2021-2022 Undergraduate Bulletin 
    
    Dec 07, 2022  
2021-2022 Undergraduate Bulletin [Archived Bulletin]

Courses


 
  
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    THTR 3410 - Stage Makeup


    Goals: To learn the techniques, theory, and application of theatrical makeup. To develop a working knowledge of materials and methods essential to use of principal types of theatrical makeup.

    Content: Makeup design and application in relation to character development and the overall production concept. The course focuses on advanced paint techniques and prosthetics.

    Taught: Alternate Years.

    Prerequisite: THTR 1420 or permission of instructor

    Credits: 4

  
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    THTR 3440 - Scene and Lighting Design


    Goals: To develop an awareness of the principles and techniques of the scene and lighting designer’s art. To qualify the student with appropriate skills for work as a beginning  designer.

    Content: Script analysis, concept development, visual research, and the use of design elements in the service of coherent and unified production. An exploration of the variety of design styles and the development of rendering, drafting (construction and light plot), collage, and model making skills.

    Taught: Alternate years

    Prerequisite: THTR 1420 (grade of C- or better) or instructor permission

    Credits: 4

  
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    THTR 3450 - Costume Design


    Goals: To introduce principles and practices in the design and execution of costumes for the stage. To prepare the beginning costume designer.

    Content: Script and visual research and use of design principles to create costumes appropriate to both individual character and the production as a whole. Summary of development of western dress, figure drawing, rendering skills, and research methods together with the nature and decoration of materials, pattern development, draping, assembly, and finishing methods.

    Taught: Alternate years.

    Prerequisite: THTR 1420 or instructor permission.

    Credits: 4

  
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    THTR 3700 - Children’s Theatre


    Goals: To provide a combined study of the theories and practical processes involved in creating and presenting theatre for children.

    Content: Participants for the course are selected by audition to prepare and tour a participation theatre play for children. In addition to the rehearsal and performance components of the course, there are units of study in script analysis, the development of theatre for children, types of theatre for children, performing for and with children, and an introduction to the roles that theatre can play in an educational setting.

    Taught: Annually, winter term.

    Prerequisite: Course participants must be cast in the touring children’s play.

    Credits: 4

  
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    THTR 3750 - Creative Drama and Creative Dance for the Classroom Teacher


    Goals: To introduce the theories and methods of developing successful lessons in creative drama and creative dance for the classroom teacher. 

    Content: Theories, history and evolution of creative drama and creative dance as a subject area. Methods and considerations in planning lessons for different age and ability groups. Resources for the classroom teacher. Ways to integrate creative drama and creative dance with different subject areas. 

    Taught: Periodically in summer term

    Credits: 4

  
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    THTR 3800 - Dance Ensemble


    Goal: To provide performance experience in contemporary concert dance. To learn modern and jazz technique and repertoire work from professional choreographers in the Twin Cities area and explore the choreographic process. Students will perform two concerts during the academic year.

    Content: Intermediate and advanced modern and jazz technique will be taught which will be comprised of warm ups; strength training; yoga; center floor sequences; across floor combinations; and partnering techniques. Emphasis will be placed on rehearsals for development of professional and student dance works.

    Taught: Annually. This is a two credit class that may be repeated.

    Prerequisite: Fall audition.

    Credits: 2

  
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    THTR 5160 - Special Topics in Theatre Studies


    Goals: The critical study of a specific historical movement, theatre company, and/or theatre artist.

    Content: Intensive analysis of texts (both written, performance, and historical texts) in their cultural context. Topics will vary.

    Taught: Alternate years.

    Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing, or permission of the instructor.

    Credits: 4

  
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    THTR 5400 - Managing the Performing Arts


    Goals: To introduce the student to the economic and administrative issues that confront a performing arts organization. To explore the methods, materials, and policies used by successful managers in preserving their organizations.

    Content: Units of study on organizational development, staffing procedures, fundraising systems, accounting methods, publicity techniques, and audience development.

    Taught: Alternate years.

    Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing.

    Credits: 4

  
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    THTR 5520 - Stage Direction


    Goals: To train the student in the essential principles of directing through play analysis, practical exercises, and scene staging.

    Content: Emphasis on practical application through the staging of selected scenes from the modern theatre and exercises in composition, interpretation, and movement. Serious and comic texts, staging for traditional and open-stage forms, and working with script, actors, and designers.

    Taught: Annually.

    Prerequisites: Junior standing, THTR 1230, THTR 1420, THTR 3120, and consent of instructor.

    Note: This course is restricted to major students. Enrollment is limited.

    Credits: 4

  
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    THTR 5910 - Senior Theatre Project and Seminar


    Goals: To provide senior theatre majors with the opportunity to demonstrate their professional abilities through the creation of a substantial research or production project and to prepare students for the transition to careers and/or graduate school.

