2021-2022 Undergraduate Bulletin 
    
    Dec 07, 2022  
2021-2022 Undergraduate Bulletin [Archived Bulletin]

Courses


 
  
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    GED 7885 - Student Teaching Elementary K-6


    Elementary student teaching provides preservice educators with experiences to connect theory and practice in the context of a K-12 classroom; instructional planning; and implementation in an assigned learning environment. Preservice teachers’ responsibilities include; longterm planning, implementation of an integrated curriculum, the facilitation of small- and large-group learning, and the development of assessment systems that support the Minnesota graduation standards for K-12 students.

    Open only to preservice teachers who have adequate preparation in subject matter; have demonstrated proficiency with regard to the program and Minnesota’s Standards for Effective Practice for Beginning Teachers; have met all program requirements; and, have evidenced fitness for entering the teaching profession. This is graduate level student teaching with graduate level expectations.

    Students must attend a student teaching intake session, which takes place in the fall semester. Contact your advisor or the Director of Field and Student Teaching Experiences, for scheduling information.

    Concurrent registration in GED 7050 - Student Teaching Seminar (2 credits) and participation in the seminar each week is also required.

  
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    GED 7888 - English Learners in the Mainstream


    This course, which is geared toward mainstream teachers across content areas and grade levels, ensures that teacher candidates make their grade-level content accessible to English learners by learning how to write, integrate, and assess academic language objectives into their instruction. Course includes an overview of second language acquisition theories, an introduction to WIDA levels, and a focus on cultural responsiveness for English learners and their families.

    Online sections move at a faster pace and require additional time, self-direction, discipline, a reliable computer, and internet connectivity. Instructors will communicate through Hamline email addresses and students are required to check their email and the online learning platform, Canvas, no less than one time per day.

    Target audience: Required for licensure candidates in all areas except ESL

    Taught: All terms

    Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program

    Credits: 2

  
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    GED 7894 - Student Teaching Secondary 9-12


    Secondary student teaching provides the teacher-candidate the experiences to connect theory and practice in the context of 9-12 classrooms through instructional planning and implementation in an assigned learning environment. The teacher-candidate’s responsibilities include: long-term planning; implementation of an integrated curriculum; the facilitation of small- and large-group learning environments; and the development of assessment systems that support the Minnesota graduation standards for K-12 students.   

    This course is only open to teacher-candidates who have adequate preparation in licensure areas; have demonstrated proficiency in Minnesota’s Standards for Effective Practice for Beginning Teachers (SEPBTs); have received formal approval by the Education Department faculty to student teach; have met all program requirements; and have demonstrated the dispositions, knowledge, and skills to enter the teaching profession.

    Teacher-candidates must attend a student-teaching intake session, which takes place in the fall semester.  Contact your advisor or the Placement Office for scheduling information.

    Concurrent registration in GED 7050 - Student Teaching Seminar (2 credits) and participation in the seminar each week is also required.

  
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    GED 7895 - Student Teaching Secondary 5-12


    Secondary student teaching provides the teacher-candidate the experiences to connect theory and practice in the context of 5-12 classrooms through instructional planning and implementation in an assigned learning environment. The teacher-candidate’s responsibilities include: long-term planning; implementation of an integrated curriculum; the facilitation of small- and large-group learning environments; and the development of assessment systems that support the Minnesota graduation standards for K-12 students.   

    This course is only open to teacher-candidates who have adequate preparation in licensure areas; have demonstrated proficiency in Minnesota’s Standards for Effective Practice for Beginning Teachers (SEPBTs); have received formal approval by the Education Department faculty to student teach; have met all program requirements; and have demonstrated the dispositions, knowledge, and skills to enter the teaching profession.

    Teacher-candidates must attend a student-teaching intake session, which takes place in the fall semester. Contact your advisor or the Placement Office for scheduling information.

    Concurrent registration in GED 7050 - Student Teaching Seminar (2 credits) and participation in the seminar each week is also required.

  
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    GED 7896 - Student Teaching K-12


    K-12 student teaching provides the teacher-candidate the experiences to connect theory and practice in the context of K-12 classrooms through instructional planning and implementation in an assigned learning environment. The teacher-candidate’s responsibilities include: long-term planning; implementation of an integrated curriculum; the facilitation of small- and large-group learning environments; and the development of assessment systems that support the Minnesota graduation standards for K-12 students.   

    This course is open only to teacher-candidates who have adequate preparation in licensure areas; have demonstrated proficiency in Minnesota’s Standards for Effective Practice for Beginning Teachers (SEPBTs); have received formal approval by the Education Department faculty to student teach; have met all program requirements; and have demonstrated the disposition, knowledge, and skills to enter the teaching profession.

    Teacher-candidates must attend a student-teaching intake session, which takes place in the fall semester.  Contact your advisor or the Placement Office for scheduling information.

    Concurrent registration in GED 7050 - Student Teaching Seminar (2 credits) and participation in the seminar each week is also required.

  
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    GED 7897 - Middle-Level Student Teaching 5-8


    Middle-level student teaching provides the teacher-candidate the experiences to connect theory and practice in the context of 5 - 8 classrooms through instructional planning and implementation in an assigned learning environment. The teacher-candidate’s responsibilities include: long-term planning; implementation of an integrated curriculum; the facilitation of small- and large-group learning environments; and the development of assessment systems that support the Minnesota graduation standards for K-12 students.   

    This course is only open to teacher-candidates who have adequate preparation in licensure areas; have demonstrated proficiency in Minnesota’s Standards for Effective Practice for Beginning Teachers (SEPBTs); have received formal approval by the Education Department faculty to student teach; have met all program requirements; and have demonstrated the dispositions, knowledge, and skills to enter the teaching profession.

    Teacher-candidates must attend a student-teaching intake session, which takes place in the fall semester. Contact your advisor or the Placement Office for scheduling information.

    Concurrent registration in GED 7050 - Student Teaching Seminar (2 credits) and participation in the seminar each week is also required.

  
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    GERM 1110 - Beginning German I


    Goals: To master elements of German grammar and vocabulary, especially in practical situations.

    Content: Readings in German; exercises in grammar and vocabulary building; equal emphasis on speaking, understanding the spoken language, writing, and reading.

