2021-2022 Undergraduate Bulletin 
    
    Dec 07, 2022  
2021-2022 Undergraduate Bulletin [Archived Bulletin]

Courses


 
  
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    PBHL 1200 - Introduction to Infectious Diseases and Public Health Microbiology


    Goals: To introduce students to the fundamental properties of microbes and their role as disease causing agents; to recognize and define scientific terms commonly used when describing the causes and transmission of microbial diseases; to become familiar with scientific approaches and techniques used to study diseases and their impact on public health.

    Content: Structure and function of bacterial cells and viruses, basic mechanisms of microbial virulence, reservoirs and transmission routes of infectious agents, techniques to identify and monitor microbial diseases, food safety, discussion of major epidemics and their impact on public health and society.

    Taught: Every other year

    Credits: 4

  
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    PBHL 3100 - Epidemiology


    Goals: Epidemiology is the study of the determinants and distribution of health-related states or events in populations. This course will introduce students to the principle methods and approaches of epidemiology, and how epidemiology contributes to the understanding and improvement of population health.

    Content: Etiology and pathophysiology of infectious and chronic diseases and conditions, patterns of disease, models of disease spread, risk factors and prevention methods, outbreak investigation, surveillance and monitoring, screening, design of investigations and interventions. Current epidemiological research will be analyzed using published literature.

    Taught: Annually

    Prerequisite: PBHL 1100

    Credits: 4

  
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    PBHL 3200 - Topics in Health Equity


    Goals: The purpose of this course is to provide students with an advanced engagement with 1) the social determinants of health, 2) health disparities, and 3) strategies to address the social determinants of health and reduce health disparities through a health equity and anti-racist approach.

    Content: Students will gain a better understanding of research on health disparities and interventions to promote health equity and antiracism.

    Prerequisite: PBHL 1100 with a grade of C- or better, or instructor permission

    Credits: 4

  
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    PBHL 3500 - Nutrition for Health and Fitness


    Goals: To acquaint students with the fundamental concepts of nutrition, and develop the skills needed to perform basic dietary analyses and design practical nutritional strategies to address various nutritional needs and challenges; to familiarize students with the research methodologies used to investigate nutrition, enable students to evaluate claims based on empirical evidence, and help students appreciate the impact of advances in nutrition research on individuals and society.

    Content: This course will give students an understanding of the role of nutrition in overall health and wellness, disease prevention and treatment, and in athletic performance, recovery, and training adaptation. Topics covered will include: basic human metabolism; energy intake and energy balance; macronutrients, micronutrients, and recommendations for intake based on individual needs; how diet contributes to development and progression, as well as prevention and treatment, of many chronic diseases; how to evaluate dietary claims and the latest “fad” diets; dietary assessment methods; changing dietary needs across the lifespan; how diet affects physical performance in sport/exercise training and competition; and the role of nutrition in recovery from and adaptation to exercise training at the cellular and molecular level.

    Taught: Spring term

    Prerequisite: BIOL 1120 or BIOL 1510 or BIOL 1520 with a grade of C- or better

    Credits: 4

  
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    PBHL 5020 - Global Health


    Goals: To introduce students to the dynamic field of global health and cultivate an appreciation for the pursuit of health equity for all people.

    Content: This interdisciplinary course is designed to introduce students to the field of global health and should be viewed as a culmination of the public health major and an opportunity to apply all you have learned in a global context. This course aims to frame global health’s collection of problems and actions with a particular biosocial perspective. It first develops a toolkit of analytical approaches and then uses them to examine historical and contemporary global health initiatives with careful attention to a critical sociology of knowledge. We will investigate what the field of global health may include, how global health problems are defined and constructed, and how global health interventions play out in expected and unexpected ways.

    Prerequisites: PBHL 1100, PBHL 3100, and Junior or Senior standing

    Credits: 4

  
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    PBHL 5400 - Topics in Public Health


    Goals: Examine a current topic in public health by reading and discussing current research literature.

    Content: Critical discussion and analysis of a current topic in Public Health.

    Prerequisite: ANTH 3300, EXSC 3300, GLOB 3020, or SOC 3930 (research methods)

    Credits: 4

  
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    PBHL 5950 - Senior Seminar


    Goals: This course provides an overarching capstone experience to seniors graduating with a degree in Public Health Sciences. To synthesize and apply the concepts and approaches from the broad field of Public Health Sciences learned through prior coursework and the internship or research experience; to prepare for the next steps in the academic or career path; and to engage with research, collect and analyze public health data, and create public health educational and outreach materials.

    Content: In this course you will have the opportunity to relate what you have learned during your Public Health Sciences major to an advanced Public Health issue. Embedded in this process you will learn how to conduct Public Health research such as how to engage with communities, communicate professionally, prepare and conduct research, analyze research, translate research into outreach materials, and communicate public health outcomes in a public forum.

    Taught: Fall and Spring

    Prerequisites: Senior standing. The internship or research experience should either be completed prior to enrolling in this course, or significantly underway. 

    Credits: 4

  
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    PHED 1800 - Fitness


    Goals: To acquire enough mastery of the skills, strategies, and rules to be able to enjoy participation for a lifetime. To understand the principles of physical fitness.

    Outdoor Activity

    This course is not repeatable for credit.

    Credits: 1

  
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    PHIL 1120 - General Philosophy


    Content: Selected important philosophic works; the main problems of philosophy, the natures of reality, valuing, and knowing.

    Credits: 4

  
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    PHIL 1130 - Logic


    Content: Formal and informal reasoning, deductive and inductive; traditional and symbolic techniques for distinguishing correct from incorrect reasoning.

    Credits: 4

  
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    PHIL 1140 - Ethics


    Content: The concepts of goodness, right, duty, obligation, responsibility, and freedom; important moral theories of the Western tradition; contemporary moral issues in light of these theories.

    Credits: 4

  
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    PHIL 1145 - Development Ethics in Jamaica


    Goals: This course examines ethical issues related to “third world” or “developing” nations.

    Content: After a week of study on campus, we will travel to rural Jamaica on an Operation Classroom work team, living and working with locals on a school construction project. Students will study and directly experience ethical issues connected to development, combining service learning with academic reflection. We return to campus for the last week of the term to complete independent research, writing, and presentation of work.

    Taught: Alternate years, winter term.

    Credits: 4

  
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    PHIL 1250 - Introduction to African Philosophy


    Content: Definitions of African Philosophy, discussions of ethnophilosophy, problems of language in Africa, and connections with African American and feminist philosophies.

    Taught: Annually.

