and the theoretical bases for instructional models. Conduct a case study analysis of a K-12 student.

    Taught: Fall and spring terms

    Corequisite: Concurrent registration in EDU 1150 - Schools and Society if pursuing a teaching license

    Credits: 4

  
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    EDU 3260 - Theory to Practice (with Lab)


    Goals: This is an introductory methods class in which students will apply theories of early adolescent development, learning, instruction, and assessment to classroom situations.

    Content: Analysis of teaching and learning instructional theory; structuring and managing the learning environment; strategies for assessing learning; designing developmentally appropriate learning opportunities to incorporate different approaches to learning, learning styles, and multiple intelligences; and strategies for culturally responsive instruction. Includes a 20-hour guided clinical experience with middle school students.

    Taught: Fall and spring terms

    Prerequisites: EDU 1150 and EDU 1250

    Corequisite: GED 7801 if pursuing a teaching license

    Note: Students must concurrently register for a lecture and a corresponding 0-credit lab section of this course.

    The lab consists of a 15-hour clinical in a local school. Students who have transferred in the equivalent course content without clinical experience should see the Department Chair to coordinate enrollment in a 1-credit Independent Study to earn the course equivalent.

    Credits: 4

  
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    EDU 3500 - Diversity and Education (with Lab)


    Goals: Understand the impact of diversity in the classroom: race, culture and ethnicity, class, gender, disability, language, and sexual orientation. Explore nature, causes, and effects of prejudice. Experience instructional methods that enhance the school success of all children. Approved by the Minnesota Department of Education as satisfying the Education 521 Human Relations requirement.

    Content: Students will examine how students’ culture, religion, race, gender, class and abilities, as well as their interactions with teachers and peers, play important roles in shaping their achievement, adjustment and identity in schools; study how our personal identities and cultural histories of race, class, gender, ability, and sexuality affect our teaching philosophies, and explore how our personal values and beliefs shape our teaching practices; investigate the popular myths and histories we have learned in our own schooling, families, and social experiences and survey how the forms of truth and fiction portrayed by popular sources such as school textbooks and media shape our values and beliefs; identify the implications of inclusive and non-inclusive education, specifically looking at ways to create a positive classroom climate that enhances the academic and social experiences of all students.

    Taught: Fall and spring terms

    Prerequisites: EDU 1150 and EDU 1250

    Note: Students must concurrently register for a lecture and a corresponding 0-credit lab section of this course.

    The lab consists of a 20-hour required clinical in a local school. Students who have transferred in the equivalent course content without clinical experience should see the Department Chair to coordinate enrollment in a 1-credit Independent Study to earn the course equivalent.

    Credits: 4

  
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    EDU 3660 - Crucial Issues in Education


    Goals: To research and critically examine a particular set of issues connected with the profession of education.

    Content: Topics will vary from year to year. Recent topics have included education and the media, immigrant and refugee students in U.S. schools, the achievement gap, educational policy.

    Taught: Winter term

    Credits: 4

  
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    EDUC 7601 - Introduction to Adult Education


    This course familiarizes teachers with the field of adult education and its major components. This course explores the theoretical underpinnings of adult learning and how these take shape In today’s adult education classrooms. The course includes an emphasis on the skills needed for adults to transition to deeper engagement within their communities, high school completion, and increasing achievement in careers and post-secondary settings. Sections of the course concentrate on many of the essential components of adult basic learning, including effective communication, numeracy, and literacy.

    Credits: 4

  
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    EDUC 7636 - Course Design for Adult Education Classes


    Adult learners come to educational programs for a variety of reasons: some need basic skills or English for the workplace; some are seeking a GED/high school equivalency; others plan to study at a community college or university. In this course, participants explore the principles of needs assessment and course design and learn tools to develop courses tailored to students’ language and learning needs. They create curricula and materials for use in their own programs that prepare adults for the demands of the 21st century.

    Credits: 2

  
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    EDUC 7638 - Assessment in Adult Education


    This course addresses the entrance and exit criteria for adult education and ESL programs and provides guidance on how to evaluate student progress. The politics of testing and assessment are explored as well. Participants learn how to conduct valid and reliable formal and informal assessments of adult learners, and they develop authentic assessment tools for academic and workplace settings.

    Credits: 2

  
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    EDUC 7690 - ABE Field Experience


    Students meet individually with their faculty advisor to review portfolio requirements (as detailed in the syllabus) and provide documentation of hours in adult classrooms.

    Credits: 0

  
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    ENG 1100 - English Composition from Multiple Linguistic Perspectives


    Goals: As preparation for FYW 1120, the course will help international students develop the writing skills necessary for college-level course work.

    Content: Focus on writing and rewriting with an emphasis on the particular needs of non-native speakers of English.

    Taught: Annually

    Credits: 4

  
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    ENG 1200 - Introduction to English Studies


    Goals: To interpret texts in relation to historical, cultural, and intellectual contexts and value systems; to identify broader historical, cultural, and intellectual movements that shape and are shaped by texts; and to recognize textual production and consumption as ethical, organizational, and cultural practices. 

    Content: This is a topics course. Each of the distinct topic offerings engages in a survey of literary, cultural, and rhetorical texts that will provide students with core knowledge and skills for the discipline and more broadly vital for success at and beyond Hamline. Course topics may include studies of periods and movements; studies of texts comparatively and thematically, situated in their respective historical and cultural contexts; studies of genres and modes of academic, professional, and public communications; and studies of literary, cultural, and rhetorical movements.

     A student may register for this course more than once for different topics.

    Taught: Fall and spring

    Credits: 4

  
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    ENG 1800 - Introduction to Professional Writing and Rhetoric


    Goals: To survey common genres and audiences of professional writing in their organizational, cultural, and ethical contexts. To introduce  fundamental principles of rhetorical theory and how they can be applied to the analysis and production of professional communication.

    Content: Genres and emphasis may vary from semester to semester. Possible genres include: proposals, reports, infographics, memos, apologies, user and feasibility testing, and job application materials. Students will focus on the rhetorical, ethical, technological, legal, and pragmatic elements of producing professional writing for diverse audiences and purposes.

    Taught: Fall and spring

    Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and FYW 1120 or its equivalent

    Credits: 4

  
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    ENG 1900 - Introduction to Literature and Criticism


    Goals: To introduce readers to a critical relationship with literary form that is the foundation of the discipline of English. The course investigates literature and writing as a site of cultural production and consumption, leading to a self-reflexive development of critical thinking through the close reading of texts in different genres. Students acquire critical terminology and practice interpretive strategies.

    Content: Close reading of and writing about selected works from various cultures, genres, and periods.

    Taught: Fall and spring

    Prerequisite: FYW 1120 or its equivalent, or concurrent registration

    Credits: 4

  
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    ENG 3020 - Literary and Cultural Theory


    Goals: To introduce students to theoretical approaches to texts and to the practical applications of literary theory. Students should take this gateway course in the sophomore year in conjunction with declaring a major/minor. This course builds on the learning experiences introduced in FYW 1120, the surveys, and ENG 1900: Introduction to Literature and Criticism and prepares students for success in 3000-level writing and literature courses and the senior seminar. Required for many 3000-level courses. 

    Content: Reading and discussing representative 20th and 21st-century critical approaches to the study and understanding of written texts and producing analytical essays that apply critical methods to selected texts.

    Taught: Fall and spring

    Prerequisite: ENG 1200 or ENG 1800

    Note: The English department recommends that students complete ENG 1900 before enrolling in this course. This course is not recommended for first year students.

    Credits: 4

  
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    ENG 3100 - Introduction to African-American Studies


    Goals: To develop an understanding of several key issues in African American Studies emphasizing close textual reading and analysis. Additionally, students participate in academic service learning to synthesize textual and experiential learning.

    Content: The course materials will focus on critical readings about construction of race as a concept; intersections of race, class and gender; afrocentrism; pan-africanism; diasporic connections; nationalism; religious dimension; literary theory and popular culture.