    Taught: Annually

    Credits: 4

  
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    GERM 1120 - Beginning German II


    Goals: To master elements of German grammar and vocabulary, especially in practical situations.

    Content: Readings in German; exercises in grammar and vocabulary building; equal emphasis on speaking, understanding the spoken language, writing, and reading.

    Taught: Periodically

    Language placement: The department recommends that students complete GERM 1110 before taking this course. Otherwise, students should do the online placement assessment for German and contact the course instructor for placement advice.

    Credits: 4

  
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    GERM 3210 - Intermediate German I


    Goals: To review all topics of German grammar and to enhance all the skills required for proficiency.

    Content: Readings in German, exercises in grammar and vocabulary building; equal emphasis on speaking, understanding the spoken language, writing, and reading.

    Taught: Periodically

    Language placement: The department recommends that students complete GERM 1120 before taking this course. Otherwise, students should do the online placement assessment for German and contact the course instructor for placement advice.

    Credits: 4

  
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    GERM 3220 - Intermediate German II


    Goals: To review all topics of German grammar and to enhance all the skills required for proficiency.

    Content: Readings in German, exercises in grammar and vocabulary building; equal emphasis on speaking, understanding the spoken language, writing, and reading.

    Taught: Periodically

    Language placement: The department recommends that students complete GERM 3210 before taking this course. Otherwise, students should do the online placement assessment for German and contact the course instructor for placement advice.

    Credits: 4

  
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    GERM 3230 - Intermediate German Conversation


    Goals: Designed for the intermediate level, this course helps consolidate a knowledge of German and develops conversational fluency. Excellent preparation for an extended stay in German-speaking countries.

    Content: Emphasis is placed on building vocabulary, strengthening pronunciation, and enhancing fluency by means of role-playing, debates, and conversations. Cultural differences, including speech patterns, personal space, and body language, are identified. German satellite TV programs keep issues current and authentic.

    Taught: Alternate years

    Language placement: The department recommends that students complete GERM 3220 before taking this course. Otherwise, students should do the online placement assessment for German and contact the course instructor for placement advice.

    Credits: 4

  
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    GERM 3900 - Advanced German Conversation and Composition


    Goals: To enable students to speak and write more proficiently and more idiomatically leading toward mastery of fine points of German structure and style. Students learn to express convincingly their own ideas in German.

    Content: Equal weight is given to conversation and composition. Written and oral exercises focus on discursive patterns and the most frequent sources of lexical and syntactical errors. Conversations and essays are based on all genres and films as well as on current German cultural issues.

    Taught: Annually

    Language placement: The department recommends that students complete GERM 3220 before taking this course. Otherwise, students should do the online placement assessment for German and contact the course instructor for placement advice.

    Credits: 4

  
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    GERM 3910 - Professional German


    Goals: To familiarize students with the specific vocabularies and concepts of German business, economics, politics, management, social, and legal issues. Cultural competence and cross-cultural skills are a concomitant objective.

    Content: Focus on Germany as a leading country regarding industry, trade, and markets. Analyses of the German economic, social, and political systems will provide students with a broad knowledge of German business practice and environment. The course will expand all four language modalities (listening, reading, writing, speaking) and cross-cultural awareness as it impacts the areas of business and economics.

    Taught: Periodically

    Language placement: The department recommends that students complete GERM 3220 before taking this course. Otherwise, students should do the online placement assessment for German and contact the course instructor for placement advice.

    Credits: 4

  
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    GLOB 1300 - Gender Perspectives from the Global South


    Goals: To introduce students to basic concepts shared between global studies and the study of gender; to examine power and agency, and the ways in which gender politics changes its form in varying situations; and to study global South contexts, subjectivities, and struggles utilizing these analytic tools.

    Content: Students will be introduced to feminist perspectives that represent current trends in the discipline, especially as they pertain to global South/Third World contexts; study how globalization, as an ongoing process of social and economic change, impacts gendered practices, ideologies and forms of politics; develop analytic skills through dialoguing about films, memoir, ethnography, essays and articles focused on gender issues in the global South.

    Credits: 4

  
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    GLOB 1910 - Introduction to Global Studies


    Goals: To introduce students to the interdisciplinary field of global studies.

    Content: An introduction to key concepts and issues in global studies. Key texts introduce themes explored in upper-level courses. International Roundtable presentations by guest faculty illustrate the interdisciplinary and global nature of the field.

    Taught: Annually, both semesters.

    Credits: 4

  
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    GLOB 3020 - Interdisciplinary Research Methods


    Goals: To introduce students to interdisciplinary research methodologies and to develop the skills and knowledge necessary to carry out research in the field.

    Content: The course focuses on conducting research from an interdisciplinary perspective and covers questions of epistemology, ontology, and practical applications of various research methods. Students will acquire the skills necessary to approach issues or events from an interdisciplinary perspective so that they may be able to synthesize multiple fields of study into a research project, and develop sophisticated research proposals.

    Taught: Annually, in the spring semester.

    Credits: 4

  
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    GLOB 3100 - African Crises in Global Perspective


    Goals: To learn about social and cultural consequences for Africans of historical and contemporary exploitation of the continent’s natural resources and its human beings. To gain an understanding of how countries and societies in Africa have fared in the past couple centuries as global economic, political, cultural, and environmental interconnections have intensified.

    Content: Particular emphasis will be placed on interrogating reasons for exploitation, and we will do this through immersion in journalistic, literary, cultural, and cinematic representations of various “crises” on the African continent. Students will become more aware of root causes of some of the strife and destitution that often gets associated with Africa as a result of Hollywood and mass media representations. We will also explore specific responses and resistances to socio-political turmoil in given locales.

    Credits: 4

  
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    GLOB 3200 - Cultural Politics of Global Health


    Goals: To learn about the ways in which geographic and social locations as well as institutional structures and global economies affect peoples’ interpretations, understandings, and experiences of illness and health.

    Content: Particular emphasis will be placed on examining differential access to health resources and interrogating ways in which power is utilized to privilege some sectors and deprive other groups of basic standards of health. Health care becomes synonymous with human rights in this framework, and examinations of structural violence help us to look at how global processes interact with more local institutional and economic systems to have a direct impact on the life chances and health of specific communities and individuals.

