2021-2022 Undergraduate Bulletin 
    
    Dec 07, 2022  
2021-2022 Undergraduate Bulletin [Archived Bulletin]

Courses


 
  
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    ACCT 1310 - Accounting Principles I


    Goals: To introduce students to the recording process used to develop the income statement and balance sheet as well as to accounting information systems and internal controls used by corporations for the detection of fraud.

    Content: The foundations of financial and managerial accounting are designed to be taken as two sequential courses. In this first course, students will gain an in-depth exposure to inventory, receivables, plant assets and current, as well as long-term liabilities. As an alternative entity form to corporations, the course also examines accounting for partnerships. It is highly recommended that students take Accounting Principles II upon completion of this course.

    Credits: 4

  
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    ACCT 1320 - Accounting Principles II


    Goals: To further students’ financial reporting knowledge with shareholders’ equity, investments and the Statement of Cash Flows.

    Content: This is the second course in the Accounting Principles series and builds on knowledge gained in the first course. To reinforce the topics of financial accounting, students are given the opportunity to use their knowledge to perform financial statement analysis.  The course continues with managerial accounting which gives students the opportunity to learn the various methods used to cost out goods and services:  job order, process costing, variable costing and standard costing.  A focus on cost behavior, budgeting and internal decision making will give the student the opportunity to develop practical skills applicable to all business majors.

    Prerequisite: ACCT 1310 (grade of C- or better)

    Credits: 4

  
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    ACCT 3010 - Intermediate Accounting I


    Goals: Exposes students to the financial reporting system providing information for global resource allocation decisions embodied in U.S. Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) and International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS).

    Content: This course is first in a two part sequence, and focuses on the asset side of the balance sheet. Topics include the review of the basic financial statements, time value of money, receivables, property, plant and equipment, and intangibles.

    Prerequisite: ACCT 1310 (grade of C- or better)

    Credits: 4

  
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    ACCT 3020 - Intermediate Accounting II


    Goals: Building on the knowledge students gained in ACCT 3010, this second course in a two art sequence focuses on the liability and shareholders’ equity side of the balance sheet.

    Content: Topics include current liabilities, bonds, leases, deferred taxes, pensions and investments, as well as an in-depth look at the statement of cash flows.

    Prerequisites: ACCT 1320 and ACCT 3010 (grades of C- or better)

    Credits: 4

  
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    ACCT 3030 - Cost Accounting


    Goals: An expansion of ACCT 1320, this course uses the principles and techniques used to account for and analyze costs incurred to produce goods or services.

    Content: Topics include job order, process, standard and variable costing techniques, in addition to cost-volume-profit relationships and budgeting techniques to forecast costs. Emphasis is placed on decision making using the various costing techniques.

    Prerequisite: ACCT 1320 (grade of C- or better)

    Credits: 4

  
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    ACCT 3040 - Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) Regulations and Reporting


    Goals: Upon completion of this course, a student should be able to:

    • Explain the origin and structure of the SEC and its role in standard setting
    • Describe the SEC’s Integrated Disclosure System, including Regulation S-X and S-K
    • Discuss the Securities Act of 1933 and the Securities Exchange Act of 1934
    • Discuss the process of taking a company public, including preparation and filing of a registration statement
    • Describe the basic filings under the 1934 Act and requirements of shareholder communications


    Content: The course presents a history of the federal securities laws in the U.S., including the the Securities Act of 1933, the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, the origin of Regulations S-X and S-K, and the development of MD&A. It allows students to place corporate governance, financial reporting, Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) rules and regulations and Public Company Accounting Oversight (PCAOB) standards into a coherent context and framework.

    Prerequisite: ACCT 3010 with a grade of C- or better

    Credits: 4

  
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    ACCT 5020 - Federal Taxation


    Goals: The theory and practical application of federal income tax for individuals, partnerships and corporations under the laws enacted in the Internal Revenue Code.

    Prerequisite: ACCT 1320 or LGST 1110 (grades of C- or better)

    Credits: 4

  
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    ACCT 5030 - Advanced Accounting


    Goals: Advanced topics in accounting which include mergers and acquisitions, consolidated statements for a parent and subsidiary, foreign exchange, partnerships and bankruptcy.

    Content: Students will also gain exposure to non-profit and governmental accounting.

    Prerequisite: ACCT 3020 (grade of C- or better)

    Credits: 4

  
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    ACCT 5040 - Auditing


    Goals: A study of the methods used to improve the quality of information for decision makers. Reliability of financial statements is essential for markets to function efficiently.

    Content: This course covers the processes and controls used to manage and operate businesses, assertions and agreements made to third parties, and regulatory compliance.

    Prerequisite: ACCT 3020 (grade of C- or better)

    Credits: 4

  
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    ACCT 5050 - Accounting Information Systems


    Goals: To provide students with a working knowledge of how technology impacts and enhances the field of accounting. The focus will be on Sarbanes-Oxley which represents best practices for public and private accounting. 