    Prerequisite: FYW 1120 or equivalent first-year writing course

    Credits: 4

  
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    ENG 3190 - Introduction to Linguistics


    Goals: To examine the scientific study of language and language analysis.

    Content: Analysis of language in terms of phonetics and phonology (sounds), morphology (word formation), semantics (the meaning system), syntax (sentences and their structure), and language change. Discussion of the relationship between language and neurology, psychology, society, and culture.

    Taught: Alternate years

    Prerequisite: FYW 1120 or its equivalent

    Note: The English department recommends that students take ENG 3020 before taking this course.

    Credits: 4

  
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    ENG 3320 - Fundamentals of Journalism


    Goals: To develop skills in writing for mass media.

    Content: Techniques and practice of news, feature, and interpretive reporting combined with reading and discussion of principles and ethics of journalism.

    Taught: Annually

    Prerequisite: FYW 1120 or its equivalent

    Credits: 4

  
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    ENG 3330 - Topics in Journalism


    Goals: To explore special topics in news reporting and writing.

    Content: Build on basic writing techniques and formats with concentration on interviewing, fact gathering, editing, and design. Exposure to print, broadcast, or online media. Topics vary. Check section title and description.

    A student may register for this course more than once for different topics.

    Taught: Annually

    Prerequisite: FYW 1120 or its equivalent

    Note: The English department recommends that students take ENG 3320 before taking this course.

    Credits: 4

  
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    ENG 3370 - Topics in Professional Writing


    Goals: An intensive study in a particular area of professional writing.

    Content: Based on the principles and practices of professional writing and rhetoric, this course requires that students write for multiple, complex audiences and purposes. Topics vary. Check section title and description. Examples include “technical writing,” “usability and user advocacy,” “games writing,” “writing for social justice,” and “community writing.”

    A student may register for this course more than once for different topics.

    Taught: Annually

    Note: The English department recommends that students take ENG 1800 before taking this course.

    Credits: 4

  
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    ENG 3450 - Studies in Literatures Across Cultures


    Goals: A critical study of a specific topic in world literature.

    Content: Intensive analysis of texts in their cultural contexts. Topics vary from year to year. Recent examples: passages to India, the empire writes back, Harlem renaissance, pan-African oratory, 20th-century Irish literature.

    A student may register for this course more than once for different topics.

    Taught: Annually

    Note: The English department recommends that students take ENG 1900 and ENG 3020 before taking this course.

    Credits: 4

  
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    ENG 3510 - Studies in a Single Author


    Goals: A critical study of a specific author.

    Content: Intensive analysis of texts in their cultural contexts. Topics vary from year to year. Examples include Toni Morrison, James Baldwin, Edmund Spenser, John Milton.

    A student may register for this course more than once for different topics.

    Taught: Occasionally

    Note: The English department recommends that students take ENG 1900 and ENG 3020 before taking this course.

    Credits: 4

  
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    ENG 3530 - Studies in British Literatures


    Goals: A critical study of a specific topic in British literature.

    Content: Intensive analysis of texts in their cultural contexts. Topics vary from year to year. Recent examples: medieval lowlife, Arthurian legends, Renaissance drama, Romantic poetry, Victorian novel, modernism, contemporary novel.

    A student may register for this course more than once for different topics.

    Taught: Annually

    Note: The English department recommends that students take ENG 1900 and ENG 3020 before taking this course.

    Credits: 4

  
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    ENG 3540 - Studies in American Literatures


    Goals: A critical study of a specific topic or period in American literature.

    Content: Intensive analysis of texts in their cultural contexts. Topics vary from year to year. Recent examples: American Literature of Landscape and Nature; Walt Whitman and Modern American Poetry; Beats, Bop, and the Status Quo; Comedy and Postmodernism; Women’s Bildungsroman and Kunstlerroman; Science and Literature; Reading Whiteness; Reading Masculinities; Dramas of Race.

    A student may register for this course more than once for different topics.

    Taught: Annually

    Note: The English department recommends that students take ENG 1900 and ENG 3020 before taking this course.

    Credits: 4

  
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    ENG 3570 - Women and Literature


    Goals: To understand women writers’ representations in literature by closely examining their work in historical and cultural contexts through the theory and practice of feminist criticism.

    Content: Focus varies. Recent examples: writers of color, wandering women, black women writers.

    A student may register for this class more than once for different topics.

    Taught: Alternate years

    Prerequisite: ENG 1900 or WSTD 1010 or GLOB 1910

    Credits: 4

  
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    ENG 3710 - Critical Digital Media Theory


    Goals: To have students intervene in current scholarly debates on how digital media has transformed, or should transform, our conceptions of politics, communication, art, law, and life.

    Content: Whatever 21st century technologies – or human reactions to them – are most scandalous or interesting when the class meets, which are studied via current scholarship in the digital humanities, drawing primarily from the traditions of rhetoric, media, and cultural theory.

    Taught: Once per year

    Prerequisite: FYW 1120 or its equivalent

    Credits: 4

  
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    ENG 3720 - Teaching Writing: Theory and Practice


    Goals: To learn a range of theories of how writing works and how it is best learned, to apply these theories to develop informed writing processes and teaching practices, and to hone advanced skills in expository and argumentative writing and research.

    Content: Theories of composition and writing pedagogy.

    Taught: Annually in spring semester

    Prerequisite: FYW 1120 or its equivalent

    Credits: 4

  
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    ENG 5960 - Senior Seminar


    Goals: This course provides the capstone experience in the major. The goal of this course is to practice and polish previously learned skills and experiences to produce a textual analysis of article length and quality. This essay marks the student’s entrance into the profession as a participant in an on-going and dynamic conversation about specific works and the discipline as a whole.

    Content: Varies from year to year. Recent examples: Twice-Told Tales; Salman Rushdie and Transnationalism; There is No Place Like Home: Literature of Exile; Slavery, Women and the Literary Imagination; Narratives of National Trauma; Propaganda and the Literature of Commitment; 20th Century Drama; Hard-Boiled Fiction; Hawthorne and “a Mob of Scribbling Women”; Renaissance Self-Fashioning; American Melancholy: Readings of Race, Sexuality and Performance Culture; Speculative Fiction and Now.

    Taught: Annually

    Prerequisites: ENG 3020, at least one 3000-level literature course, and instructor permission. Grade of C- or better required for said courses.

    Credits: 4

  
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    ESL 7620 - TEFL Certificate Course


    Live your dream, teach overseas!

    Experience another culture while living and working overseas after earning a Teaching English as a Foreign Language (TEFL) certificate. Gain hands-on experience, spending over 40 hours teaching, observing, and giving feedback in a classroom with English language learners. Our nationally recognized program was established in 1991 and over 1,200 Hamline graduates have taught in more than 40 countries worldwide. Join them!

    Note: Application is required for participation in this program. Please visit www.hamline.edu/tefl for course details and an online application.

    Credits: 8

  
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    ESL 7621 - TEFL Certificate Part I


    Through an interactive hands-on approach, discover the principles and practices of teaching English as a foreign language. Explore factors that affect second language acquisition. Learn how to create meaningful, contextualized lessons addressing language skills, grammar, vocabulary and pronunciation for adults learning English as a foreign language.

    Note: Application is required for participation in this program. Please visit www.hamline.edu/tefl for course details and an online application.

    Credits: 4

  
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    ESL 7622 - TEFL Certificate Part II


    Through an interactive hands-on approach, discover the principles and practices of teaching English as a foreign language. Explore the place of culture in learning; develop skills for assessing learning and giving feedback. In this course you apply what you have learned in this class and TEFL Part I as you practice teaching English in community programs.

    Note: Application is required for participation in this program. Please visit www.hamline.edu/tefl for course details and an online application.

    Credits: 4

  
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    ESL 7631 - Introduction to the Adult ESL Learner: Developing Reading and Writing Skills


    This course provides an introduction to second language acquisition theory, English as a Second Language (ESL) literacy development, and issues of acculturation for adult English language learners in all Adult Basic Education (ABE) classrooms. Effective ESL instruction for adults stems from understanding of the second language learning process as well as the cultural and political context for learning. This course provides an overview of current theory and practice in teaching reading and writing to adults at all proficiency levels. This course is intended for ESL instructors and ABE instructors in all content areas, where in many programs, nearly 5O% of ABE learners have a first language other than English.