    Credits: 4

  
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    GLOB 3300 - Gender Perspectives from the Global South


    Goals: To introduce students to basic concepts shared between global studies and the study of gender; to examine power and agency, and the ways in which gender politics changes its form in varying situations; and to study global South contexts, subjectivities, and struggles utilizing these analytic tools.

    Content: Students will be introduced to feminist perspectives that represent current trends in the discipline, especially as they pertain to global South/Third World contexts; study how globalization, as an ongoing process of social and economic change, impacts gendered practices, ideologies and forms of politics; develop analytic skills through dialoguing about films, memoir, ethnography, essays and articles focused on gender issues in the global South.

    Credits: 4

  
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    GLOB 3500 - Global Justice


    Goals: This course will examine major themes in global justice: the moral status of individuals, states and peoples; theories of human rights; the ethics of humanitarian intervention; and global inequality, poverty and distributive justice. The ultimate objective of the course is to provide a better understanding of the uneven impact of the process and policies of development and globalization on different populations and segments of society.

    Content: Particular emphasis will be placed on transnational efforts to promote global justice, equitable development, and peace and security. Topics include the roles of the United Nations and other IGOs such as the WTO and IMF in the North-South debate, Structural Adjustment Policies, Free Trade versus Fair Trade, Environmental Security, democratization of global governance, and the responsibilities of individuals and states to secure universal human rights and sustainable human development.

    Credits: 4

  
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    GLOB 3550 - International Organizations


    Crosslisted: Also listed as PSCI 3550

    Goals: To explore the foundations of international governmental and nongovernmental organizations; through case studies and policy issues, to discuss the United Nations and its affiliated groups; to examine how transitional actors have tried to deal with critical world issues such as hunger, environmental dilemmas, human rights, and the disparities of development.

    Content: This course includes a discussion of theories of integration, histories of international organizations, and analyses of approaches to policy and politics in the international arena. This course serves as a precursor for GLOB 3650 (Model United Nations), which is offered in the Spring, and helps prepare students to participate in the Model United Nations program at Hamline. It fulfills upper level requirements for Global Studies and Political Science.

    Taught: Annually, in the fall semester

    Credits: 4

  
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    GLOB 3600 - Human Rights in a Globalized World


    Goals: This course surveys normative questions within human rights discourses, with a stress on international and transnational efforts to promote equity and human rights standards.

    Content: Topics include the contributions of international and non-governmental organizations as well as transnational actors to global discourses on human and women’s rights, social justice and global equity. A particular emphasis is placed on understanding the North-South Debate, the process and policies of development and their uneven impact on the human rights of different populations and segments of society. Special consideration is given to the controversy between the universal and particular applications of human rights.

    Credits: 4

  
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    GLOB 3650 - Model United Nations


    Crosslisted: Also listed as PSCI 3600

    Goals: Through this course, students will develop research, critical thinking, and team-building skills; students will also gain perspectives on the role of international organizations and non-governmental organizations in the international community. Students will gain an appreciation for diverse cultures, modes of negotiation and conflict resolution, and the professional nature of diplomacy.

    Content: This course is designed to help prepare students to serve as delegates to the National Model United Nations Conference in New York. Students will also have the opportunity to visit other international agencies and NGOs (non-governmental organizations) in New York as well as volunteer with organizations in the Twin Cities. Topics discussed in the class will include: the nature of diplomacy, how nations interact, the operations of the United Nations system, the role of NGOs, and case studies of individual countries which the team will represent at the simulation in New York. Students will engage in mock debates and discussions of UN policy initiatives. By discussing the work of the UN and NGOs, students will also gain an understanding of a variety of transnational issues such as arms control, security, HIV/AIDS, environmental protection, child labor, etc.

    Taught: Annually, in spring term

    Prerequisites: Instructor permission and acceptance to the Model UN team; GLOB 1910 is recommended

    Credits: 4

  
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    GLOB 3700 - Social Media and Contentious Politics in the Global Age


    Goals: The tweet heard across the world started a revolution in a small, relatively stable country in the Middle East (Tunisia) in January 2011 and within months had spread like wildfire across the globe, challenging the reign of the seemingly most firmly entrenched economic and political systems. Fueled by a newly energized youth and social media technology, non-ideological and peaceful protest movements —from Occupy Wall Street in the U.S., to riots in London, protests in Spain, Chile, and Russia, for example— have generated a wave of unprecedented regional changes with far-reaching global effects.

    Content: This course will examine the roots and future implications of these global youth movements as they navigate uncharted territory, and consequent regional upheaval through the lens of new social movement theory, cyberactivism and the democratization of the public sphere.

    Credits: 4

  
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    GLOB 5010 - Honors Project


    Goals: To undertake a capstone independent research project that will lead to honors in the global studies major.

    Content: A focus on the research and writing process, from conceptualization through completion. Students pursue projects on topics of individual interest but share both discussions of the research and writing process and a first draft of their honors project with other students.

    Taught: Annually

    Prerequisite: Acceptance of an honors proposal in the major

    Note: Students must also register for and attend GLOB 5900 as a 0-credit course in the fall semester.

    Credits: 6 (which are distributed as 3 credits in fall and 3 credits in spring)

  
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    GLOB 5900 - Senior Research Seminar


    Goals: To produce a capstone independent research product (e.g., paper, web site, media project) that demonstrates the ability to conduct interdisciplinary research and writing in global studies.

    Content: A focus on the research and writing process, from conceptualization through completion. Students pursue projects on topics of individual interest but share both discussions of the research and writing process and their final products with other students.

    Taught: Annually, in the fall semester.

    Prerequisite: Senior standing in global studies or consent of instructor.

    Credits: 4

  
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    HIST 1200 - Ancient Greece and Rome


    Goals: To understand some of the key developments that shaped society, culture, and politics in this period.

    Content: This course will examine the evolution of Ancient Greek and Roman cultures and give the students an overview of some of the main themes and developments which made those cultures important. Some of the questions examined will be: How did Ancient Greek civilization differ from that of its neighbors? Why is Ancient Greece and Rome important to this day? What can we learn from the Roman political evolution from a Republic to Empire?

    Taught: Annually

    Credits: 4

  
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    HIST 1210 - Plague, War, Slavery, and Ideas in European History


    Goals: To understand some of the key developments that shaped European society, culture, and politics in the early modern period (1350-1800).