    Credits: 4

  
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    PHIL 3150 - Ancient Greek Philosophy


    Content: The main problems of philosophy, the natures of reality, valuing and knowing, through the works of important ancient Greek philosophers, especially the pre-Socratics, Plato, and Aristotle.

    Credits: 4

  
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    PHIL 3160 - Modern Philosophy: Descartes to Kant


    Content: The main problems of philosophy, the natures of reality, valuing, and knowing, through the works of influential European philosophers of the 17th and 18th centuries, especially Descartes, Hobbes, Hume, and Kant.

    Credits: 4

  
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    PHIL 3250 - Feminist Philosophy


    Content: An examination of major areas of contemporary feminist philosophy, with special attention to the interaction between multiple forms of oppression, including racism, homophobia, and class-based oppression.

    Taught: Alternate years.

    Prerequisites: WSTD 1010 or PHIL 1120 or PHIL 1140.

    Credits: 4

  
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    PHIL 3320 - Philosophy of Religion


    Content: The nature and problems of religious thought including the existence of God, religious experience, faith, and reason.

    Taught: Alternate years.

    Credits: 4

  
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    PHIL 3330 - Social, Political, and Legal Philosophy


    Content: Philosophical issues in social, political, and legal systems, including problems such as the justification of power and the development of the concept of human rights.

    Credits: 4

  
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    PHIL 3340 - Philosophy of Art


    Content: Aesthetic issues from the point of view of the creator as well as appreciator, including questions of artistic truth, meaning, beauty, value, criticism, and judgment applied to the range of art media.

    Credits: 4

  
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    PHIL 3360 - Philosophy of Nonviolence


    Goals:  To understand the concepts, principles, and practices of nonviolence.

    Content: Focus on understanding the concepts, principles, and practices of nonviolence emphasizing theorists and practitioners of nonviolent direct action including Mohandas Gandhi, Martin Luther King, Jr., Thich Nhat Hanh, and others, attentive to the contexts in which they emerge.  Course participants will pursue independent research on nonviolence for presentation to the seminar.

    Credits: 4

  
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    PHIL 3370 - Philosophy of Science


    Content: Philosophical issues of the sciences, including questions of scientific progress and rationality, our understanding of the physical world, and values and objectivity in the sciences.

    Taught: Alternate years.

    Credits: 4

  
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    PHIL 3380 - Concepts of Nature


    Content: An examination of some of the different ways people have thought about the natural world and our relationship to it. Some of the views discussed will be: nature as a mechanism, a divine creation, and a source of values. We will consider multicultural, feminist, and postmodern challenges to the modern scientific conception of nature.

    Taught: Alternate years.

    Credits: 4

  
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    PHIL 5550 - Knowledge, Truth, and Language


    Content: Questions of epistemology, including the nature of knowledge, the role of experience in knowing, the role of reason, the limits of knowledge, and the concept of meaning.

    Prerequisite: PHIL 3160 or consent of the instructor.

    Credits: 4

  
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    PHIL 5560 - Metaphysics


    Content: The concepts of being, reality, existence, essence, nature, causation, and reason together with their implications for knowledge and values.

    Prerequisites: PHIL 3150 and PHIL 5550, or, PHIL 3160 and PHIL 5550, or consent of the instructor.

    Credits: 4

  
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    PHIL 5750 - Contemporary Ethical Theory: Justice and the Good Life


    Content: Advanced value theory, broadly conceived, studied through selected classical and contemporary sources.

    Prerequisite: Philosophy major or minor, or consent of the instructor.

    Credits: 4

  
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    PHYS 1110 - Energy, Environment, and the Economy (with Lab)


    Goals: To investigate, for nonscience students, availability of energy in the world, environmental concerns, and the supply-demand aspects of our nation’s economy.

    Content: Conceptual understanding and measurement of relevant physical quantities; the impact of fossil fuels, nuclear power, solar and other “alternative” forms of energy on air and water quality; the economy and lifestyles; the fragile world energy balance; research in energy and various models for extrapolation into the future.

    Prerequisite: High school algebra

    NOTE: Students must concurrently register for a lecture and a corresponding 0-credit lab section of this course.

    Credits: 4

  
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    PHYS 1120 - Astronomy (with Lab)


    Goals: To develop scientific observation and investigation skills that will help us make sense of the night sky, and in the process share amazing discoveries about the universe.

    Content: Ancient astronomy with the naked eye, motion of the planets, the invention of the telescope, stars and their life cycles, black holes, star clusters, galaxies and their evolution, large-scale structure, and the beginning of the universe.

    Prerequisite: High school algebra

    NOTE: Students must concurrently register for a lecture and a corresponding 0-credit lab section of this course.

    Credits: 4

  
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    PHYS 1130 - Physics for Poets (with Lab)


    Goals: To introduce non-science students to the conceptual development and philosophical implications of some aspects of physics, allow students to gain insights into the practice of science, and give students experience with problem solving.

    Content: Topics will vary with instructor but may include motion, energy, solids, heat, sound, light, electricity, magnetism, atoms, the nucleus, particles, and astronomy. The laboratory will include a variety of experiences designed to allow students to practice investigative science and gain hands-on experience.

    Prerequisite: High school algebra

    NOTE: Students must concurrently register for a lecture and a corresponding 0-credit lab section of this course.

    Credits: 4

  
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    PHYS 1140 - Physics of Sound and Music


    Goals: To introduce non-science majors to the physical description of the oscillations and resonances involved in the production and detection of sound and music.

    Content: Wave phenomena including propagation and interference, frequency analysis of sounds including music, theory of instruments, biological generation, and detection of sound.

    Prerequisite: High school algebra

    Credits: 4

  
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    PHYS 1150 - Algebra-based Physics I (with Lab)


    Goals: To introduce students to the basic concepts of physics to develop skills in formulating and solving both theoretical and experimental physics problems in the areas of mechanics and thermodynamics.

    Content: The topics of kinematics, Newton’s second law, energy, and momentum will be covered both in translation and rotation, simple harmonic motion and elasticity, fluids, gravitation, and thermodynamics.

    This course is primarily intended for students intending to pursue careers in biology or other health-related fields.

    Taught: Fall term

    Prerequisites: High school algebra and elementary trigonometry

    NOTE: Students must concurrently register for a lecture and a corresponding 0-credit lab section of this course.

    Credits: 4

  
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    PHYS 1160 - Algebra-based Physics II (with Lab)


    This course is primarily intended for students intending to pursue careers in biology or other health-related fields.

    Goals: To introduce students to the basic concepts of physics to develop skills in formulating and solving both theoretical and experimental physics problems in the areas of waves, electricity and magnetism, electronics and optics.