    Credits: 2

  
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    ESL 7753 - Testing and Evaluation of English Language Learners


    Examine the complex issues of assessment, testing, and evaluation of ELLs, in both ESL and mainstream classrooms.

    Develop an understanding of the policies, procedures and instruments used in assessing English language proficiency and the academic competency of ELLs. Learn how to use appropriate assessment to improve student performance and how to advocate for students in testing situations. Target audience: educators K-12.

    Credits: 2

  
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    ESL 7770 - Critical Praxis in TESOL


    The goals of this course are to foster the dispositions, as well as provide teacher candidates with the knowledge and skills needed in order to critically engage in the field of TESOL.

    Components of this course include advocacy, policy, linguistically and culturally sustaining pedagogies, trauma-informed practices, critical issues in the field, immigration, and dual exceptionality.

    Taught: Fall

    Credits: 4

  
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    ESL 7775 - ESL Methods Part I


    Goals: To introduce students to the history, theory, pedagogy, and management of teaching second-language learners in K-12. This course provides ESL candidates with a foundation in best practice literacy instruction for K-12 students. First in a two-course sequence.

    Content: The nature of literacy in a second language; research on teaching and learning in these areas; and the motivation, engagement, and management of K-12 students. This course includes 30 hours of clinical experience outside of scheduled class time - dates, times, and school sites to be determined. This is a graduate level course with graduate level expectations.

    Taught: Fall term

    Prerequisite: EDU 3260/GED 7867 - Theory to Practice (grade of B- or higher) or concurrent enrollment; Undergraduate students must be admitted to the Teacher Education Program.

    Credits: 4

  
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    ESL 7776 - ESL Methods Part II


    Goals: To allow teacher candidates to practice and to demonstrate competence with effective assessment and teaching methodology within K-12 ESL classrooms. Second in a two-course sequence.

    Content: Planning curriculum that incorporates national, state and local standards; implementing a variety of instructional strategies to address the needs of diverse learners; using and implementing formative and summative assessments. This course includes 30 hours of clinical experience outside of scheduled class time - dates, times, and school sites to be determined.

    Prerequisite: For K-12 ESL licensure candidates - ESL 7775 with a grade of B- or better

    Credits: 4

  
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    ESL 8100 - Linguistics for Language Teachers


    This is a broad, applied introduction to the study of language including morphology (word forms), syntax (sentence structure), semantics (meaning), and phonetics/phonology (pronunciation), as well as the social and cognitive dimensions of language. Study the application of linguistic skills to language instruction and the use of technology in teaching, in addition to an introduction to graduate-level research and Internet skills in a two-hour in-class library orientation.

    Target audience: K-Adult ESL and bilingual/bicultural teachers.

    Credits: 4

  
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    ESL 8110 - Language and Society


    Focus on the varieties of language and how they reflect social patterns. Explore the importance of language in all our interactions.

    Examine the social nature of language, and how language reflects social situations. Study the issues of language and social class, ethnic group, and gender, as well as topics in language and nationality, language and geography, and the social nature of writing. Learn to pay particular attention to the social-linguistic situations of second language learners (i.e., those who are not native speakers of a socially dominant language or dialect) as well as the sociolinguistics of language in the classroom.

    Target audience: language arts, modern language, and ESL teachers; educators; K-adult; administrators.

    Credits: 4

  
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    ESL 8120 - Pedagogical Grammar and Discourse


    An overview of English grammar designed for teachers of ESL grades K-12. Develop an understanding of the basics of English grammar both descriptively and pedagogically, particularly in areas that cause difficulties for learners of English as a Second Language. Improve your skills at error analysis and your ability to effectively incorporate grammar instruction into your classroom in a way that is meaningful and interesting to your learners.

    NOTE: Should be taken after or concurrently with a linguistics course.

    Credits: 4

  
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    ESL 8130 - Exploring Learner Language and Second Language Acquisition


    How do students learn a second language? Examine the factors that affect how languages are learned—age, environment, academic background, motivation, and developmental processes. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the language learning process and being able to communicate this process to administrators, teachers, and parents. Current research issues will also be addressed, with opportunities for teachers to apply theory to practice.

    NOTE: Should be taken after or concurrently with a linguistics course.

    Credits: 4

  
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    ESL 8150 - Advanced Linguistic Analysis


    Using naturally occurring linguistic data from the first languages that ESL practitioners encounter in Minnesota (e.g. Spanish, Hmong and Somali), this course will provide ESL practitioners with a solid understanding of topics in syntax, semantics and pragmatics. The emphasis will be on recognizing pattern and structure (including linguistic universals) and relating this knowledge to the language learning needs of ESL students.

    Credits: 3

  
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    ESL 8160 - Phonetics and Phonology


    Help English language learners attain intelligible pronunciation. This course addresses areas of phonetics and phonology that ESL professionals need to know in order to assess and respond to learner needs. Issues of age, motivation, and context as they relate to pronunciation are discussed. Ideas for integrating pronunciation instruction into various curricula are included as well. The needs of both children and adults are addressed.

    Credits: 2

  
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    ESTD 1100 - Introduction to Environmental Studies


    Goals: To introduce students to the study of interactions between humans and the environment from an interdisciplinary perspective; to expose students to multiple viewpoints on environmental issues; to acquaint students with internship opportunities in environmental studies.

    Taught: Spring semester

    Credits: 4

  
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    ESTD 1500 - Planetary Home Care Manual


    Crosslisted: Also listed as ANTH 1500

    Goals: This course considers the conditions that make it possible for people – and societies, and our more-than-human neighbors – to live together on Earth in the longer term. Surveying the conditions of global crises such as climate change and environmental injustices, as well as exploring how those crises make us feel and treat each other, our readings, discussions, and in-class collaborative projects help us understand what it will take to care for the Earth as home as we move together into the future.

    Content: We explore socio-cultural, economic, and political relationships from the perspectives of Anthropology and Environmental Studies to better understand how we have arrived, globally, at profound disparities in wealth, health, life expectancy, population density, and access to opportunity and hope. In contrast, we explore global grocery chains and land commons projects to understand how people are rebuilding these systems, and to practice creating and sharing instructions for “planetary home care.” Drawing broadly on contemporary literature from geography, economics, political science, rural sociology, anthropology, and Afro- and Indigenous futurisms, this course helps prepare students to grapple with some of the more challenging issues of our post-colonial world, with its global division of labor, cultures of consumption-as-self-soothing, differential poverty and privilege, intellectual property battles, increasing systemic instabilities in the face of climate crisis and pandemics, and social responses to global connectivity. Course comes with Planetary playlist.

    Credits: 4

  
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    ESTD 1850 - Campus Sustainability


    Goals: Students focus on problem-based, community-engaged action research projects around sustainability topics, such as: campus waste and nutrient flows and energy and transportation systems, and the development of outdoor classroom spaces, programming, and research (for example at the stormwater pond at the Pierce Butler and Snelling intersection, and at the Hamline Learning Lawn).

    Content: Conducting research is a major function of many colleges and universities. By researching sustainability issues, higher education institutions can continue to help the world understand sustainability challenges and develop new technologies, strategies, and approaches to address those challenges. As individuals and groups, we can use sustainability research to learn what’s happening in the world around us, and to assess how our interventions are working. College campuses provide wonderful real-world classrooms for actively exploring how to measure and improve the sustainability of the various processes that support our everyday lives. Students that actively participate in making their campuses more sustainable are well prepared to continue that work in their careers and communities after graduation. In this course, students learn how to frame, develop, and explore environmental questions, conducting on-campus group research projects and field-trip based field study.

    Taught: Spring

    Note: This course may be repeated and can also be taken as ESTD 3850 for 4 credits. ESTD 1850 meets every other week, while ESTD 3850 meets every week. Students may earn up to 8 credits across ESTD 1850 and 3850.