    Content: This course surveys the history of Europe over five centuries. It looks at plague, war, and antisemitism; witchcraft and alchemy; new religions and scientific discoveries; the Atlantic slave trade and the systematic enslavement of millions of Africans that it made possible; and the causes and results—political, cultural, social—of these shocking developments.

    Taught: Annually

    Credits: 4

  
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    HIST 1220 - Reforms and Revolutions in Europe


    Goals: To understand some of the key developments that shaped European society, culture, and politics since the French Revolution.

    Content: The purpose of this course is to introduce the students to some of the main themes (political, social, cultural, and economic) which have characterized the evolution of modern Europe from the time that it was the undisputed center of world politics and diplomacy to its present position.

    Taught: Annually

    Credits: 4

  
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    HIST 1230 - Islam in Europe: The Ottoman Empire


    Goals: To understand some of the key developments that shaped European society, culture, and politics under Islam.

    Content: The purpose of the course is to study the impact of political Islam on Europe. From the 14th to the 20th century the Ottoman Empire, an Islamic state, had a major presence in Europe occupying most of the Balkans. We will study how East and West, Islam and Christianity reacted to each other and what were the wider implications of that contact for the development of Southeastern Europe as well as its legacy to this day.

    Taught: Annually

    Credits: 4

  
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    HIST 1300 - Introduction to American History: Civil War and Reconstruction


    Goals: To understand the key social, economic, and political developments that shaped the United States from the Early Republic era to the end of the Reconstruction.

    Content: The American Civil War was the bloodiest and the most traumatic war in American history. This course will focus on three topics: the causes of the Civil War; the course of the war and emancipation; and the outcomes of the Civil War and Reconstruction.

    Taught: Annually

    Credits: 4

  
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    HIST 1310 - Introduction to American History: 1877-Present


    Goals: To understand the key social, economic, and political developments that shaped the United States from 1877 to the present day.

    Content: Various topics such as industrialization, reform and the move toward a welfare state, ethnic relations within American society, and the rise of the U.S. to the status of a world power.

    Taught: Annually

    Credits: 4

  
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    HIST 1400 - Latin American History: Pre-Columbian to Modern


    Goals: To understand key developments and themes in the history of Latin America from ancient times to the twentieth century.

    Content: Various topics such as the nature and legacy of the colonial encounter, the contributions of Native American, European, African, and Asian peoples to the creation of the distinctive cultures and societies of the Americas, and Latin American relations with other hemispheric and international powers.

    Taught: Annually

    Credits: 4

  
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    HIST 1410 - Latin American History: Cuba and Puerto Rico


    Goals: To develop an understanding of key developments in the history of Cuba and Puerto Rico.

    Content: This course considers the related but distinct histories of Cuba and Puerto Rico. We will examine both the similarities and divergences of their experience as Spain’s longest-held colonies in the Americas, as well as their different but intertwining struggles for independence and social and economic development in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Topics to be considered in the course will include the context of Puerto Rican and Cuban development within the Caribbean region and the Spanish Empire, the economic, geographical, strategic, cultural and demographic factors that have shaped each island’s history, comparisons as well as connections between Cuba and Puerto Rico, and the nature of each island’s relations with the United States.

    Taught: Every other year

    Credits: 4

  
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    HIST 1420 - Latin American History: Mexico


    Goals: To understand key events and dynamics in Mexico’s history.

    Content: This course explores major themes in Mexican social and political history, focusing on the period since independence. Following an overview of colonial legacies, the course surveys significant developments in the nineteenth century. It then traces the momentous events of the world’s first social revolution of the twentieth century, which transformed Mexico during the years 1910 to 1920 and beyond. The changes wrought by the Revolution paved the way for the distinctive course Mexico has charted throughout the twentieth century, different from other Latin American countries in many respects.

    Taught: Every other year

    Credits: 4

  
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    HIST 1430 - Historical Study Abroad


    Goals: To study the history of a particular place by traveling and immersion.

    Content: Focus varies. Recent examples: Ancient and Modern Greece.

    Taught: This course is offered for credit whenever an appropriate study abroad is being conducted under the auspices of Hamline University.

    Credits: 4

  
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    HIST 1600 - Introduction to Chinese History


    Goals: To understand the key characteristics that shaped the evolution of China both regionally and globally from ancient times to the present.

    Content: Various topics such as revolutionary and reformist tendencies, globalization, the social role of students and intellectuals, the rise of Communist governance, democracy, the status of women, imperialism, market reforms, and nationalism.

    Taught: Annually

    Note: Topics and time periods covered vary from year to year. Recent examples: The Challenge of Reform and Revolution in China’s Past and Present; Continuity and Change in China’s Imperial Past.

    Credits: 4

  
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    HIST 3000 - Workshop in History


    Goals: To teach students the skills related to public history. This course is recommended, in preference to HIST 3010, for students who plan to teach at the K-12 level.

    Content: Public, local, and community history.

    Taught: Alternate years

    Prerequisites: One 1000-level HIST course and one 3000-level HIST course.

    Recommended: Completion of three 1000-level HIST courses.

    Credits: 4

  
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    HIST 3010 - Historical Methods


    Goals: To expose students to some of the key philosophies of history; to teach students the skills necessary to write a capstone essay (in either the department’s senior seminar or as a departmental honors project) and to work as a professional historian.

    Content: Focus on philosophies of history, historical methodologies, analysis, argumentation, research, and writing.

    Taught: Annually

    Prerequisites: One 1000-level HIST course and one 3000-level HIST course

    Note: This course is required for all majors and minors and cannot be taken with the senior seminar.

    Credits: 4

  
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    HIST 3760 - Topics in the History of Imperialism


    Goals: To understand the history of imperialism.

    Content: Focus varies. Recent example: The British Empire.

    Taught: Alternate years

    Credits: 4

  
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    HIST 3800 - Topics in Gender History


    Goals: To study the history of women and gender.

    Content: Focus varies. Recent examples: Homosexuality in Victorian Britain; Women and Revolution in Modern Europe.

    Taught: Alternate years

    Credits: 4

  
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    HIST 3880 - Topics in the History of War


    Goals: To understand the history of war.

    Content: Focus varies. Recent examples: Europe and WWII; Europe and WWI.

    Taught: Alternate years.

    Credits: 4

  
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    HIST 3910 - Topics in Russian and Eastern European History


    Goals: To study the history of Russia and Eastern European History.