    Content: Topics include waves and sound, electricity and magnetism, DC and AC circuits, and optics.

    Taught: Spring term

    Prerequisite: PHYS 1150

    NOTE: Students must concurrently register for a lecture and a corresponding 0-credit lab section of this course.

    Credits: 4

  
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    PHYS 1230 - General Physics I (with Lab)


    This course is primarily intended for students intending to pursue careers in physics, engineering, chemistry, biochemistry or mathematics.

    Goals: To introduce students to the basic concepts of physics to develop skills in formulating and solving both theoretical and experimental physics problems in the areas of mechanics and thermodynamics using calculus.

    Content: The topics of kinematics, Newton’s second law, energy, and momentum will be covered both in translation and rotation, simple harmonic motion and elasticity, fluids, gravitation, and thermodynamics.

    Taught: Fall term

    Prerequisite: MATH 1170 or concurrent registration

    NOTE: Students must concurrently register for a lecture and a corresponding 0-credit lab section of this course.

    Credits: 4

  
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    PHYS 1240 - General Physics II (with Lab)


    This course is primarily intended for students intending to pursue careers in physics, engineering, chemistry, biochemistry or mathematics.

    Goals: To introduce students to the basic concepts of physics to develop skills in formulating and solving both theoretical and experimental physics problems in the areas of waves, electricity and magnetism, electronics and optics using calculus.

    Content: Topics include waves and sound, electricity and magnetism, DC and AC circuits, and optics.

    Taught: Spring term

    Prerequisites: PHYS 1150 or PHYS 1230, and MATH 1180 or concurrent registration

    NOTE: Students must concurrently register for a lecture and a corresponding 0-credit lab section of this course.

    Credits: 4

  
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    PHYS 3110 - Engineering Mechanics: Statics


    Goals: To develop the conceptual and mathematical skills to solve real-world statics problems in three dimensions that are representative of what engineers regularly experience.

    Content: Vector analysis, forces and moments in equilibrium, rigid body constraints, shear and bending moments, friction, moments of inertia, concentrated and distributed loads, trusses, frames and beams.

    Taught: Alternate years, fall term

    Prerequisites: PHYS 1150 or PHYS 1230, and MATH 1180, or instructor permission

    Credits: 4

  
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    PHYS 3120 - Engineering Mechanics: Dynamics


    Goals: To develop the conceptual and mathematical skills to solve real-world dynamics problems in three dimensions that are representative of what engineers regularly experience.

    Content: Rectilinear and curvilinear kinematics, forces and moments, work and energy, impulse and momentum, general and relative motion, and kinetics of rigid bodies in two and three dimensions.

    Taught: Alternate years, spring term

    Prerequisite: PHYS 3110 or instructor permission

    Credits: 4

  
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    PHYS 3200 - Energy Resources and the Environment


    Goals: To prepare the student with a scientific understanding of global, national, and local energy resources and their effects on the environment.

    Content: This course will examine current fossil fuel (coal, oil, natural gas) use by the world and anthropogenic climate forcing. Also included is an introduction to carbon-free energy sources that include nuclear power and a multitude of sustainable energy resources such as conservation, solar, and wind.

    Taught: Every other year

    Prerequisite: PHYS 1160 or 1240 or concurrent registration

    Credits: 4

  
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    PHYS 3520 - Physical Optics (with Lab)


    Goals: To introduce students to the study of optical phenomena interpreted in terms of a wave theory of light.

    Content: Mathematical description of waves and how these waves interact with matter. Theories are developed to explain interference, diffraction, and polarization and are used as a basis for measurements in the laboratory.

    Taught: Alternate years, spring term

    Prerequisite: PHYS 3540 or instructor permission

    NOTE: Students must concurrently register for a lecture and a corresponding 0-credit lab section of this course.

    Credits: 4

  
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    PHYS 3540 - Modern Physics (with Lab)


    Goals: To understand the developments of the late 19th and early 20th century in the field of physics.

    Content: Relativity, the discovery of the electron, the quantum nature of light, the wave nature of particles, the Heisenberg uncertainty principle, and Schrödinger wave mechanics. The lab will introduce the computer control of instrumentation, computer data acquisition, and computer modeling of data. Students will perform several famous Modern Physics experiments and will do a semester-long project to plan a modernized version of one of the seminal experiments in Modern Physics.

    Taught: Fall term

    Prerequisites: PHYS 1240, and MATH 3320 or concurrent registration

    NOTE: Students must concurrently register for a lecture and a corresponding 0-credit lab section of this course.

    Credits: 4

  
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    PHYS 3600 - Mathematical and Computational Methods in Physics and Engineering (with Lab)


    Goals: To introduce and demonstrate the use of mathematical and computational methods important in physics and engineering.

    Content:  Physics and engineering applications associated with ordinary and partial differential equations, Laplace transforms, linear algebra, vector calculus, Fourier analysis, complex analysis, numeric analysis, probability & statistics.

    Taught: Spring term

    Prerequisites: PHYS 3540, and MATH 3720 or concurrent registration

    NOTE: Students must concurrently register for a lecture and a corresponding 0-credit lab section of this course.

    Credits: 4

  
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    PHYS 3700 - Condensed Matter Physics


    Goals: To introduce students to the concepts of condensed matter physics.

    Content: The study of crystalline and noncrystalline structures; the free electron gas; Fermi surfaces; energy bands; semiconductors; superconductors; magnetism; dielectrics; surfaces and nanostructures.

    Taught: Alternate years, fall term

    Prerequisite: PHYS 3540 or instructor permission

    Credits: 4

  
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    PHYS 3750 - Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics


    Goals: To develop a fundamental understanding of the principles of thermodynamics and statistical mechanics that allows a variety of applications to be surveyed in the latter part of the course.

    Content: The laws of thermodynamics and other conventional thermodynamic concepts such as heat, work, entropy, enthalpy, heat capacity, and the equipartition theorem are introduced. Adiabatic, isothermal, isobaric, and nonequilibrium processes are studied. Topics include the equations of state for non-ideal gases, Maxwell’s relations, kinetic theory, the Maxwell distribution of molecular velocities, magnetic materials, blackbody radiation, phase transitions, phase diagrams, ensembles, and the partition function. Classical and quantum statistics are studied; the Maxwell-Boltzmann, Bose-Einstein, and Fermi-Dirac distributions are examined.

    Taught: Alternate years, fall term

    Prerequisite: PHYS 3540 or instructor permission

    Credits: 4

  
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    PHYS 3800 - Electronics and Instrumentation (with Lab)


    Goals: To explore the fundamentals of analog and digital electronics, to explore their applications in designs used in interfacing and controlling experiments, and to gain experience with common and advanced instrumentation.