    Credits: 2

  
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    ESTD 3330 - Feeding a Crowd


    Goals: To explore theories and methods of studying society-environment dynamics and to become comfortable using these theories and methods in community-engaged contexts, via the topic of the contemporary food movement. We investigate processes of collaborative adaptive co-management of commonly shared environmental resources and benefits, like land and water, and document these processes drawing on social practice art methods and platforms. 

    Content: We use the public practice of sharing meals between local youth and elders engaged in food movement work, and focus on civil rights and environmental justice themes in this work, along with the representation of these practices and themes in public discourse, social media, and shared spectacles. Each year, we focus on two community case studies, documenting these case studies along with community partners through the Eating Together podcast and platforms of the community’s choice, and studying reparative practices in urban agriculture and community nourishment.

    Taught: Spring term

    Credits: 4

  
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    ESTD 3850 - Campus Sustainability


    Goals: Students focus on problem-based, community-engaged action research projects around sustainability topics, such as: campus waste and nutrient flows and energy and transportation systems, and the development of outdoor classroom spaces, programming, and research (for example at the stormwater pond at the Pierce Butler and Snelling intersection, and at the Hamline Learning Lawn). 

    This course also helps prepare students to work in the Sustainability Resource Center and/or to connect internship activities with academic approaches to knowledge and community engagement, sharing different ways to explore environments and share the resulting observations with communities who would be interested. If you are planning an internship or community-engaged research project, or if you’d like to think about how to build your resume and academic record by connecting your interests and your internship activities, consider how to connect your interests to the course projects in ways that will be helpful for you! 

    Content: Conducting research is a major function of many colleges and universities. By researching sustainability issues, higher education institutions can continue to help the world understand sustainability challenges and develop new technologies, strategies, and approaches to address those challenges. As individuals and groups, we can use sustainability research to learn what’s happening in the world around us, and to assess how our interventions are working. College campuses provide wonderful real-world classrooms for actively exploring how to measure and improve the sustainability of the various processes that support our everyday lives. Students that actively participate in making their campuses more sustainable are well prepared to continue that work in their careers and communities after graduation. In this course, students learn how to frame, develop, and explore environmental questions, conducting on-campus group research projects and field-trip based field study. 

    Taught: Spring

    Prerequisite: ESTD 1100 or ESTD 1500

    Note: This course may be repeated and can also be taken as ESTD 1850 for 2 credits. Students may earn up to 8 credits across ESTD 1850 and 3850.

    Credits: 4

  
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    ESTD 3950 - Junior Seminar for Practicing Studying Environments


    Goals: To study environments from interdisciplinary perspectives; to explore environmental topics through a mix of lectures, individual and group projects, and class discussion.

    Content: Highlighting approaches from the interdisciplinary tracks in Environmental Studies, this seminar will provide students with individual and group experience analyzing environmental issues through practice using multiple methodologies and ways of understanding environments. Students in the junior seminar will discuss selected interdisciplinary topics in environmental studies in preparation for the development of senior research topics. Students collaborate with each other to analyze readings on environmental topics of local and global significance, develop a project proposal, write a literature review, present a seminar, carry out a group project on campus, and submit a proposal for further work. Students are strongly encouraged to build connections between this course and their internship.

    Taught: Annually

    Prerequisite: ESTD 1100 or instructor permission

    Credits: 4

  
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    ESTD 5950 - Senior Seminar: Problem Solving in Environmental Studies


    Goals: To cultivate the competencies needed to address environmental problems. These competencies include working in groups, discussion and presentation skills, writing skills, understanding multiple viewpoints, and analyzing and presenting conflicting information.

    Taught: Annually, fall semester.

    Prerequisites: ESTD 1100, ESTD 1500, BIOL 1130, and one course in general statistics

    Credits: 4

  
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    EXSC 1500 - Exploring Exercise Science


    Goals: This class is for first and second year students to introduce them to the field of exercise science. They will learn scientific practices, how to review and understand research in the field, foundational concepts to exercise science, and practice skills in preparation for internships and graduate school.

    Content: Students will be asked to read and discuss both qualitative and quantitative research that helps to shape the field of exercise science, including health behavior practices, exercise testing, training for various populations, the health/wellness industry, and more. Students will learn about the various fields and careers students can pursue with an exercise degree, as well as the wide variety of practice settings available along the continuum of healthcare.

    Credits: 4

  
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    EXSC 3010 - Motor Control and Learning


    Goals: To provide students with an introduction and foundational understanding of motor behavior and control of human movement.

    Content: Specifically, this course focuses on the concepts and principles of coordination, the control of movement, and the development of skilled motor action. Topics include fundamental movement activities; movement control processes; acquisition, retention, and transfer of skill; and the role of constraints in motor activity. These topics are essential for understanding motor development, rehabilitation, and human performance.

    Taught: Spring

    Credits: 4

  
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    EXSC 3210 - Human Anatomy and Physiology I (with Lab)


    Goals: Human Anatomy and Physiology I is part of two-course series. This course series satisfies the requirement in Anatomy and Physiology for most professional schools.  Students taking this course will appreciate the complexity of human body, examine the principles and mechanisms underlying human body function from organ systems down to the molecular level, and further develop their critical thinking and written and oral communication skills. During laboratory exercises, students will conduct hands-on experiments investigating the principles of human body function in response to various conditions.

    Content: Anatomy and Physiology I will complement Anatomy and Physiology II and will cover the general organization of the human body, tissues, and the anatomy and physiology of the skeletal and muscular systems, skin, and nervous system.

    This course does not count toward the Biology major.

    Taught: Fall

    Prerequisites: BIOL 1510 and 1520 (grades of C- or better)

    Note: Students must concurrently register for a lecture and a corresponding 0-credit lab section of this course.

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    EXSC 3220 - Human Anatomy and Physiology II (with Lab)


    Goals: Human Anatomy and Physiology II is a part of two-course series. This course series satisfies the requirement in Anatomy and Physiology for most professional schools. Students are allowed to count only one of two courses of this series toward their Biology major. Students taking this course will appreciate the complexity of human body, examine the principles and mechanisms underlying human body function from organ system down to the molecular level, and further develop their critical thinking and written and oral communication skills. During laboratory exercises, students will conduct hands-on experiments investigating the principles of human body function in response to various conditions.

    Content: Anatomy and Physiology II will complement Anatomy and Physiology I and will cover the anatomy and physiology of the respiratory, digestive, urinary, circulatory, endocrine, and reproductive systems, and early development.

    This course does not count toward the Biology major.

    Taught: Spring

    Prerequisites: BIOL 1510 and 1520 (grades of C- or better)

    Note: Students must concurrently register for a lecture and a corresponding 0-credit lab section of this course.

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    EXSC 3300 - Research Methods in Exercise Science


    Goals: This course will acquaint students with various methodological approaches used in the fields of exercise science and kinesiology. Students will gain experience in research design and methodology, data collection methods, and analytical techniques through the development and execution of a research project.

    Content: Study design, methodology, and principles of testing and measurement in exercise science. Includes basic statistical methods most commonly used in exercise science. Emphasis is placed on engagement with the scientific literature, the process of following the scientific method, development of hypotheses and appropriate hypothesis testing, and ethics in human subjects research.

    Taught: Alternate years, spring term

    Prerequisite: MATH 1200, QMBE 1310, or an equivalent statistics course, with a grade of C- or better

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    EXSC 3400 - Biomechanics and Kinesiology (with Lab)


    Goals: To introduce students to applied concepts and principles of biomechanics. Emphasis will be placed on biomechanical analysis of human movement from sports science and rehabilitation perspectives.

    Content: Research of a system, linear and angular kinematics, linear and angular kinetics, work, power, energy, stability, projectile motion, mechanics of the body, mechanisms of injury, and movement analysis.

    Taught: Annually

    Prerequisite: EXSC 3210 with a grade of C- or better

    Note: Students must concurrently register for a lecture and a corresponding 0-credit lab section of this course.