    Content: This seminar course focuses on the development of the performing arts professional. Topics include issues in ethics, union and professional association membership, career planning strategies, graduate schools and advanced training opportunities, parallel industry careers, and analyzing growth and change in the performing arts. Parallel to these seminars participants will also be developing their senior project. Techniques for the written and visual documentation of a performance will be examined as well as individual meetings with the project advisor.

    Taught: Annually.

    Prerequisites: This is a two semester, two credits per semester course sequence. Seniors must complete both semesters. Only theatre arts majors are eligible to enroll for the senior project seminar. An approved project is required prior to enrolling. Approval of department chair is required.

    Credits: 2 credits fall; 2 credits spring

  
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    TSEM 3010 - Transfer Seminar


    Goals: To help transfer students develop the research skills they will need for advanced undergraduate work; to help transfer students further orient to Hamline’s academic resources and to the Hamline community.

    Content: In this course students will develop a research proposal in their discipline while exploring relevant academic resources, articulating their academic goals, and participating in the scholarly life of the community. 

    Credits: 4

  
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    WGS 1010 - Foundations of Women’s and Gender Studies


    Goals: To introduce students to the interdisciplinary academic field of women’s and gender studies, including an introduction to feminism and feminist theory. It is designed to raise awareness of women’s status and women’s gender diversity; to critically examine academic disciplines and social practices through the lens of feminist theory; to recover past achievements of women and survey the work women now do; to expand personal perspectives; to consider opportunities for social transformation; and to provide a basis for critical evaluation of future learning.

    Content: Survey of key concepts and subjects related to women, gender, and feminism in the interdisciplinary field of women’s and gender studies. Provides students with foundational knowledge about how gender intersects with multiple categories, such as race, ethnicity, social class, age, and sexuality.

    Taught: Annually

    Credits: 4

  
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    WGS 1500 - Topics in Women’s and Gender Studies


    Goals: To provide introductory study of one or more subject areas relating to women’s studies.

    Content:  Focus varies.  Previous topics have included courses such as “Women and Popular Culture,” “The F Word: Gender, Power, and Privilege in America,” and “Socially (Ir)responsible Fashion.”

    Note: A student may register for this course more than once for different topics.

    Credits: 4

  
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    WGS 3500 - Topics in Women’s and Gender Studies


    Goals: To study in depth one or more subject areas relating to women’s studies.

    Content: Focus varies.  Previous topics have included courses such as “Engendering Justice,”  “Women, Conflict, and Social Change,” “Transforming a Rape Culture,” “Sex and Gender in the Popular Romance Novel,” and “Women Organizing for Social Change.”

    Prerequisite: WSTD 1010 or equivalent, or permission of instructor

    Note: A student may register for this course more than once for different topics.

    Credits: 4

  
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    WGS 3800 - Inside-Out Prison Exchange


    Crosslisted: Also listed as CFST 3800, CJFS 3800, and SOCJ 3800

    The Inside-Out prison exchange program brings incarcerated individuals and Hamline undergraduates together to take a course behind prison walls to investigate issues related to crime, justice, freedom, inequality, and other social justice issues. Both inside and outside students will read various texts and write response papers throughout the semester. Students will work together to complete a class project. The course will take place at a Minnesota Department of Corrections Institution. This course is open to all Hamline undergraduate students who meet the prerequisite requirements.

    Prerequisites: One of the following courses: CJFS 1120, CFST 1100, SOC 1110, SOCJ 1100, WSTD 1010, and at least sophomore standing. Additionally, all students must complete an essay and interview to obtain instructor approval.

    Note: The department offering the course varies by term. It may be offered under CFST, CJFS, SOCJ, and WSTD.

    Credits: 4

  
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    WGS 3850 - Feminist Theory


    Goals: To examine feminist theoretical work representing the major multidisciplinary areas of feminist theory. To survey intersectional feminist theory across the disciplines, and provide an overview of historical and ideological trends in feminist thought. WSTD 3850 furthers students’ thinking from WSTD 1010 in preparation for additional upper-division coursework in women’s studies including the research seminar.

    Content: Discussion and analysis of works representing the major areas of intersectional feminist/womanist thought theory across the disciplines.

    Taught: Alternate years

    Prerequisite: WSTD 1010 or equivalent, or permission of instructor

    Credits: 4

  
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    WGS 5900 - Research Seminar


    Goals: To examine significant developments in feminist/womanist theory and to provide a synthesis of what women’s studies majors have learned and an opportunity for them to share their research.

    Content: Student-generated research topics and presentations, with an emphasis on the application of feminist theories.