    Content: Design, predict behavior, and build analog and digital control circuits. Circuit elements will include passive and active components including transistors; op-amps; digital logic and interfacial components such as temperature, ADC, and DAC circuits. Emphasis will be placed on building practical circuits needed to control and measure experimental parameters.

    Taught: Alternate years, spring term

    Prerequisite: PHYS 3540 or instructor permission

    NOTE: Students must concurrently register for a lecture and a corresponding 0-credit lab section of this course.

    Credits: 4

  
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    PHYS 5200 - Renewable Energy


    Goals: To investigate renewable energy collection, conversion, transport, and storage systems and technology.

    Content: Principles, designs, and economics of renewable energy: photovoltaics, photocatalysis, solar thermal conversion, wind power, fuel cells, batteries, capacitors, electrical energy transport and storage, and smart grid.

    Taught: Alternate years

    Prerequisite: PHYS 1160 or PHYS 1240, or instructor permission

    Credits: 4

  
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    PHYS 5900 - Junior Seminar


    Goals: To introduce current topics in physics and related fields. To develop communications skills including writing, reading, listening, and speaking.

    Content: Reviews of current research by junior and senior physics majors, guest lecturers, and department members.

    Taught: Fall and spring, full year sequence

    Prerequisite: PHYS 1240 or co-registration

    Credits: 0.5 per term

  
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    PHYS 5910 - Senior Seminar


    Goals: To introduce current topics in physics and related fields. To develop communications skills including writing, reading, listening, and speaking.

    Content: Reviews of current research by junior and senior physics majors, guest lecturers, and department members.

    Taught: Fall and spring, full year sequence

    Prerequisite: PHYS 1240 or co-registration

    Credits: 0.5 per term

  
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    PHYS 5920 - Research Project-Based Advanced Laboratory


    Goals: To allow students to expand and build upon their current laboratory skill set and problem solving ability by planning and executing a year-long research project.

    Content: This full year course is the culmination of all the core laboratory experiences within the physics curriculum.  Students will choose a project, based on a search of research literature. These projects will require many skills, such as equipment interfacing, computer programming, basic and advanced circuit design and analysis, experience with optics, using the machine shop to build experimental apparatuses, planning, ordering, and scheduling tasks, preparing a professional report and presentation, and applying for external grants. Successful completion of this course should fulfill the Independent Critical Inquiry and Information Literacy (Q) requirement of the Hamline Plan.

    Taught: Fall and spring, full year sequence

    Prerequisite: PHYS 3540 or instructor permission

    Credits: 2 per term

  
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    PHYS 5930 - Theoretical Mechanics


    Goals: To develop an understanding of Newtonian mechanics with emphasis on conservation principles.

    Content: Particle dynamics, central force problems, the simple harmonic oscillator, kinematics and dynamics of a system of particles, wave motion, generalized coordinates, and the Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formulations of mechanics.

    Taught: Alternate years, spring term

    Prerequisite: PHYS 3600 or co-registration, or instructor permission

    Credits: 4

  
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    PHYS 5940 - Advanced Electromagnetic Field Theory


    Goals: To develop an understanding of the classical theory of electric and magnetic fields.

    Content: Vector analysis, electric and magnetic forces and fields, the equations of Laplace and Poisson, multipole expansion, dielectric and magnetic materials, Maxwell’s equations in vacuum and in matter.

    Taught: Alternate years, fall term

    Prerequisite: PHYS 3600 or co-registration, or instructor permission

    Credits: 4

  
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    PHYS 5950 - Advanced Quantum Mechanics


    Goals: To further the understanding of and expand beyond the quantum mechanical wave concepts introduced in Modern Physics from a more mathematically advanced formalism.

    Content: Schrödinger’s equation, probability and statistics, wave functions, operators, commutation relations, the square well and other potentials, the harmonic oscillator, scattering, function spaces, the uncertainty principle, the hydrogen atom, angular momentum, perturbation theory, and extensive use of advanced mathematical symbolism.

    Taught: Alternate years, fall term

    Prerequisite: PHYS 3600 or co-registration, or instructor permission

    Credits: 4

  
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    PHYS 5955 - Advanced Topics in Physics


    Goals: To explore advanced topics in physics that go beyond our other 5000-level courses and to expose students to new developments in physics.

    Content: Topics may include electromagnetic cavities including optical fibers, scattering theory (electromagnetic and quantum), analysis of modern instrumentation, nuclear physics, high energy physics, elementary particles, astrophysics, general relativity.

    Taught: Periodically, as interest and resources allow

    Prerequisite: PHYS 3600 or co-registration, or instructor permission

    Credits: 4

  
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    PHYS 5960 - Senior Experimental Lab


    Goals: To provide an opportunity to explore independent research and to develop the skills needed to complete a research program.

    Content: Each student will develop an independent research project and timeline for completion, conduct a review of pertinent literature, construct needed equipment, and write an extensive paper summarizing the theory and results of the project.

    Taught: Periodically, as interest and resources allow

    Prerequisites: PHYS 3600 or co-registration and instructor permission

    Credits: 4

  
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    PSCI 1000 - Great Questions of Modern Politics


    Goals: Introduce students to the field of Political Science and the most pressing, relevant political questions of our time. Begin developing fundamental skills important for succeeding in the major or minor.

    Content: Overview of disciplinary/interdisciplinary subfields, significant research, and major debates within the field. Department members, as guest speakers, share their interests and areas of expertise.

    Taught: Annually

    Credits: 4

  
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    PSCI 1110 - American Government and Politics


    Goals: To introduce students to analytical concepts and frameworks for the study of American national government and politics, especially as it relates to the question of who gets what, how, and why.

    Content: The constitutional framework; political values and public opinion; the role of parties, interest groups and mass media; Congress, the judiciary and the presidency; the policy process in selected substantive areas such as defense, foreign policy, economic management, and civil liberties.

    Taught: Annually

    Credits: 4

  
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    PSCI 1430 - World Politics


    Goals: To introduce students to major issues in contemporary international relations and varying approaches to studying them, including the role of the state and non-state actors and sources of conflict and cooperation in world politics.

    Content: Realism (and its variants), Liberalism (and its variants), Marxism, Social Constructivism, Postmodernism, and Feminism; the nature of war and peace, the challenges the “global south” faces, environmental politics, cultural differences and their impact on global politics, state and human security, nationalism and ethnic conflict, international organizations, and transnational crime, including terrorism.