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    EXSC 3410 - PsychoSocial Aspects of Sport and Exercise


    Goals: This is an introductory course on psychological and sociological impacts of sport and exercise on individuals and communities. Students will gain knowledge of influences to personal health behaviors, psychological impacts of exercise and sport participation, social constructs of sport and exercise, as well as an understanding of athletic performance.

    Content: Students will cover key terms and principles of both psychology and sociology, in relationship to sport and exercise behaviors. Topics included in this class will be: personality, motivation, stress and coping, aggression, moral development, team building and cohesion, competition, and leadership. This course will emphasize the role of sport psychology in influencing participants’ cognition, emotion, and behavior in physical activity and sport settings, as well as the impacts of sport and exercise on society and vice versa. 

    Taught: Alternate years, spring term

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    EXSC 3420 - Advanced Principles of Strength and Conditioning


    Goals: To review anatomical, biomechanical, and bioenergetics principles that play key roles in S&C program design and personal training; to understand the role of hormones in training adaptations; to learn the major differences in training adaptations to aerobic and anaerobic training programs; to examine training differences for various populations, athletes, and gender; to understand optimal nutrition guidelines for performance and health; to assess an individual’s level of fitness using NSCA and ACSM guidelines; to demonstrate proper execution of resistance, cardiovascular and flexibility exercises; to learn how to fully design training programs, that includes warm-up, flexibility, resistance training, and conditioning for various populations; and to understand legal and ownership aspects of S&C and personal training in a professional setting.

    Content: This course is designed to provide students with an advanced and evidence-based understanding of strength and conditioning program design for all populations to promote health, fitness, and performance. Students will use current research to develop and justify programs and techniques for numerous and diverse clients.  This course will prepare students for the Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) certification exam, as well as various personal training certifications.

    Taught: Fall

    Prerequisite: EXSC 3210 with a grade of C- or better

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    EXSC 3510 - Exercise Physiology (with Lab)


    Goals: This course acquaints students with fundamental concepts and theories of the physiological responses to exercise.

    Content: Topics covered include oxygen consumption, exercise metabolism, cardiorespiratory adaptations, thermoregulation, hormonal responses, exercise nutrition, body composition, and adaptive responses to modes of both endurance and strength training.

    Taught: Annually

    Prerequisite: EXSC 3210 with a grade of C- or better

    Note: Students must concurrently register for a lecture and a corresponding 0-credit lab section of this course.

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    EXSC 3610 - Personal Training Certification Course


    Goals: After completing this course, students will be able to: 

    • Understand and explain key terms and principles of basic anatomy, kinesiology, and exercise physiology
    • Assess an individual’s level of fitness using ACSM guidelines
    • Design and customize exercise programs
    • Demonstrate proper execution of resistance, cardiovascular and flexibility exercises
    • Demonstrate at least one strength exercise for every major muscle group
    • Explain ACSM and AHA recommendations for cardiovascular exercise
    • Modify exercise programs to meet the needs of special populations


    Content: This certification course prepares students to practice as a professional Personal Fitness Trainer. The course includes online classroom learning equal to 16 hours of live classroom education, 16 hours of practical training and a 30-hour internship (internship only required for Level 2 Certification). Topics include anatomy, biomechanics, exercise physiology, fitness testing and health assessment, nutrition, exercise prescription, equipment usage, special populations, legal and safety issues. Students who successfully complete the online classroom education and exam, practical training and exam, internship and CPR and AED certifications will receive their nationally recognized W.I.T.S. Personal Training Certification.

    Credits: 2

  
  •  

    EXSC 3620 - Group Exercise Instructor Certification


    Goals: After completing this course, students will be able to:

    • Understand and explain key terms and principles of basic anatomy, kinesiology, and exercise physiology
    • Assess an individual’s level of fitness using ACSM guidelines
    • Design and customize exercise programs and classes for groups
    • Demonstrate proper execution of resistance, cardiovascular, and flexibility exercises
    • Demonstrate at least one strength exercise for every major muscle group
    • Explain ACSM and AHA recommendations for cardiovascular exercise
    • Modify exercise programs to meet the needs of special populations


    Content: This certification course prepares students to practice as a professional group exercise instructor. The course includes online classroom learning equal to 16 hours of live classroom education, 16 hours of practical training and a 30-hour internship (internship only required for Level 2 Certification). Topics include anatomy, biomechanics, exercise physiology, fitness testing and health assessment, nutrition, exercise prescription, equipment usage, special populations, legal and safety issues. Students who successfully complete the online classroom education and exam, practical training and exam, internship and CPR and AED certifications will receive their nationally recognized W.I.T.S. Group Exercise Certification. 

    Credits: 2

  
  •  

    EXSC 5510 - Advanced Exercise Physiology: Clinical Applications (with Lab)


    Goals: This course expands upon the concepts learned in EXSC 3510, and applies them to clinical populations.

    Content: Students will gain an understanding of the physiological mechanisms that underlie many of the chronic diseases that contribute to the leading causes of mortality in the US, how testing is performed for markers of many conditions, and how exercise is essential to their prevention and treatment.

    Taught: Annually

    Prerequisite: EXSC 3510 (grade of C- or better) or instructor permission

    Note: Students must concurrently register for a lecture and a corresponding 0-credit lab section of this course.

    Credits: 4

  
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    EXSC 5950 - Senior Capstone


    Goals: To synthesize the concepts and approaches from the field of Exercise Science that have been learned through prior coursework and the internship or research experience; to prepare for the next steps in the academic or career path; and to formally present one’s internship or research experience through a poster as well as an oral presentation.

    Content: The first half of the course focuses on professional development and preparing to apply to graduate school or for jobs in the field. This includes resume, statement of purpose and interview preparation. The second half focuses on synthesizing what has been learned in coursework at Hamline with what the student has experienced and learned in the field during the internship or research experience. Students present their work during a poster presentation, and in an oral presentation.

    Taught: Fall

    Prerequisites: Senior standing. The internship or research experience should either be completed prior to enrolling in this course, or significantly underway.

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    EXSC 5961 - Exercise Science Seminar I


    Goals: The seminar program aims at introducing students to cutting edge research in the fields of biology and exercise science.

    Content: The seminar program includes presentations by outside speakers, Hamline faculty, and students. 

    Taught: Each semester

    Prerequisites: BIOL 1510 and 1520 (grades of C- or better)

    Note: Required for exercise science majors.

    Credits: 1

  
  •  

    EXSC 5962 - Exercise Science Seminar II


    Goals: The seminar program aims at introducing students to cutting edge research in the fields of biology and exercise science.

    Content: The seminar program includes presentations by outside speakers, Hamline faculty, and students. 

    Taught: Each semester

    Prerequisite: EXSC 5961 (grade of C- or better)

    Note: Required for exercise science majors.

    Credits: 1

  
  •  

    EXSC 5963 - Exercise Science Seminar III


    Goals: The seminar program aims at introducing students to cutting edge research in the fields of biology and exercise science.

    Content: The seminar program includes presentations by outside speakers, Hamline faculty, and students. 

    Taught: Each semester

    Prerequisite: EXSC 5962 (grade of C- or better)

    Note: Required for exercise science majors.

    Credits: 1

  
  •  

    EXSC 5964 - Exercise Science Seminar Presentation


    Goals: The seminar program aims at introducing students to cutting edge research in the fields of biology and exercise science.

    Content: All Exercise Science majors must present the results of a research project as part of the degree requirements for the major. Seniors in their last semester of the Exercise Science Major should register for this course and present a research seminar to the department.

    Taught: Each semester; to be taken in final semester, senior year

    Prerequisite: EXSC 5963 (grade of C- or better)

    Note: Required for exercise science majors.

    Credits: 1

  
  •  

    FIN 1010 - Starting Your Financial Life & Applied Investing


    Goals: Money is power – in more ways than you may think! Money gives you control of your life.  It gives you options.  It enables you to do the things you really want to do. Your college years will fly by. Then, ready or not, here comes a career – launching you into your financial future.