    Taught: Alternate years

    Prerequisite: WSTD 3850 or permission of instructor

    Credits: 4

  
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    WRIT 1500 - Introduction to Creative Writing


    Goals: This course is open to all students interested in creative writing. Students are introduced to the practice of writing and reading as creative writers in three genres: poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction. They also begin to develop a writing practice.

    Content: Students engage critically and creatively with assigned texts as writers and readers, participate in class discussions, and begin to develop a writing practice. The course combines lecture, discussion, readings in and across genres, writing exercises, and other assignments.

    Taught: Fall and Spring

    Prerequisite: FYW 1120 or its equivalent

    Credits: 4

  
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    WRIT 3110 - Forms and Elements of the Craft: Poetry


    Goals: In this course students explore the fundamental elements of the craft of poetry used by published writers of poetry, including image, metaphor, simile, rhythm, thyme, voice, tone, and the syntactical structures of the line, the sentence, and the stanza. They also explore the various forms in poetry used by published poets, including free verse and received forms such as the sonnet, the sestina, the villanelle, etc. They apply insights concerning these elements and forms to their own work and the work of their peers. They also revise original work that has benefited from instructor and/or workshop feedback.

    Content: Attention is paid to the ways in which poets integrate these elements into the form of the poem. The course combines lecture, discussion, reading, writing exercises and experiments, and other assignments.

    Taught: Annually

    Prerequisites: FYW 1120 or its equivalent and WRIT 1500.  WRIT 1500 may be taken simultaneously with WRIT 3110.

    Credits: 4

  
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    WRIT 3120 - Forms and Elements of the Craft: Fiction


    Goals: In this course students explore the fundamental elements of the craft of fiction used by published writers of fiction—including characterization, plot, POV, voice, setting, dialogue, structure, detail, theme, tension, and conflict—and apply insights concerning these elements to their own work and the work of their peers. They also revise original work that has benefited from instructor and/or workshop feedback.

    Content: Students build skills through writing exercises and the study of contemporary and classic fiction. The course combines lecture, discussion, reading, writing exercises and experiments, and other assignments.

    Taught: Annually

    Prerequisites: FYW 1120 or its equivalent and WRIT 1500. WRIT 1500 may be taken simultaneously with WRIT 3120.

    Credits: 4

  
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    WRIT 3130 - Forms and Elements of the Craft: Creative Nonfiction


    Goals: In this course students explore the various forms of creative nonfiction used by published writers of creative nonfiction, including memoir, lyric essay, personal essay, literary journalism, experimental/hybrid, and the nonfiction short. They also explore the fundamental elements of the craft of creative nonfiction used by published writers of CNF, including the essayistic question, voice, structure, scene, reflection, and subtext. They apply insights concerning these elements and forms to their own work and the work of their peers. They also revise original work that has benefited from instructor and/or workshop feedback.

    Content: Students build skills through writing exercises and assignments and the study of contemporary and classic creative nonfiction. The course combines lecture, discussion, reading, writing exercises and experiments, and other assignments.

    Taught: Annually

    Prerequisites: FYW 1120 or its equivalent and WRIT 1500. WRIT 1500 may be taken simultaneously with WRIT 3130.

    Credits: 4

  
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    WRIT 3140 - Forms and Elements of the Craft: Digital Storytelling


    Goals: In this course students will explore various forms of digital storytelling that combine established practices of literary arts with digital media tools of video and audio production. Students will study short form video and audio works of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry as they seek to discover new and emerging genres. They will also explore fundamental elements of the craft of digital storytelling including screenwriting, cinematography, editing, sound design, and research. Students will apply insights concerning these forms and elements to their own work and the work of their peers. They will also revise original work that has benefitted from instructor and/or workshop feedback.

    Content: Students build skills through creative and technical exercises and the study of contemporary works of digital storytelling. Students will also study precursors to digital storytelling such as cinema, radio, the graphic novel, and more. The course combines lecture, discussion, readings, screenings, creative exercises and experiments, and other assignments.

    Prerequisite: DMA 1100 or WRIT 1500 with a grade of C- or higher.

    Credits: 4

  
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    WRIT 3320 - Fantasy Writing


    Goals: in this course students explore and practice the fictional elements that allow readers to suspend their disbelief and enter a truly immersive fantasy. They learn how to create convincing characters and worlds, consider how structure affects narrative, and practice controlling the reader’s experience through point of view, description, and language.

    Content: Students read contemporary short stories in the field and build skills by writing short stories in different subgenres of fantasy, culminating in the revision of one of these stories. 

    Prerequisite: WRIT 1500

    Credits: 4

  
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    WRIT 3400 - Writing for Kids and Teens


    Goals: In this course students explore and practice writing for children and young adults. They study different genres—picture book, middle-grade and YA fiction, poetry, and nonfiction—mining the texts for lessons on craft which they apply to their own writing.