    Taught: Annually

    Credits: 4

  
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    PSCI 1500 - Parties and Elections in the United States


    Goals: To achieve a sound understanding of the impact and role of political parties, voting, and elections upon American government and public policy.

    Content: The role of parties and elections in democratic politics, party organization and leadership, campaigns, money and the media, voters and nonvoters, party change, and political realignment.

    Taught: Alternate years

     

    Prerequisite: PSCI 1110 or instructor permission

     

    Credits: 4

  
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    PSCI 3010 - Presidential Politics


    Goals: To achieve a clear understanding of the role of the presidency in the U.S. Political system. To explore how the presidency has been affected by political, social, and economic developments.

    Content: Presidential selection process; White House decision making; the role of presidential personality and style; White House relations with Congress, the bureaucracy, political parties, and pressure groups; role of the presidency in selected policy areas such as national security and economic policy; the impact of public opinion and mass media on the presidency; the problem of presidential power–too much or too little?

    Taught: Alternate years

    Prerequisite: PSCI 1110 or instructor permission

    Credits: 4

  
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    PSCI 3020 - International Political Economy


    Goals: To explore the theory and practice of international political economy and the intersection of political science and economics. To understand the evolution of the international monetary system and international trade policy. To consider the interaction of political authority and markets in the global economy.

    Content: Neo-classical growth models; dependency theory; politics of growth and industrialization; comparative perspective of industrialization (e.g., developmental successes and failures); international regimes; financial crises and structural adjustments.

    Taught: Alternate years

    Prerequisite: PSCI 1430 is recommended

    Credits: 4

  
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    PSCI 3030 - American Foreign Policy


    Goals: To achieve a sound understanding of the pattern and process of American foreign policy in a changing world and to comprehend the analytic perspectives that enhance such understanding.

    Content: Patterns of post-1945 foreign policy during the Cold War; social, economic, and ideological sources of U.S. policy; the foreign policy-making process; challenges to American policy in a post-Cold War world; the politics of globalization and counter-terrorism.

    Taught: Alternate years

    Prerequisite: PSCI 1110 or instructor permission

    Credits: 4

  
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    PSCI 3050 - Regional and International Security


    Goals: Analyze significant issues, controversies, and debates in the field of contemporary security studies. Examine a variety of security issues across multiple regions. 

    Content: Possible topics include civil wars, cyber warfare, transnational crime, refugee crises, and nuclearization. 

    Taught: Annually

    Prerequisite: PSCI 1430 is recommended. Students should have a basic familiarity with what is happening around the world and how issues are linked to each other at the global level, especially concerning human and state security.

    Credits: 4

  
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    PSCI 3100 - American Constitutional Law


    Crosslisted: Also listed as LGST 3100

    Goals: To study the role of the courts in the development of the American Constitution. To introduce students to the “rule of law” concept in Anglo American judicial history.

    Content: Study of the United States Constitution and U.S. Supreme Court cases on separation of powers, federalism, civil liberties and civil rights.

    Taught: Annually

    Note: This course is applicable to majors and minors in Political Science and Legal Studies, regardless of whether it is taken as PSCI 3100 or LGST 3100. This course will not count as breadth of study for either major. Students may not earn credit for both PSCI 3100 and LGST 3100.

    Credits: 4

  
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    PSCI 3300 - Public Health Policy


    Goals: Introduce students to health care policy, emphasizing the creation of US health care delivery systems with special focus on recent policy changes from the 1990s to the present.

    Content: Topics include health care cost and financing, benchmarks for evaluation, factors affecting health and health care policy, the Affordable Care Act, assessing the effectiveness and implementation of health care policy, and examining alternative policy options within a comparative perspective.

    Taught: Annually

    Prerequisite: PSCI 1110, PBHL 1100, or WSTD 1010 is recommended

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    PSCI 3430 - Gender Politics


    Goals: To analyze the relative power and impact of women in contemporary politics. To examine the most formidable hurdles to, and most promising opportunities for, gender political equality.

    Content: Current research and theories about women and gender in domestic and global political contexts. Covers gender politics as it relates to political culture, changes in media, growing regional (urban-rural-suburban) divisions, political institutions and influential public policies.

    Taught: Annually

    Prerequisite: PSCI 1000 is recommended

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    PSCI 3540 - Political Research and Analysis


    Goals: To introduce fundamental concepts of politics and contemporary methods of political analysis and research.

    Content: The development of political science as a discipline, various theories and approaches in political analysis, methods of research in political science, and practical experience in empirical analysis.

    Taught: Annually

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    PSCI 3550 - International Organizations


    Crosslisted: Also listed as GLOB 3550

    Goals: To explore the foundations of international governmental and nongovernmental organizations; through case studies and policy issues, to discuss the United Nations and its affiliated groups; to examine how transitional actors have tried to deal with critical world issues such as hunger, environmental dilemmas, human rights, and the disparities of development.

    Content: This course includes a discussion of theories of integration, histories of international organizations, and analyses of approaches to policy and politics in the international arena. This course serves as a precursor for GLOB 3650 (Model United Nations), which is offered in the Spring, and helps prepare students to participate in the Model United Nations program at Hamline. It fulfills upper level requirements for Global Studies and Political Science.

    Taught: Annually, in the fall semester

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    PSCI 3570 - Ethnic and Civil Conflict


    To examine the competing theories of the causes of civil and ethnic conflicts, to analyze processes that may lead to major human suffering when these conflicts turn into horrific wars, and to discuss possible ways to alleviate short- and long-term human suffering these conflicts create.

    Content: Emphasis on theoretical works and selected case studies from the contemporary world. students are expected (1) to define, understand, and use concepts and terms relevant to the study of civil and ethnic conflict; (2) to analyze and think critically about the effects of different forces on these types of conflicts with the appreciation that societies have different cultural, economic, sociological, and historical settings; (3) to suggest ways to reduce, if not totally eliminate, the negative influence of these conflicts on individuals and collectivities, and finally (4) to have a working knowledge of challenges that these types of conflicts hold for the future of world politics. Extensive case studies will be drawn from various parts of the world.

    Taught: Annually

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    PSCI 3580 - Connections and Collisions: Middle East in Contemporary Global Politics


    Goals: To examine politics and society in the contemporary Middle East, within the context of the region’s historical, cultural, and economic environment. To understand both the major themes and issues in Middle Eastern politics and the diverse experiences of individual countries (e.g., Egypt, Israel, Syria, Saudi Arabia).