    Starting Your Financial Life & Applied Investing is designed to get you started on the path to financial freedom. The goal is to let you hit the ground running when you finish school.

    Content: The course covers what everyone should know about financial planning. Topics include spending on both big items and small, debt/credit management, earnings, budgeting, savings, and retirement planning. In addition, you’ll get practice investing with real money. The class will be managing approximately $200,000 of the Hamline University’s endowment funds as you learn and apply both classic investment strategies of 1) stock picking and 2) asset allocation with mutual funds and ETFs.  

    Taught: Fall and spring semesters

    Prerequisite: None. The class is open to anyone. Do not worry if the world of investing is new to you; you will learn as you go and get guidance along the way.

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    FIN 3100 - Foundations of Finance


    Goals: To understand fundamentals of financial management and to analyze quantitative and judgmental aspects of financial situations.

    Content: Business organization, ratio analysis, forecasting, breakeven analysis, working capital management, capital budgeting, valuation, leverage, and financial markets are examined.

    Prerequisites: ACCT 1320, ECON 1100, and QMBE 1320 (or concurrent registration in QMBE 1320), with grades of C- or better for all courses, or consent of the instructor.

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    FIN 3700 - Financial Markets and Institutions


    Goals: This course introduces knowledge and skills required to be successful in the financial services industry.

    Content: While examining the financial system of the United States and other countries it introduces students to financial institutions, securities markets, the role of money in the economy, and the monetary system. Financial markets fund much of the expenditures of governments, individuals, and corporations, and financial institutions are the conduit through which funds flow from savers to those with funding needs. The course emphasizes real-world applications on how financial markets and institutions affect the investment decisions of financial managers.

    Prerequisite: FIN 3100 with a grade of C- or better

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    FIN 3710 - Financial Analysis


    Goals: To demonstrate the use of the theory of financial management as an integral part of making complex business decisions and to prepare students to present and defend their reasoning in a clear and concise manner.

    Content: Fixed asset management, capital structure management, and financial analysis and planning through case analysis.

    Prerequisite: FIN 3100 with a grade of C- or better

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    FIN 3720 - Investment Management


    Goals: To learn and apply basic concepts of investment management using risk/return analysis and empirical evidence to examine the efficient markets hypothesis, portfolio diversification strategies, securities valuation, and investment decision-making in changing global markets.

    Prerequisite: FIN 3100 with a grade of C- or better

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    FIN 3730 - Corporate Finance


    Goals: To understand and analyze corporate policies and the decision-making that drives financial decisions. Relevant for careers in finance, as well as consulting and strategic planning.

    Content: Capital structure and payout policy, short-term and long-term financial planning, risk management, options and other derivatives, mergers and acquisitions, behavioral finance and international corporate finance.

    Taught: Annually

    Prerequisite: FIN 3100 with a grade of C- or better

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    FIN 3740 - Risk Management


    Goals: Students will quantify the effects of different risk variables within the decision making process and understand their importance to a company.

    Content: Operational, cultural, currency, legislative, human and project risk will be analyzed in an attempt to educate the student on the variety and inconsistency of change in today’s world. The course takes a text and case study approach to managing the different risks that are prevalent in today’s business environment. 

    Prerequisite: FIN 3100 with a grade of C- or better

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    FREN 1110 - Beginning French I


    Goals: To teach students how to speak, read and write by focusing on the fundamental structures of French grammar and vocabulary.

    Content: The course seeks to give students a broader awareness on French and Francophone cultures and a greater understanding vis-à-vis “world-culture” or “world-literature” through videos clips, short stories and fables on a variety of topics that are drawn from the francophone world of literature.

    Taught: Periodically

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    FREN 1120 - Beginning French II


    Goals: In this course you will learn how to speak, read and write by focusing on the fundamental structures of French grammar and vocabulary.

    Content: Emphasis is placed on a broader awareness of French and Francophone cultures and a greater understanding vis-à-vis “world-culture” or “world-literature”. Usage of videos clips, textual readings of French Classical Fables and other francophone short stories or textual excerpts drawn from different periods and genres will enhance students’ knowledge of the francophone world and cultures.

    Taught: Periodically

    Language placement: The department recommends that students complete FREN 1110 before taking this course. Otherwise, students should do the online placement assessment for French and contact the course instructor for placement advice.

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    FYW 1110 - Critical Reading and Composition


    Goals: Develop critical reading skills for analyzing the cultural, social, political, and historical contexts of texts to understand how one is shaped by language and shapes the world through language. Use writing to explore varied perspectives and complexities in texts, issues, and writing tasks.

    Content: Critically reading a variety of multimodal texts and situating them within their larger contexts and one another. Brainstorming, composing, and revising in a variety of genres, with particular attention to entering conversations with rhetorical awareness.

    Taught: Fall and spring

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    FYW 1120 - Composition and Research


    Goals: Develop skills appropriate for researching and writing in academic and public contexts. Use research to explore varied perspectives on complex issues. Write to articulate a focused idea supported by evidence and with attention to audience expectations and genre conventions.

    Content: Researching and reading a variety of multimodal texts to identify their cultural, social, political, and historical contexts. Engaging the writing process from brainstorming to revising. Focusing on elements of effective communication, including purpose, organization, tone, and style.

    Taught: Fall and spring

    Prerequisite: FYW 1110 or exempt status

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    GED 7050 - Student Teaching Seminar


    This is the required weekly seminar that accompanies the student teaching experience. Refer to the course description for the student teaching experience.

    This course is only open to teacher-candidates who have adequate preparation in licensure areas; have demonstrated proficiency in Minnesota’s Standards for Effective Practice for Beginning Teachers (SEPTBs); have received formal approval by the Education Department faculty to student teach; have met all program requirements; and have demonstrated the dispositions, knowledge, and skills to enter the teaching profession. Concurrent registration in the appropriate student teaching section is also required (course number is based on your licensure area).

    Teacher candidates must attend a student-teaching intake session, which takes place in the fall semester. Contact your advisor or the Placement Office for scheduling information.

    Credits: 2

  
  •  

    GED 7801 - Introduction to Advanced Teacher Thinking


    This session welcomes students to Hamline’s School of Education (HSE). Students will be introduced to HSE’s Conceptual Framework which forms the foundation on which the Teacher Licensure Program is grounded. The session will examine the attitudes and dispositions necessary to be an effective and professional educator as well as the value HSE places on reflection, collaboration, social justice, and equity.

    Note: This lab course is required, bears no academic credit, and is graded on a Pass/No Pass basis.

    Credits: 0

  
  •  

    GED 7802 - Preparing to Student Teach: Advising and Reflection


    This one-session course is a follow-up to GED 7801 and will help prepare teacher candidates for student teaching. Students will explore critical aspects of teaching such as: Dispositions, Philosophy & Profile statements, State Requirements for Licensure (including field placement requirements). The course will help prepare students for the SEPBT Conference and the EDTPA (Teacher Performance Assessment). Students will also revisit their antiracism SMART goal from 7801 and consider how it can be applied to their teaching moving forward.

    Credits: 0

  
  •  

    GED 7835 - Teaching Art in the Elementary School K-6


    Select and implement developmentally appropriate materials and activities for the teaching of art in the elementary classroom.  Overview of basic concepts and skills in art; group activities and/or classroom involvement with elementary school children. This is a graduate level course with graduate level expectations.  

    Prerequisite: EDU 3260/GED 7867 - Theory to Practice (grade of B- or higher) or concurrent enrollment; Undergraduate students must be admitted to the Teacher Education Program.

    Same semester enrollment in GED 7836 - Teaching Music in the Elementary School; GED 7837 - Teaching Health in the Elementary School; and GED 7838 - Teaching Physical Education in the Elementary School, is recommended. Courses are offered consecutively.

    Credits: 1

  
  •  

    GED 7836 - Teaching Music in the Elementary School K-6


    Select and implement developmentally appropriate materials and activities for the teaching of music in the elementary classroom. Overview of basic concepts and skills in music; group activities and/or classroom involvement with elementary school children. This is a graduate level course with graduate level expectations.  