    Content: Students read select texts across the genres and experiment by writing in these genres. They write and revise a final project integrating revision feedback.

    Prerequisite: WRIT 1500

    Credits: 4

  
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    WRIT 3450 - Runestone: Introduction to Literary Publishing


    Goals: In this dynamic, hands-on class, students are immersed in the operations of putting together and promoting an issue of a national undergraduate literary magazine.

    Content: Students read, analyze, discuss, and select submissions for the next issue of Runestone, Hamline’s award-winning online national undergraduate literary magazine. In addition, they study the history of the mission-driven independent literary journal and its cultural role of discovering new voices; study journals publishing today and craft essays that illuminate the contemporary conversation about their genre; complete short writing exercises; and revise and prepare one manuscript to send to another national undergraduate review. They also explore different ways of promoting the magazine: tweeting, blogging, posting. 

    Taught: Once per year

    Prerequisite: One Forms & Elements course (WRIT 3110, 3120, or 3130) with a grade of C- or better, or concurrent registration

    Credits: 4

  
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    WRIT 3510 - Poetry Workshop


    Goals: In this course students continue to explore and practice the fundamental forms and elements of poetry. They write and revise original work and provide craft-based written and oral feedback on the works of their peers.

    Content: Students build skills through writing and revision of poetry and through giving, receiving, and acting on craft-based written and oral feedback. The course combines writing, reading student work and some outside work, occasional exercises and experiments, and craft-driven workshop discussion.

    Taught: Annually

    Prerequisites: WRIT 1500 and WRIT 3110, 3120, or 3130.  WRIT 3110, 3120, and 3130 may be taken simultaneously with WRIT 3510.

    Credits: 4

  
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    WRIT 3520 - Fiction Workshop


    Goals: In this course students continue to explore and practice the fundamental elements of fiction. They write and revise original work and provide craft-based written and oral feedback on the works of their peers.

    Content: Students build skills through writing and revising and through giving, receiving, and acting on craft-based written and oral feedback. The course combines writing, reading student work and some outside work, occasional exercises and experiments, and craft-driven workshop discussion.

    Taught: Annually

    Prerequisites: WRIT 1500 and WRIT 3110, 3120, or 3130.  WRIT 3110, 3120, and 3130 may be taken simultaneously with WRIT 3520.

    Credits: 4

  
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    WRIT 3530 - Creative Nonfiction Workshop


    Goals: In this course students continue to explore and practice the fundamental forms and elements of creative nonfiction. They write and revise original work and provide craft-based written and oral feedback on the works of their peers.

    Content: Students build skills through writing and revision of creative nonfiction and through giving, receiving, and acting on craft-based written and oral feedback. The course combines writing, reading student work and some outside work, occasional exercises and experiments, and craft-driven workshop discussion.

    Taught: Annually

    Prerequisites: WRIT 1500 and WRIT 3110, 3120, or 3130. WRIT 3110, 3120, and 3130 may be taken simultaneously with WRIT 3530.

    Credits: 4

  
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    WRIT 3540 - Multi-Genre Workshop


    Goals: In this course students continue to explore and practice the fundamental forms and elements of the genres offered in the course description: poetry and fiction, poetry and CNF, CNF and fiction, hybrid forms, or a mix of all three genres.  Students also study the connecting threads and overlaps between and among genres and may experiment with cross-genre and/or hybrid work. They write and revise original work and provide craft-based written and oral feedback on the works of their peers.

    Content: Students build skills through writing and revision of their own genre of choice and of other genres through giving, receiving, and acting on craft-based written and oral feedback. The course combines writing, reading student work and some outside work, occasional exercises and experiments, and craft-driven workshop discussion.

    Taught: Annually

    Prerequisites: WRIT 1500 and WRIT 3110, 3120, or 3130.  WRIT 3110, 3120, and 3130 may be taken simultaneously with WRIT 3540.

    Credits: 4

  
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    WRIT 5960 - Senior Seminar in Creative Writing


    Goals: In this multi-genre class students will expand their knowledge of themselves as writers, of the craft and process of writing, of the role and value of research in creative writing, and of ways of effectively integrating research into the text.

    Content: Students read and discuss literary texts that incorporate research done by the authors. They conduct research on subjects of their choice and integrate that research into their own creative text(s), which includes the writing and revising of a final project in their chosen genre. They select a research-based text and present lessons learned from that text to the class. The course combines discussion, reading and writing assignments, student presentations, and practice.

    Taught: Annually

    Prerequisites: WRIT 3110 or WRIT 3120 or WRIT 3130 and two workshops (WRIT 3510, 3520, 3530, 3540); Creative Writing major in junior or senior year.

    Credits: 4

 

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