    Content: Islam, Arab, and Ottoman Empire, the colonial legacy and nationalist movements, Arab nationalism, the Arab-Israeli-Palestinian conflict, the Iranian Revolution, the impact of ethnic and religious diversity on politics, the “Arab Spring” and the like. By the end of the semester, students are expected to be able to think critically about the Middle East, to rigorously examine the ties between the past and the present in analyzing today’s problems in the region; to have a good grasp of the diversity present in the Middle East; and to have a working knowledge of opportunities and challenges that this region holds for the peace and security in the world.

    Taught: Annually

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    PSCI 3600 - Model United Nations


    Crosslisted: Also listed as GLOB 3650

    Goals: Through this course, students will develop research, critical thinking, and team-building skills; students will also gain perspectives on the role of international organizations and nongovernmental organizations in the international community. Students will gain an appreciation for diverse cultures, modes of negotiation and conflict resolution, and the professional nature of diplomacy.

    Content: This course is designed to help prepare students to serve as delegates to the National Model United Nations Conference in New York. Students will also have the opportunity to visit other international agencies and NGOs (non-governmental organizations) in New York as well as volunteer with organizations in the Twin Cities. Topics discussed in the class will include: the nature of diplomacy, how nations interact, the operations of the United Nations system, the role of NGOs, and case studies of individual countries which the team will represent at the simulation in New York. Students will engage in mock debates and discussions of UN policy initiatives. By discussing the work of the UN and NGOs, students will also gain an understanding of a variety of transnational issues such as arms control, security, HIV/AIDS, environmental protection, child labor, etc.

    Taught: Annually, in spring term

    Prerequisites: Instructor permission and acceptance to the Model UN team; PSCI 1430 is recommended

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    PSCI 3610 - Politics and Society in the Asian Pacific Region


    Goals: To explore politics, government, and society in Asian Pacific region. To understand both the major themes and issues in Asian Pacific politics and the diverse experiences of individual countries.

    Content: National legacy, state or nation building, constitution and government structure; policy processes and the relationship between government and society; the impact of external and regional forces on individual countries.

    Taught: Annually

    Prerequisite: PSCI 1430 is recommended

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    PSCI 3630 - American Political Thought


    Goals: To understand the nature and significance of the main currents of American political thought from the 17th century to the present; to explore the historically developing relationships between liberalism, capitalism, democracy, conservatism, and radicalism in the United States.

    Content: Careful study of mainstream thinkers and documents (Jefferson, Lincoln, the Constitution) as well as dissident voices (Frederick Douglass, Emma Goldman, the anti-Federalists). Emphasis on the social and economic context of political thought.

    Taught: Alternate years

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    PSCI 3640 - Contemporary Political Ideologies


    Goals: To examine various political ideologies from a comparative and historical perspective. To consider the manner in which ideas are transformed into action.

    Content: Examination of the foundation, content, and impact of recognized ideologies such as socialism, communism, anarchism, fascism, feminism, environmentalism, and liberalism.

    Taught: Annually

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    PSCI 3650 - Western Political Thought


    Goals: To comprehend the nature and significance of the tradition of Western political thought; to develop the skills to critically analyze and evaluate contributions to the field; to explore the relevance of political theory for understanding contemporary politics and clarifying one’s own political perspective.

    Content: Analysis of the tradition of political discourse from Plato and Aristotle in ancient Greece to Marx and Mill in the 19th century, including such thinkers as Machiavelli, Locke, and Rousseau. Emphasis on issues related to democratic theory, economy and property, and political change.

    Taught: Alternate years

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    PSCI 3680 - Politics and Society in Developing Areas


    Goals: To examine politics in developing countries from a comparative perspective and to study existing approaches to issues of political legitimation and stability, economic development, and the relationship between politics and economics in the non-Western world.

    Content: The colonial legacy and the emergence of states in the developing world, approaches to studying the non-Western state, processes of political development, the nature of political leadership and problems of political legitimation, theories of political change and economic development, and the role of developing countries in the world.

    Taught: Alternate years

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    PSCI 3690 - Politics of Urban and Metropolitan America


    Goals: To introduce analytical concepts and frameworks for the study of urban and metropolitan problems.

    Content: The emergence of metropolitan American and urban political systems. Special focus on ethnic and racial politics; local political engagement; community elites; urban political economies; political problems of metropolitan areas; urban reform and planning.

    Taught: Annually

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    PSCI 3700 - Public Policy and Public Administration


    Goals: To learn how to think critically and analytically about the formulation and implementation of public policy. To acquaint students with some of the more important concepts, issues, and problems in public administration.

    Content: Policy formation and analysis; causes and consequences of policy selection and design; effective leadership; challenges associated with bureaucracy, successful administration and policy implementation; understanding and formulating research on public policy and administration.

    Taught: Annually

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    PSCI 3710 - Political, Economic, and Social Development in China


    Goals: To examine two distinctive pathways of political, social, and economic development in China (Chinese mainland and Taiwan). To explore political, economic, and social structures in the region. To consider the impact of Chinese development on the region and Sino-U.S. relations.

    Content: Post World War II political history of modern China; the similarities and differences of China’s and Taiwan’s political, social, and economic developmental strategies; governmental, social, and economic institutions and patterns; the transformation of relations between state and society; relations with the United States.

    Taught: Alternate years

    Prerequisite: PSCI 1430 is recommended

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    PSCI 3720 - Political Violence: War, Revolution, and Terrorism


    Goals: To examine the theory and practice of various types of political violence and their transforming impact on state, society, and the world. To understand what factors drive people to revolt and the relationship between power and violence. To consider the impact of the state’s reaction to political violence.

    Content: The causes of political violence; patterns of violent activity; issues of political symbolism, coercion, and legitimacy; state and people’s strategies for dealing with political violence (e.g., revolution and counterrevolution; terrorism and counterterrorism); analyses of global terrorism in the 21st century.

    Taught: Alternate years

    Prerequisite: PSCI 1430 is recommended

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    PSCI 3730 - Democracy, Authoritarianism, and Democratization


    Goals: To explore the theory and practice of democracy, authoritarianism, and democratization in various regions and states of the world.

    Content: Definitions of democracy; types of authoritarian states and power structures; theory or models of regime change; process of democratic transformation (e.g., liberalization, transition, and consolidation); patterns of regime change (top down or bottom up), “economics first” or “politics first” or dual transition theories.

    Taught: Alternate years

    Prerequisite: PSCI 1430 is recommended

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    PSCI 3740 - Political Psychology


    Goals: To explore the intersection of political science and social psychology and analyze how citizens think and feel about politics. To examine thought processes of political leaders, probing to discover why leaders make decisions that they do. To learn about research areas associated with political psychology and ways scholars go about testing their theories about political behavior.