    Prerequisite: EDU 3260/GED 7867 - Theory to Practice (grade of B- or higher) or concurrent enrollment; Undergraduate students must be admitted to the Teacher Education Program.

    Same semester enrollment in GED 7835 - Teaching Art in the Elementary School; GED 7837 - Teaching Health in the Elementary School; and GED 7838 - Teaching Physical Education in the Elementary School, is recommended. Courses are offered consecutively.

    Credits: 1

  
  •  

    GED 7837 - Teaching Health in the Elementary School K-6


    Select and implement developmentally appropriate materials and activities for the teaching of health in the elementary classroom. Overview of basic concepts and skills in health; group activities and/or classroom involvement with elementary school children. This is a graduate level course with graduate level expectations.

    Prerequisite: EDU 3260/GED 7867 - Theory to Practice (grade of B- or higher) or concurrent enrollment; Undergraduate students must be admitted to the Teacher Education Program.

    Same semester enrollment in GED 7835 - Teaching Art in the Elementary School; GED 7836 - Teaching Music in the Elementary School; and GED 7838 - Teaching Physical Education in the Elementary School, is recommended. Courses are offered consecutively.

    Credits: 1

  
  •  

    GED 7838 - Teaching Physical Education in the Elementary School K-6


    Select and implement developmentally appropriate materials and activities for the teaching of physical education in the elementary classroom. Overview of basic concepts and skills in physical education; group activities and/or classroom involvement with elementary school children. This is a graduate level course with graduate level expectations.

    Prerequisite: EDU 3260/GED 7867 - Theory to Practice (grade of B- or higher) or concurrent enrollment; Undergraduate students must be admitted to the Teacher Education Program.

    Same semester enrollment in GED 7835 - Teaching Art in the Elementary School; GED 7836 - Teaching Music in the Elementary School; and GED 7837 - Teaching Health in the Elementary School, is recommended. Courses are offered consecutively.

    Credits: 1

  
  •  

    GED 7840 - Teaching Social Studies in the Elementary School K-6


    Practice teaching methods specific to the teaching of social studies. Develop an understanding of social studies and the purposes they serve. Exploration of issues in curriculum development. Survey methods of teaching; planning for teaching; study and research skills in social studies; professional and community resources for the social studies teacher; and current trends in social studies. This is a graduate level course with graduate level expectations.

    Prerequisite: EDU 3260/GED 7867 - Theory to Practice (grade of B- or higher) or concurrent enrollment; Undergraduate students must be admitted to the Teacher Education Program.

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    GED 7846 - Teaching Literacy in the Elementary School K-6, Part I


    This two part course focuses on literacy practices for the elementary reader and writer in a 21st century environment. Part one focuses on knowledge of literacy practices. Part two focuses on systems used in the school and classroom to create literate environments that foster reading and writing. Participants will observe, analyze, engage, and co-teach in the elementary classroom. This is a graduate level course with graduate level expectations.

    Thirty hours of focused clinical experience are required; students register for the clinical experience as GED 7846L (lab).

    Prerequisite: EDU 3260/GED 7867 - Theory to Practice (grade of B- or higher) or concurrent enrollment; Undergraduate students must be admitted to the Teacher Education Program.

    Corequisites: This course must be taken concurrently with GED 7846L (lab) and in the same term with GED 7847 - Teaching Literacy in the Elementary School, Part II.

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    GED 7846L - Lab: Teaching Literacy in the Elementary School


    Goals: To develop and incorporate the professional noticing skills of attending to children’s literacy thinking, interpreting developmentally where children are at, and deciding how to respond instructionally.

    This lab is taught in three formats, depending on students’ individual situations:

    Section 1: A 30-hour clinical experience under the facilitated guidance of the course instructor working directly with a small group of students in a school setting. Debriefing, analyzing, and planning with peers for the next lesson occurs immediately after on-site. Course assignments such as lesson planning and a case study on observations of students’ progress are incorporated into the clinical experience.

    Section 2: A 30-hour partially guided clinical experience facilitated by the course instructor in an Extended Day school setting working directly with a small group of students for one and a half hours twice per week. Debriefing, analyzing, and planning with peers for the next lesson occurs within this time on-site. Course assignments such as lesson planning and a case study on observations of students’ progress are incorporated into the clinical experience.

    Section 3: A 30-hour clinical experience arranged in your own school building. Initial Licensure Language Immersion teachers must complete 20 hours in an English-speaking classroom (MN state requirement). 10 hours are in your own classroom adapting literacy lessons. Course assignments such as lesson planning and a case study on observations of students’ progress are incorporated into the clinical experience. Additional License and Non-Language Immersion teachers must consult with the instructor regarding their teaching position to determine the placement options within their building.

    Corequisite: This Lab must be taken concurrently with GED 7846 - Teaching Literacy in the Elementary School K-6, Part I.

    Credits: 2

  
  •  

    GED 7847 - Teaching Literacy in the Elementary School K-6, Part II


    This two part course focuses on literacy practices for the elementary reader and writer in a 21st century environment. Part one focuses on knowledge of literacy practices. Part two focuses on systems used in the school and classroom to create literate environments that foster reading and writing. Participants will observe, analyze, engage, and co-teach in the elementary classroom. Thirty focused clinical experience hours are required between the two courses.

    Prerequisite: EDU 3260/GED 7867 - Theory to Practice (grade of B- or higher) or concurrent enrollment; Undergraduate students must be admitted to the Teacher Education Program.

    Corequisite: This course is required to be taken in the same term with the 4-credit course GED 7846 - Teaching Literacy in the Elementary School K-6, Part I.

    Credits: 2

  
  •  

    GED 7851 - Teaching Science in the Elementary School


    Develop understandings and pedagogical competencies necessary to implement effective science curriculum in the elementary classroom. Implement methods that promote student investigation, discussion, and assessment models that meet the diverse learning needs of elementary students. This is a graduate level class with graduate level expectations.

    Prerequisite: EDU 3260/GED 7867 - Theory to Practice (grade of B- or higher) or concurrent enrollment; Undergraduate students must be admitted to the Teacher Education Program.

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    GED 7852 - Teaching Math in the Elementary School


    Develop understandings and pedagogical competencies necessary to implement effective math curriculum in the elementary classroom. Implement methods that promote student investigation, discussion, and assessment models that meet the diverse learning needs of elementary students. This is a graduate level class with graduate level expectations.

    Prerequisite: EDU 3260/GED 7867 - Theory to Practice (grade of B- or higher) or concurrent enrollment; Undergraduate students must be admitted to the Teacher Education Program.

    Corequisite: This course must be taken concurrently with GED 7852L (lab)

    Credits: 6

  
  •  

    GED 7852L - Lab: Teaching Math in the Elementary School


    Goals: To develop and incorporate the professional noticing skills of attending to children’s mathematical thinking, interpreting developmentally where children are at mathematically, and deciding how to respond instructionally.

    This lab is taught in three formats, depending on students’ individual situations:

    Section 1: A 30-hour clinical experience under the facilitated guidance of the course instructor working directly with a small group of students in a school setting. Debriefing, analyzing, and planning with peers for the next lesson occurs immediately after on-site. Course assignments such as lesson planning and a case study on observations of students’ progress are incorporated into the clinical experience.

    Section 2: A 30-hour partially guided clinical experience facilitated by the course instructor in an Extended Day school setting working directly with a small group of students for one and a half hours twice per week. Debriefing, analyzing, and planning with peers for the next lesson occurs within this time on-site. Course assignments such as lesson planning and a case study on observations of students’ progress are incorporated into the clinical experience.

    Section 3: A 30-hour clinical experience arranged in your own school building. Initial Licensure Language Immersion teachers must complete 20 hours in an English-speaking classroom (State requirement). 10 hours are in your own classroom adapting math lessons. Course assignments such as lesson planning and a case study on observations of your students’ progress are incorporated into the clinical experience. Addition License and Non-Language Immersion teachers must consult with the instructor regarding their teaching position to determine the placement options within your building can be.