    Content: Focus varies. Recent examples: Modern Russia from the Empire to the Revolution; The Rise and Fall of the Soviet Union.

    Taught: Alternate years

    Credits: 4

  
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    HIST 3930 - Topics in United States History


    Goals: To study the history of the United States.

    Content: Focus varies. Recent examples: Reform Movements in American History, Landmark Trials, Immigration, America in the Middle East.

    Taught: Alternate years

    Credits: 4

  
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    HIST 3940 - Topics in Latin American History


    Goals: To study the history of Latin America.

    Content: Focus varies. Recent examples: 20th Century Mexico.

    Taught: Alternate years

    Credits: 4

  
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    HIST 3960 - Topics in Comparative History


    Goals: To practice comparative history.

    Content: Focus varies. Recent examples: Disease and Society; Torture and State Terror; The 1960s in Global Perspective.

    Taught: Alternate years

    Credits: 4

  
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    HIST 5950 - Seminar in History


    The senior seminar provides a capstone experience in the major, in which students practice and polish previously learned skills and build on previous knowledge and experience to produce a significant research paper.

    Taught: Annually

    Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, three 1000-level HIST courses, three 3000-level HIST courses, and completion of HIST 3010 or 3000.  (Seven courses total.)

    Credits: 4

  
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    HONS 1000 - Introduction to Honors


    Goals: To introduce students entering the University Honors Program to the mission and values of the program and to one another; to create a culture of excellence among University Honors students.

    Content: This course introduces students entering the University Honors Program to the mission and values of the program and to one another. Topics include academic rigor, academic honesty, the purpose and value of reflection, and links between curricular and co-curricular learning.

    Credits: 2

  
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    INTD 1460 - Jewelry Making with Metal Clay


    Goals: To experience how the creation of artistic objects requires a fusion of technical skills and creative vision.

    Content: This course combines the development of technical skills in metals construction, tool use and knowledge of chemical patinas with principles of artistic design to foster the creation of new items of wearable jewelry using metal clays. Participants will develop six original design projects and complete six lab experiments during the course. 

    Taught: Winter, alternate years

    Prerequisite: Instructor permission is required for registration.

    Note: This course has an additional materials fee.

    Credits: 4

  
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    INTD 3900 - Innovation


    Goals: To introduce, educate, and train students in the basic principles and best practices of the innovation process and to develop, write, and present an innovation plan.

    Content: The principles and best practices associated with the innovation process such as product development, market analysis, financial strategy, and intellectual properties; interactive sessions between students and accomplished innovators; and field trips to local innovative corporations.

    Credits: 4

  
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    LEAD 1000 - Leadership for the Common Good


    Goals: To understand the the myths surrounding, best practices for, and personal approaches to leadership. To understand the effect an individual can have on society.

    Content: This 1000-level course introduces leadership using a personal leadership perspective and framework. Students taking this course will have the opportunity to examine their own views on leadership; mythologies of leadership; the impact of identity and difference on leadership expression; the differences between personal and positional leadership; and begin to explore concepts and skills relating to effective leadership and positive change for the common good.

    Taught: Fall and spring

    Credits: 4

  
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    LEAD 1010 - Leading Across Groups and Teams


    Goals: To become effect at collaboration and learn best practices for leading with limited authority. To understand personal leadership strategies for supporting effective and functional groups and teams.

    Content: In this collaborative course, students will learn the best practices for exercising leadership on groups and teams while possessing little to no formal authority. Today’s fluid work places require that leaders demonstrate an ability to work both independently and collaboratively, across silos. In this hands-on course, students will explore the theoretical foundations of collaborative and adaptive leadership while applying that knowledge to impactful group and team projects.

    Taught: Fall and spring

    Credits: 4

  
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    LEAD 3000 - Critical Leadership Theory


    Goals: To understand, through a critical lens, the history of the field of leadership and how decolonizing and antiracist approaches can be applied to modern practices of leadership. To explore foundational leadership theories in order to craft one’s own theory of exercising effective, ethical leadership.

    Content: This writing intensive course will provide students with a solid theoretical foundation for both applied leadership and leadership studies in the future. It explores the central questions What is leadership? Who determines what is good leadership? How do we influence the trajectory of leadership practices? What is my own philosophy of leadership?

    Taught: Fall and spring

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    LEAD 3010 - Leading Across Global Systems


    Goals: To weave the together threads of their previous leadership courses in order to understand how to effectively engage in systems in evidence-based, culturally appropriate, and sustainable ways as global-citizen-leaders. To provide students the ability to investigate global issues with moral and ethical aspects and connect them to their own lives.

    Content: Through readings, research, dialogue, and technology that connects us to the world, we will explore what it means to be a global-citizen-leader in a complex and ever-adaptive world. Using collaborative leadership skills students will focus on identifying, defining, and engaging in one issue or grand challenge though interviewing individuals from across the globe and incorporating evidence-based research from scholarly peer-reviewed journals with diverse and culturally tuned perspectives.

    Taught: Fall

    Prerequisites: LEAD 1000 and LEAD 3000

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    LEAD 5100 - Developing Leaders


    Goals: To learn how to develop and empower others to become leaders. To practice bridging leadership practice with leadership theory in community-based settings.

    Content: The best leaders develop and empower those around them. Students in this course will study and practice leadership pedagogies, the role of the follower-leader, and research surrounding leadership education. In order to bridge theory with practice, this course has a field experience component where students will practice teaching leadership/ developing others in a setting of their choice. This course serves as the LEAP experience and capstone course for undergraduates in the leadership minor, but is also open to graduate students interested in learning how to teach leadership.

    Taught: Spring

    Prerequisite: LEAD 3010

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    LGST 1110 - Legal Systems in American Society


    Goals: Familiarization with the American legal system.

    Content: An exploration of the American legal system with special emphasis on the role of law in the American social order. Working models of the judicial system are studied and the legal decision-making process is examined. Emphasis is placed on basic values of the legal system: justice, equality, and fairness.

    Taught: Every semester

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    LGST 1300 - Legal Advocacy, Policy, and Practice


    Goals: To introduce students to legal research and how to navigate the law to understand its impact on their own lives and contexts. 