    Content: Personality and politics, right and left wing authoritarianism, altruism, stereotyping and prejudice, political culture, social capital and community involvement, influence of mass media, groupthink, interplay of public opinion and elite decision making, methodologies associated with political psychology (experimentation, opinion polls, in-depth interviews, and focus groups).

    Taught: Alternate years

    Prerequisite: PSCI 1000 is recommended

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    PSCI 5000 - Senior Seminar


    Goals: To enable majors to synthesize prior learning in Political Science through a senior capstone experience. To provide opportunities for intensive research and discussion of select topics in contemporary U.S. and global politics.

    Content: Topics will rotate annually. Each year the seminar will focus on a specific, substantive area of politics and policy, at international, national, or local levels. Examples of topics include economic globalization, the impact of welfare reform, and advanced topics in democratic theory and social justice. Students will be expected to engage in and present the results of a major research project that integrates the central learning goals of the discipline with the substantive focus of the seminar.

    Taught: Annually

    Prerequisites: PSCI 3540 and instructor permission

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    PSCI 5100 - Senior Practicum


    Goals: To enable senior majors to explore connections between theory and practice in Political Science by combining academic analysis and learning with field experience.

    Content: Seniors taking this course will be expected to obtain a semester internship in the Twin Cities (120 hours of work) with either a governmental agency, non-profit, international NGO, political organization, or business. The course will be the “academic” portion of the internship. Each week students will be reading current articles in political science and discussing them in light of their internships. Students will engage in applied research on a topic related to their internship and be responsible for completing a substantial research paper by the end of the semester. The writing process will include creating a research proposal, outline, and drafts of the project. Other assignments will include a weekly internship journal and oral presentation of the research project at the end of the semester. Upon successful completion, the * in the course title will include the actual Internship title on the official transcript of the student.

    Taught: Annually, in spring term

    Prerequisites: PSCI 3540 and instructor permission

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    PSY 1330 - General Psychology


    Goals: To introduce the content and methods of the science of psychology. To provide a foundation for the further study of psychology.

    Content: Physiological processes, perception, learning and memory, cognition, emotion, development and personality, social processes, psychopathology and psychotherapy.

    Taught: Every semester

    Note: This course is open to first years, sophomores, and juniors. Seniors may register only with instructor permission.

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    PSY 1420 - Brain and Behavior


    Goals: To provide introductory coverage of the principles of behavioral neuroscience.

    Content: The study of the biological basis of thoughts, emotions, and behavior is explored with particular emphasis on methodologies and approaches. Examination of the general scientific method with a focus on debunking the myths of neuroscience is a recurring theme in this course.

    Taught: Every semester

    Prerequisite: PSY 1330 or equivalent (grade of C- or better) 

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    PSY 1440 - Lifespan Development


    Goals: To explore developmental theories and methods used to describe and examine typical physical, cognitive, and socio-emotional development across the lifespan. 

    Content: Research methods, physical development (brain, motor, puberty, menopause, health and wellness), cognitive development (language, intelligence, school performance, memory processes), and socio-emotional development (sense of self, personality, well-being, relationships, threats to well-being). 

    Taught: Every semester

    Prerequisite: PSY 1330 or equivalent (grade of C- or better)

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    PSY 1480 - Abnormal Psychology


    Goals: To introduce students to current perspectives on major forms of psychopathology; classification, assessment and diagnosis; and etiology, course, and treatment of disorders.

    Content: Various forms of psychopathology (e.g., anxiety disorders, mood disorders, schizophrenia, personality disorders) understood within a bio-psycho-social framework; etiology, course, and treatment of disorders; issues in classification, assessment, and diagnosis; contemporary issues in mental health and mental illness.

    Taught: Every semester

    Prerequisite: PSY 1330 or equivalent (grade of C- or better)

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    PSY 3200 - Judgement and Decision Making


    Crosslisted: Also listed as ECON 3200

    Goals: Students in this course will be able to articulate the history of Judgement and Decision Making (JDM) research, explain key JDM theories, and apply JDM theories to specific areas of human behavior using appropriate methodology from economics or psychology.

    Content: We make judgments and decisions on a daily basis: some are trivial, others consequential; some are made as individuals, others as part of a larger household or organization. How do humans arrive at judgments and decisions in varied contexts? This course provides an overview of the topics in judgment and decision making (JDM) under conditions of risk, uncertainty, interdependence, or bounded rationality. We will apply JDM theories to varied contexts (e.g., medical decision making, consumer behavior, discrimination, and gambling), explore the history of this field of study, and contrast methodological approaches used to study JDM in psychology and economics.

    Prerequisite: ECON 1100 or ECON 1310 or PSY 1330 (grade of C- or better)

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    PSY 3350 - Research Methods in Psychology


    Goals: To understand the logic of experimental methodology, basic principles of experimental design, data analyses, limitations of experiments, and ethical considerations related to psychology research.

    Content: Correlational and experimental research methods, threats to good experimental design, and interpretation of results. Students design research studies, conduct statistical analyses, and write up their own experiments.

    Taught: Every semester

    Prerequisites: PSY 1330 and a course in statistics (MATH 1200, QMBE 1310, or an equivalent) with grades of C- or better. Students who are not declared psychology or neuroscience majors must have instructor permission to register.

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    PSY 3420 - Cognitive Neuroscience


    Goals: To introduce the important insights and theoretical principles of modern cognitive science.

    Content: Students study evolution of human cognition, consciousness, perception and attention, memory, knowledge representation, language, reasoning, problem solving, cognitive development, learning, and individual differences in cognition.

    Taught: Annually

    Prerequisites: PSY 1330 and PSY 1420 (grades of C- or better)

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    PSY 3440 - Advanced Child Development


    Goals: To provide a broad overview of theories of child development and research in child psychology.  

    Content: Research methods with children, genetics, learning and cognitive development, moral development, socialization processes, family dynamics, and child-rearing.

    Taught: Annually

    Prerequisite: PSY 1330 or equivalent (grade of C- or better); PSY 1440 is recommended

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    PSY 3450 - Adult Development and Aging


    Goals: To explore developmental change across various domains of adulthood, including biological, cognitive, psychological, and socio-emotional, and how these domains interact with one another.

    Content: Perspectives on adult development and aging, methods and issues in studying adult development and aging, the neuroscience and biological theories of aging, longevity, health and functioning, developmental changes in cognition, stereotypes and beliefs about aging, personality development in adulthood, mental health and the adult life course, relationships and occupational choice across adulthood, dying and bereavement, and healthy aging.