    Corequisite: This Lab must be taken concurrently with GED 7852 - Teaching Math in the Elementary School.

    Credits: 2

  
  •  

    GED 7857 - Teaching Communication Arts/Literature, Dance/Theatre Arts Part I


    Goals: To introduce students to the history, theory, pedagogy, and management of teaching Communication Arts/Literature and Dance/Theatre Arts at the middle and secondary levels. First in a two-course sequence.

    Content: The nature of the Communication Arts/Literature and Dance/Theatre; research on teaching and learning in these areas; and the motivation, engagement, and management of adolescents in the middle and secondary classroom settings. This course includes 30 hours of clinical experience outside of scheduled class time - dates, times, and school sites to be determined. This is a graduate level course with graduate level expectations.

    Target audience: 5-12 Communication Arts/Literature and Dance/Theatre licensure candidates

    Taught: Fall term

    Prerequisite: EDU 3260/GED 7867 - Theory to Practice (grade of B- or higher) or concurrent enrollment; Undergraduate students must be admitted to the Teacher Education Program.

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    GED 7858 - Teaching Social Studies in the Middle and Secondary School Part I


    Goals: To introduce students to the history, theory, pedagogy, and management of content in the social sciences and history at the middle and secondary levels. First in a two-course sequence.

    Content: The nature of the social studies; research on social studies teaching and learning; and the motivation, engagement, and management of adolescents in the middle and secondary classroom settings. This course includes 30 hours of clinical experience outside of scheduled class time - dates, times, and school sites to be determined. This is a graduate level course with graduate level expectations.

    Target audience: 5-12 Social Studies licensure candidates

    Taught: Fall term

    Prerequisite: EDU 3260/GED 7867 - Theory to Practice (grade of B- or higher) or concurrent enrollment; Undergraduate students must be admitted to the Teacher Education Program.

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    GED 7870 - Teaching Communication Arts/Literature in the Middle and Secondary School Part II


    Goals: To allow teacher candidates to practice and to demonstrate competence with effective assessment and teaching methodology within middle and secondary communication arts/literature classrooms. Second in a two-course sequence.

    Content: Planning curriculum that incorporates national, state and local standards; implementing a variety of instructional strategies to address the needs of diverse learners; using and implementing formative and summative assessments. This course includes 30 hours of clinical experience outside of scheduled class time - dates, times, and school sites to be determined. This is a graduate level course with graduate level expectations.

    Target audience: 5-12 Communication Arts/Literature licensure candidates

    Taught: Spring term

    Prerequisite: GED 7857 with a grade of B- or better

    Credits: 4

  
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    GED 7871 - Teaching Literacy in the Middle and Secondary School 5-12


    Address the needs of middle- and secondary-level students as they make the transition from emergent to fluent readers. Gain an expanded definition of literacy that incorporates reading, writing, and speaking as tools for learning. Form the basis for instructional strategies designed to improve students’ appreciation for skills of literacy in the learning process. This is a graduate level course with graduate level expectations.

    Prerequisite: EDU 3260/GED 7867 - Theory to Practice (grade of B- or higher) or concurrent enrollment; Undergraduate students must be admitted to the Teacher Education Program.

    Credits: 4

  
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    GED 7872 - Exceptionality


    This course has a 5-hour field placement.

    Survey areas of exceptionality such as learning disabilities, physical and mental disabilities, emotional and behavior disorders, and giftedness, and consider their impact on classroom learning. Address educational practices for responding to exceptional students’ needs. This is a graduate level course with graduate level expectations.

    Target Audience: All licensure candidates

    Taught: All terms

    Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program

    Credits: 2

  
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    GED 7873 - Teaching Social Studies in the Middle and Secondary School Part II


    Goals: To allow teacher candidates to practice and to demonstrate competence with effective assessment and teaching methodology within middle and secondary social studies classrooms. Second in a two-course sequence.

    Content: Planning curriculum that incorporates national, state and local standards; implementing a variety of instructional strategies to address the needs of diverse learners; using and implementing formative and summative assessments. This course includes 30 hours of clinical experience outside of scheduled class time - dates, times, and school sites to be determined. This is a graduate level course with graduate level expectations.

    Target audience: 5-12 Social Studies licensure candidates

    Taught: Spring term

    Prerequisite: GED 7858 with a grade of B- or better 

    Credits: 4

  
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    GED 7874 - Teaching Science in the Middle and Secondary School Part II


    Goals: To allow teacher candidates to practice and to demonstrate competence with effective assessment and teaching methodology within middle and secondary science classrooms. Second in a two-course sequence.

    Content: Planning curriculum that incorporates national, state and local standards; implementing a variety of instructional strategies to address the needs of diverse learners; using and implementing formative and summative assessments. This course includes 30 hours of clinical experience outside of scheduled class time - dates, times, and school sites to be determined. This is a graduate level course with graduate level expectations.

    Target audience: 5-8 and 9-12 Science licensure candidates

    Taught: Spring term

    Prerequisite: GED 7879 with a grade of B- or better 

    Credits: 4

  
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    GED 7879 - Teaching Mathematics and Science in the Middle and Secondary School Part I


    Goals: To introduce students to the history, theory, pedagogy, and management of teaching mathematics and science at the middle and secondary levels. First in a two-course sequence.

    Content: The nature of mathematics and science; research on science and mathematics teaching and learning; and the motivation, engagement, and management of adolescents in the middle and secondary classroom settings. This course includes 30 hours of clinical experience outside of scheduled class time – dates, times, and school sites to be determined. This is a graduate level course with graduate level expectations.

    Target audience: 5-12 Mathematics and 5-8, 9-12 Science licensure candidates

    Taught: Fall term

    Prerequisite: EDU 3260/GED 7867 - Theory to Practice (grade of B- or higher) or concurrent enrollment; Undergraduate students must be admitted to the Teacher Education Program.

    Credits: 4

  
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    GED 7880 - Teaching Mathematics in the Middle and Secondary School Part II


    Goals: To allow teacher candidates to practice and to demonstrate competence with effective assessment and teaching methodology within middle and secondary mathematics classrooms. Second in a two-course sequence.

    Content: Planning curriculum that incorporates national, state and local standards; implementing a variety of instructional strategies to address the needs of diverse learners; using and implementing formative and summative assessments. This course includes 30 hours of clinical experience outside of scheduled class time - dates, times, and school sites to be determined. This is a graduate level course with graduate level expectations.

    Target audience: 5-12 Mathematics licensure candidates

    Taught: Spring term

    Prerequisite: GED 7879 with a grade of B- or better

    Credits: 4

  
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    GED 7881 - Teaching World Languages in K-12 Part II


    Goals: To allow teacher candidates to practice and to demonstrate competence with effective assessment and teaching methodology within K-12 World Languages classrooms. Second in a two-course sequence.

    Content: Planning curriculum that incorporates national, state and local standards; implementing a variety of instructional strategies to address the needs of diverse learners; using and implementing formative and summative assessments. This course includes 30 hours of clinical experience outside of scheduled class time - dates, times, and school sites to be determined. This is a graduate level course with graduate level expectations.

    Target audience: K-12 World Languages licensure candidates

    Taught: Spring term

    Prerequisite: GED 7878 with a grade of B- or better

    Credits: 4

  
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    GED 7882 - Teaching Dance/Theatre Arts in K-12 Part II


    Goals: To prepare the prospective teacher seeking a license in dance/theatre for the professional work.

    Content: Techniques and content ideas for addressing the State of Minnesota Rules Chapter 8710.4300.subpart 3, curriculum and season planning considerations for the teacher, methods of evaluation creative work in an academic setting, best practices for the drama classroom, portfolio development, and the uses of drama techniques in teaching other content areas. This is a graduate course with graduate level expectations.

    This tutorial course involves both online learning and seminar sessions and includes 30 hours of clinical experience outside of scheduled class time - dates, times, and school sites to be determined.

    Target audience: K-12 Dance/Theatre Arts licensure candidates

    Taught: By arrangement

    Prerequisite: GED 7857 with a grade of B- or better

    Credits: 4

 

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