    Content: A writing intensive course with emphasis on finding, analyzing, and explaining legislative and regulatory materials, with an introduction to how the courts interpret those policies. Students will explore how academics and advocates write about the law and practice advocating for policy changes in America.

    Taught: Every semester

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    LGST 1440 - Mock Trial


    Goals: Students learn basic trial procedures and advocacy skills through practice sessions and courtroom simulations. Students prepare for and conduct a trial of a hypothetical case.

    Content: Participatory study of trial practice in the United States, advocacy, lawyering skills, and legal ethics. Focus on developing students’ speaking and critical thinking skills.

    Taught: Annually

    Note: To be eligible for course credit, the student must participate in mock trial team practice during the fall semester and participate in one weekend tournament.

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    LGST 3100 - American Constitutional Law


    Crosslisted: Also listed as PSCI 3100

    Goals: To study the role of the courts in the development of the American Constitution. To introduce students to the “rule of law” concept in Anglo American judicial history.

    Content: Study of the United States Constitution and U.S. Supreme Court cases on separation of powers, federalism, civil liberties and civil rights.

    Taught: Annually

    Note: This course is applicable to majors and minors in Legal Studies and Political Science, regardless of whether it is taken as LGST 3100 or PSCI 3100. This course will not count as breadth of study for either major. Students may not earn credit for both LGST 3100 and PSCI 3100.

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    LGST 3420 - Topics in Law


    Goals: To provide students with an opportunity to engage in an advanced study in a specialized area of law.

    Content: An intensive study of a specific area of law. Topics vary from semester to semester. Some past topics have been: environmental law, immigration law, international human rights law, and intellectual property.

    Prerequisites: LGST 1110, and LGST 1300 or concurrent registration

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    LGST 3670 - Legal Interviewing


    Goals:  To introduce students to general interviewing principles and to explore in more detail interviewing in the legal setting including interviewing clients and witnesses.

    Content: The course focuses on developing basic interviewing skills and explores particular features of conducting legal interviews including understanding the ethical implications of legal interviews and of cultural diversity as it affects legal interviewing. Particular attention is given to oral communication skills through participation in small group and large group discussions and presentations. Students will have multiple opportunities to practice and analyze their own and others’ oral communication skills and to understand the relationship between their communication choices and outcomes.

    Taught: Annually

    Prerequisite: LGST 1110 or CJFS 1120

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    LGST 3680 - Law of Evidence for Legal Professionals


    Goals:  To provide an overview of the law of evidence, focusing primarily on the Federal Rules of Evidence but, where appropriate, distinguishing the Federal rules from the Minnesota Rules of Evidence.

    Content: This course l covers the terminology, concepts and theories of the law of evidence, including methods of reasoning and of assessing reasoning strength and validity. In addition to becoming familiar with evidentiary rules, students will develop familiarity with Federal and Minnesota Rules of Evidence, identify evidentiary issues in hypothetical fact situations, and think critically about evidentiary concepts and issues. The course also emphasizes the importance of collecting and preserving evidence, identifying necessary witnesses, and understanding appropriate techniques in introducing and objecting to evidence.

    Taught: Annually

    Prerequisite: LGST 1110 or CJFS 1120, and LGST 1300

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    LGST 3760 - Contracts


    Goals:  To provide an overview of contract law.

    Content: This course focuses on contract formation and performance using textbook materials and case law. Students will be introduced to the various elements of a valid contract and will learn and apply practical contract drafting skills.

    Taught: Annually

    Prerequisites: LGST 1110, and LGST 1300 or concurrent registration

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    LGST 3790 - Law and the Lives of Women


    Goals: To gain a better understanding of the legal system, its impact on women, and the historical development of law in the context of the cultural politics of gender.

    Content: Using readings of text and law, and practical learning in the context of advocacy and women’s issues, the course examines 1) the historical development of policies aimed at eliminating gender bias and promoting equality and 2) the practice of advocating for women in the current legal system.

    Taught: Annually

    Prerequisites: LGST 1300 or WSTD 1010, or permission of the legal studies chair.

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    LGST 5600 - Tort Law


    Goals: To introduce students to the body of law that makes up the field of tort law.

    Content: An overview of the rights, obligations and remedies that are applied by courts in civil proceedings to address the claims of individuals that have been injured by the wrongful act of others.

    Taught: Annually

    Prerequisite: LGST 1110 and LGST 1300, or permission of the legal studies chair.

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    LGST 5900 - Legal Studies Practicum


    Goals: To apply the concepts and principles previously learned in a practical working environment under the supervision of a lawyer and/or an experienced paralegal (legal assistant).

    Content: A 150-hour apprenticeship in the performance of the duties of a paralegal in one of the typical settings for members of the profession; hands-on production of drafts and collation of legal documents under experienced supervision and guidance; attendance at weekly seminars, designed to tie experiential and academic experiences together and to ensure adequate preparation for entry in the profession.

    Taught: Every semester

    Prerequisites: A declared major or minor in Legal Studies and junior or senior status.

    Note: Students need to secure an internship before the semester in which they are taking the class and doing the internship.

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    LGST 8000 - Foundations in Law


    This course introduces students to the study of law and prepares them for academic success in their upper level curriculum. After an initial intense focus on the fundamentals of legal reasoning and analysis, the course offers a general overview of the American legal system and examines the ethics rules that govern the work of lawyers and legal professionals.

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    LGST 8010 - Civil Litigation Survey and Procedure


    Introduces students to the substantive legal subjects that often form the basis of civil litigation with a focus on tort law. Students will learn the procedures from initial client intake through trial involved in litigating a case in the civil court system. Students will build on skills have an opportunity to research and create documents in areas that interest them.

    Prerequisite: LGST 8020 or concurrent registration

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    LGST 8012 - Transactions and Contracts in Business


    This survey course is focused on the legal principles involved in transactional legal work, including real estate, contract, and corporate law. Students will learn the basics of contract law and focus on interpreting contract provisions and understanding the approaches legal and business professionals take when drafting and negotiating contracts.

    Prerequisite: LGST 8020 or concurrent registration

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    LGST 8015 - Regulation in America


    This course surveys the complex web of regulatory authority within which individuals, businesses, and other organizations must navigate. Included is an examination of the powers and procedures of administrative agencies; basic principles of constitutional interpretation, including doctrines and competing philosophies; and the framework of state and federal government under the Constitution. The course includes practical lessons for professionals who frequently interact with administrative law.