    Taught: Fall

    Prerequisite: PSY 1330 or equivalent (grade of C- or better); PSY 1440 is recommended

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    PSY 3510 - Psychology of Emotion


    Goals: To examine contemporary psychological theories of emotion; to explore connections among the domains of emotion, cognition, and behavior; to understand the role of emotion in everyday life. 

    Content: Emotion in evolutionary and cultural context; genetic and physiological factors; emotion and cognition; emotions in personality and social relationships; individual differences in emotions; and emotions in psychopathology.

    Taught: Annually

    Prerequisite: PSY 1330 or equivalent (grade of C- or better)

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    PSY 3620 - Risk and Resilience


    Goals: To introduce students to current theories, research, and applications of psychological science related to risk and resilience.

    Content: Descriptions of models and frameworks of risk and resilience; individual perspectives; protective systems; the role of families and schools; the impact of culture; and prevention and policy approaches.

    Prerequisite: PSY 1480 with a grade of C- or better

    Note: This course is open to Online Degree Completion students only.

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    PSY 3640 - Theories of Psychotherapy


    Goals: To provide an overview of the major approaches to psychotherapy; to compare and contrast models of psychotherapy; to become familiar with contemporary trends in psychotherapy.

    Content: Major theories of psychotherapy are presented, including psychoanalysis and psychodynamic models, humanistic models, behavioral models, cognitive models, multicultural approaches, Eastern-influenced approaches, and eclectic and integrative models.

    Taught: Annually

    Prerequisite: PSY 1480 with a grade of C- or better

    Note: This course is open to Online Degree Completion students only.

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    PSY 3730 - Individual Differences


    Goals: To introduce the study of individual differences in human behavior associated with genetic variables; to explore the degree to which genetic and environmental factors mutually influence the expression of a variety of psychological phenomena; to provide an overview of behavioral genetic methods and design.

    Content: Examination of genetic and environmental influences on human behavior; pathways between genes and behavior; cognitive abilities and disabilities; psychopathology; personality; substance use; health and well-being; aging.

    Taught: Annually

    Prerequisites: PSY 1330 and one course in statistics (MATH 1200, QMBE 1310, or an equivalent) with grades of C- or better

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    PSY 3740 - Disorders of Childhood


    Goals: To introduce students to current understandings of psychological disorders of infancy, childhood, and adolescence; key issues in child classification and diagnosis; contemporary issues in developmental psychopathology.

    Content: Descriptions of psychological disorders from infancy through adolescence; genetic, physiological, psychological, family and sociocultural factors that influence the development, course and treatment of disorders, with an emphasis on understanding of child psychopathology in the context of typical development; contemporary issues in developmental psychopathology.

    Taught: Periodically

    Prerequisites: PSY 1330 (or equivalent) and one of the following: PSY 1440, PSY 1480 or PSY 3440 (grades of C- or better in all courses)

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    PSY 3800 - Social Psychology


    Goals: To introduce the prominent social psychological theories and research relating to social behavior.

    Content: A survey of classic and contemporary theories in impression formation, person perception, prejudice and stereotyping, interpersonal attraction and relationships, altruism and aggression, conformity and persuasion, and group processes.

    Taught: Annually

    Prerequisite: PSY 1330 or equivalent with a grade of C- or better

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    PSY 3820 - Cross-Cultural Psychology


    Goals: To examine research and theory on cross-cultural psychology from international and domestic perspectives. To gain an overview of how cross-cultural issues relate to and influence different areas of psychology and to present the methods psychologists use to study culture and its effects on behavior and emotion (from social psychology to clinical psychology).

    Content: Topics include (but are not limited to) cultural universality and specificity, ethnic identity, cultural variations in human development, personality, emotion, cognition, social interactions and psychopathology, psychology of immigration and acculturation, mindfulness-based approaches, and psychological assessment and treatment of culturally diverse populations.

    Taught: Annually

    Prerequisites: PSY 1330 and a statistics course (MATH 1200, QMBE 1310, or an equivalent) with grades of C- or better

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    PSY 3840 - Addictive Disorders


    Goals: To examine research and theory on the causes and consequences of alcoholism, binge drinking, drug addictions, and behavioral addictions.

    Content:  A wide variety of perspectives on normal-range substance use, college drinking, alcoholism, nicotine dependence, drug addictions, and behavioral addictions will be covered including: behavioral genetics, neuroscience and psychophysiological research, developmental issues, environmental factors, co-occurring disorders, clinical psychological treatment and prevention, psychiatry, and epidemiological, social, emotional, attitudinal, and experimental studies.  Students will engage in data analysis, write-up and interpretation of real data sets on addiction, and read and critique research articles on various topics. 

    Taught: Annually

    Prerequisites: PSY 1330, PSY 1480, and a statistics course (MATH 1200, QMBE 1310, or an equivalent) with grades of C- or better

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    PSY 3850 - Psychopathy and Antisocial Personality Disorder


    Goals: To describe and critically analyze research, theory, and practice in the field of psychopathic and antisocial personalities and forensic psychology. Students will learn key descriptive, causal and treatment approaches to the field.

    Content: We will discuss psychopathic and antisocial personalities and distinctions between these and other psychiatric disorders. Using case histories, we will examine different expressions of the psychopathic personality, including criminal and successful types, as well as the serial murderer. Other topics will include: diagnostic approaches, developmental issues, treatment, forensic psychology practice, gender differences, personality profiling; causal factors in criminal and psychopathic behavior; research on emotion, and thought processes in psychopaths.

    Taught: Annually in summer

    Prerequisites: PSY 1330 (or equivalent) and PSY 1480 (grades of C- or better), or instructor permission

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    PSY 3870 - Topics in Social and Cultural Psychology


    Goals: To introduce contemporary theories and research in social and cross-cultural psychology and explore multiple perspectives on current challenges in social and cross-cultural psychology.

    Content: This course explores the intersection of culture and social psychology. Relevant theories, research, methods, and issues will be examined. Topics include culture and self (e.g., identity, language, development, morality), culture and others (e.g., person perception, family, friendships, relationships, work), and culture and well being (e.g., health and happiness). Relationships, and Work.

    Prerequisite: PSY 1330 with a grade of C- or better

    Note: This course is open to Online Degree Completion students only.

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    PSY 5010 - Departmental Honors Project


    Goals: To complete an individual honors project in psychology. 

    Content: Honors projects are typically empirical studies, but may also involve advanced literature reviews. 

    Prerequisites: PSY 3350 and admission by application and approval of departmental sponsor and psychology faculty. 

    Credits: 6 (3 credits in fall and 3 credits in spring)

 

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