    Prerequisite: LGST 8020 or concurrent registration

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    LGST 8020 - Legal Writing and Research


    This course introduces students to the tools necessary for investigation, analysis, and communication of legal concepts. These basic tools are essential in a paralegal professional setting and highly useful in any law-related, compliance, or advocacy work. Students will learn how to find and cite primary and secondary legal sources and to find forms and templates commonly used in legal settings. The course introduces students to the structure of written legal analysis and the skills of legal drafting from short e-mails to longer contracts.

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    MATH 1130 - Fundamental Concepts of Mathematics


    Goals: To gain an understanding of how the language of mathematics is used in problem solving. This course is especially appropriate for prospective elementary teachers.

    Content: Precise formulation of problems, symbolization, strategies for solution of mathematical problems, introduction to various number systems and to mathematical logic.

    Taught: Fall and spring

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    MATH 1150 - Precalculus


    Goals: To learn how to use the calculus of one variable and the fundamental concepts of the calculus, with a concurrent review of precalculus concepts.

    Content: Precalculus mathematics emphasizing functions, graphing, and trigonometry concurrent with a first course in calculus.

    Taught: Fall and spring term.

    Prerequisites: Plane geometry and high school algebra.

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    MATH 1170 - Calculus I


    Goals: To learn how to use the calculus of one variable and the fundamental concepts of the calculus.

    Content: Limits, continuity, derivatives and integrals of functions of one variable. Applications are taken mostly from the physical sciences.

    Prerequisite: Twelfth-grade high school mathematics with at least B grades or consent of instructor.

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    MATH 1180 - Calculus II


    Goals: To learn how to use the calculus of one variable and the fundamental concepts of the calculus.

    Content: Integrals of functions of one variable, sequences and series. Applications are taken mostly from the physical sciences.

    Prerequisite: MATH 1170 or consent of instructor.

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    MATH 1200 - Statistics


    Goals: To cover the fundamentals of statistical data analysis.

    Content: Elementary probability, descriptive statistics, parametric and nonparametric tests of hypotheses, analysis of variance, correlation and regression. Statistical computing will be in R.

    Prerequisite: High school algebra

    Note: Credit will not be given for more than one statistics course (MATH 1200, PSY 1340, or QMBE 1310).

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    MATH 3320 - Multivariable and Vector Calculus


    Goals: To extend concepts of calculus in two variables to the calculus of several variables.

    Content: Vector calculus, partial and total differentiation, maximum/minimum problems, multiple integration, line and surface integrals, vector and scalar fields, theorems of Green, Gauss, and Stokes.

    Taught: Fall and Spring terms

    Prerequisite: MATH 1180

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    MATH 3330 - Linear Algebra


    Goals: To gain an appreciation for how abstract structures are used to solve theoretical and practical problems.

    Content: Systems of linear equations, matrices, determinants, vector spaces and bases, transformations, eigenvectors, introduction to linear differential equations.

    Taught: Fall term.

    Prerequisite: MATH 1180 or consent of instructor.

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    MATH 3410 - Mathematical Modeling


    Goals:​ An introduction to mathematical modeling of quantitative processes in the sciences, with applications from physics, chemistry, biology, economics, etc.

    Content:​ Mathematical models of various types: differential equations (both ordinary and partial), transform techniques, statistical techniques, discrete models, numerical simulations, etc. Some content will vary depending on the interests of the students.

    Taught: Fall term, alternate years

    Prerequisite:​ MATH 1180

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    MATH 3440 - Discrete Mathematics


    Goals: To introduce the concept of the discrete as well as techniques used in higher non-continuous mathematics, providing the necessary background material required by computer scientists for algorithm analysis.

    Content: Sets and numeration, combinatorics, logic, algorithms, recursion, generating functions, graphs, and trees.

    Taught: Spring term

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    MATH 3550 - Foundations of Mathematics


    Goals: To study mathematics as a logico-deductive system and to analyze those concepts and techniques that underlie all of mathematics.

    Content: Logic, proof construction, sets, relations, functions, mathematical induction, arguments involving infinite sets, number systems, axiomatics.

    Taught: Spring term

    Prerequisite: MATH 1180

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    MATH 3560 - Modern Geometry


    Goals: To introduce the concept of model building in mathematics from both a synthetic and an axiomatic point of view.

    Content: Various geometries are studied with attention paid to what geometry is. Hilbert’s axiom system for Euclidean geometry, hyperbolic geometry, and transformations.

    Taught: Alternate years, spring term

    Prerequisite: MATH 1170

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    MATH 3720 - Differential Equations


    Goals: To learn to determine both the qualitative and quantitative properties of those functions which satisfy ordinary differential equations, using both analytic and numerical techniques.

    Content: Analytic methods of solution, numeric methods of solution, linear differential equations, series solutions, the Laplace transform, systems of differential equations, initial and boundary value problems, existence theory and applications.

    Taught: Spring term, alternate years

    Prerequisite: MATH 3320 or consent of the instructor

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    MATH 3810 - Probability and Mathematical Statistics


    Goals: An introduction to the basic topics of mathematical probability theory and statistics.

    Content: Definition of probability, probability distributions (discrete and continuous), expectation, random variables and functions of random variables. Sampling distributions and applications.

    Taught: Fall term, alternate years

    Prerequisites: MATH 1180, MATH 3320 recommended

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    MATH 5890 - Modern Algebra


    Goals: An introduction to algebraic structures: groups, rings, and fields.

    Content: An introduction to algebraic structures. Topics include normal subgroups, factor groups, and homomorphisms. Development of the elementary concepts of groups, rings, and fields.

    Taught: Fall term, alternate years

    Prerequisite: MATH 3550

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    MATH 5910 - Analysis


    Goals: To learn the language, fundamental concepts, and standard theorems of analysis. 

    Content: An introduction to real analysis with emphasis on proofs of theorems and on problem solving. Topics include properties of the real number system, functions, sequences, limits and continuity, differentiation, integration, and infinite series including sequences and series of functions.

    Taught: Fall term, alternate years

    Prerequisite: MATH 3550

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    MATH 5920 - Junior Seminar


    Goals: The student will be introduced to ideas and issues that are outside of the regular undergraduate curriculum, studying how mathematics is used in academia and industry.

    Content: Reviews of current research and projects of various mathematicians: senior math majors, guest lecturers, and department staff. Student presentations of topics from internships, independent studies, or honors projects.

    Credits: 0.5 per term

  
  •  

    MATH 5930 - Senior Seminar


    Goals: The student will be introduced to ideas and issues that are outside of the regular undergraduate curriculum, studying how mathematics is used in academia and industry.

    Content: Reviews of current research and projects of various mathematicians: senior math majors, guest lecturers, and department staff. Student presentations of topics from internships, independent studies, or honors projects.

    Credits: 0.5 per term

  
  •  

    MATH 5950 - Topics in Advanced Mathematics


    Goals: To synthesize previous work in the various areas of mathematics with the goal of putting the areas in a historical perspective and of relating them to the question of what makes up mathematics.

    Content: The content of the seminar varies from year to year depending on the instructor. Attention is paid to the history of mathematics and to filling gaps in the spectrum of mathematics presented at the undergraduate level.

    Taught: Spring term

    Prerequisite: MATH 3550, senior standing recommended

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    MGMT 1100 - Personal Power and Influence


    Goals: Student will gain insight into their implicit theories and feelings about power and influence, the resulting impact on their perception of problems and opportunities; and subsequently, how they decide upon particular courses of action.  

    Content: Students will explore power and influence dynamics as a useful tool for analyzing their surroundings and understanding themselves as actors within it. Class activities will include readings, self-assessment tools and reflective writing.

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    MGMT 3100 - Foundations of Management


    Goals: To understand basic concepts, theories, and research in management and to apply them to practical management problems. To relate the liberal arts to work, using a common theme of ethics.

    Content: The principal functional areas of management (planning, organizing, controlling, and leading) are examined in the context of organizations and groups. Ethical issues and the different views of work from various fields are examined.

    Prerequisites: Sophomore, junior, or senior standing, or consent of the instructor.

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    MGMT 3130 - Business Law


    Goals: To provide an overview of the law as it relates to the formation, operation, and completion of business transactions. The course is not only intended to assist the student who plans a career in management, but also the student interested in a legal career.

    Content: Contracts, sales, secured transactions, commercial paper, and bankruptcy.

    Prerequisite: MGMT 3100 (grade of C- or better), and junior or senior standing.

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    MGMT 3700 - Human Resource Management


    Goals: For students to learn methods for attracting, developing and retaining a workforce that ensures an organization can achieve its mission and goals in a manner such that both the organization and the employees can flourish.  

    Content: This course takes a strategic approach to Human Resource Management. Topics explored with a dual eye towards both legal requirements and best practices in a competitive labor environment include:  recruiting and selection, training and development, compensation and rewards, and retention and wellness program.

    Prerequisite: MGMT 3100 (grade of C- or better), or consent of the instructor.

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    MGMT 3720 - International Business Environment


    Goals: To provide an overview of the international business environment including key international institutions. In this course, students will explore the meaning and nature of culture as well as its influence on management functions and international business throughout the world. The course will examine dominant cultural norms in key world regions and effective cross-cultural communication and management methodologies designed to enhance international business success.

    Content: The nature and role of culture in international business and management, regional cultural norms throughout the world, international negotiating and resolution styles, cross-cultural synergy, international business ethics, international human resources management issues, and international organizations that influence business.

    Prerequisite: ECON 1100 and MGMT 3100 (grades of C- or better); junior or senior standing; or consent of the instructor.

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    MGMT 3730 - Project Management


    Goals: To guide students through fundamental project competencies and behavioral skills needed to successfully launch, lead, and realize benefits from projects in profit and nonprofit organizations.

    Content: This course aids students in understanding interpersonal issues that drive successful project outcomes. Topics covered include project integration, project scope, time and cost management, project team management, risk management and procurement management. The approach is a practical, hands-on application through case studies and class exercises.

    Prerequisite: MGMT 3100 (grade of C- or better) or consent of the instructor.

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    MGMT 3740 - Organizational Leadership


    Goals: To guide students through critical self-analysis and exploration of organizational dynamics to enhance their abilities to be effective leaders in work settings.

    Content: Students will explore personal predispositions in communication, conflict management, decision making, team behaviors, and cultural intelligence through assessment tools and in-depth discussion. The course will examine how cognitive and behavioral patterns impact efforts in team, organization and sector settings.

    Prerequisite: MGMT 3100 (grade of C- or better) or consent of the instructor.

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    MGMT 3750 - Innovation and Entrepreneurship


    Goals: To provide students with proven approaches and emerging models for creative and innovative business solutions.  

    Content: Students will engage in applied activities to develop creative skills, build components of a business plan, and explore innovation within an industry that aligns with their interests. Topics include creative mapping and cognitive processes, product/service design and redesign, rapid prototyping, new venture startup processes, and industry/market systems disruption.

    Prerequisite: MGMT 3100 (grade C- or better) or consent of the instructor.

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    MGMT 3950 - Integrative Leadership Seminar


    Goals: This is a project-based course where students will design and implement a leadership initiative of their choosing.  

    Content: The instructor will support students in the development of their project and facilitate peer coaching and collaborative reflection activities.  In institutional terms, this course represents the C of the SEEC model students learn in FYSEM: See all ideas within a web of connections, Explore those ideas, Evaluate them, and Contribute to the web of Ideas.

    Prerequisite: MGMT 1100 (grade of C- or better)

    Credits: 2

  
  •  

    MGMT 3960 - Internship with Seminar


    Goals: To provide an opportunity to apply students’ skills and knowledge in a working/learning context. To complement internships by providing discussion groups for sharing and crosschecking students’ experiences.

    Content: Students must hold an internship and will also meet once a week as a group to articulate and assess their experiences.

    Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing, or consent of the instructor. Primarily intended for economics and business majors, but other majors with administrative internships are welcome.

    Credits: 2

  
  •  

    MGMT 5860 - Strategic Management


    Goals: To learn to think strategically. To learn to work effectively on a policy setting management team. To develop knowledge and skills necessary to analyze and resolve formulation and implementation issues.

    Content: The formulation and implementation of management strategy, utilizing learning from other business courses and insights from business experiences.

    Prerequisites: MGMT 3100, MKTG 3100, FIN 3100 (grades of C- or better), and senior standing

    Credits: 4

 

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