    Content: Students will apply the methods auditors use to access risk in a computerized accounting system. 

    Prerequisite: ACCT 3020 (grade C- or better) or consent of the instructor.  

    Credits: 4

  
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    ANTH 1160 - Introduction to Anthropology


    Goals: To introduce the approaches and perspectives of the anthropological study of human beings. To survey the ways human cultures shape and are shaped by historical, environmental, biological and social forces. To introduce the importance of context in social research.

    Content: Introduces key concepts, basic content, approaches and key questions of sociocultural anthropology, archaeology, biological anthropology and linguistic anthropology. Provide students with a working knowledge of categories of key anthropological vocabulary, research orientations and practices. Consistent with the anthropology department’s commitment to high impact, experiential learning, this class includes regular field exercises requiring students to apply class content outside of the classroom.

    Taught: Annually, both semesters

    Credits: 4

  
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    ANTH 1200 - Introduction to Field Methods in Archaeology


    Goals: To introduce the methods and theory of field archaeology as part of an on-site excavation project.

    Content: Varies depending on type of site being excavated. Basic techniques covered include survey, mapping, record keeping, excavation and field conservation.

    Taught: Annually, summer term

    Credits: 4

  
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    ANTH 1500 - Planetary Home Care Manual


    Crosslisted: Also listed as ESTD 1500

    Goals: This course considers the conditions that make it possible for people – and societies, and our more-than-human neighbors – to live together on Earth in the longer term. Surveying the conditions of global crises such as climate change and environmental injustices, as well as exploring how those crises make us feel and treat each other, our readings, discussions, and in-class collaborative projects help us understand what it will take to care for the Earth as home as we move together into the future.

    Content: We explore socio-cultural, economic, and political relationships from the perspectives of Anthropology and Environmental Studies to better understand how we have arrived, globally, at profound disparities in wealth, health, life expectancy, population density, and access to opportunity and hope. In contrast, we explore global grocery chains and land commons projects to understand how people are rebuilding these systems, and to practice creating and sharing instructions for “planetary home care.” Drawing broadly on contemporary literature from geography, economics, political science, rural sociology, anthropology, and Afro- and Indigenous futurisms, this course helps prepare students to grapple with some of the more challenging issues of our post-colonial world, with its global division of labor, cultures of consumption-as-self-soothing, differential poverty and privilege, intellectual property battles, increasing systemic instabilities in the face of climate crisis and pandemics, and social responses to global connectivity. Course comes with Planetary playlist.

    Credits: 4

  
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    ANTH 1530 - Human Evolution (with Lab)


    Goals: To understand the process of biological evolution and the evolution of the human species.

    Content: Study of evolutionary theory, population genetics, comparative primate anatomy and behavior, evolution of social behavior, fossil evidence for primate and hominid evolution, origins of bipedalism, tools.

    Taught: Annually

    Note: Students must concurrently register for a lecture and a corresponding 0-credit lab section of this course.

    Credits: 4

  
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    ANTH 3030 - Topics in Sociocultural Anthropology


    Goals: To study specialized topics in the subdiscipline of sociocultural anthropology. While intended primarily for anthropology majors or those interested in majoring in anthropology, these topics courses welcome interested students from other disciplines

    Content: Focus varies. While the specific topic of the course varies from year to year, ANTH 3030 focuses on studying humans as social and cultural beings. The approaches that sociocultural anthropologists take to the study of human beings are many, varied and occasionally contentious. With this in mind, this course will take up a specific topic and examine it using various approaches—emphasizing the ways that humans make, remake and represent meanings and behaviors in social and cultural contexts. The class will discuss anthropological approaches to research and the ethnographies that sociocultural anthropologists typically produce.

    Taught: Annually, Fall semester

    Prerequisite: One 1000-level ANTH course or instructor permission (ANTH 1160 is recommended)

    Credits: 4

  
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    ANTH 3040 - Topics in Archaeology


    Goals: To study topics in the subdiscipline of archaeology. Intended primarily for anthropology majors or those interested in majoring in anthropology.

    Content: Focus varies. While the topic covered in this course may vary from year to year, all versions of ANTH 3040 will provide students with an understanding of archaeological method and theory including how archaeologists study landscapes, settlement patterns, and material remains to understand human history and human culture. Instructors will use a case-study approach (i.e. pre-contact North American archaeology, historical North American archaeology, or archaeology of the modern world) to help students understand the nature of human variation and diversity as culturally, biologically, linguistically, historically, and geographically situated. As part of this course students will develop writing and research skills such as writing a literature review, an annotated fiction, and a heritage preservation proposal. Recent example: North American Archaeology.

    Taught: Annually, Fall semester

    Prerequisite: One 1000-level ANTH course or instructor permission (ANTH 1160 is recommended)

    Credits: 4

  
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    ANTH 3050 - Topics in Linguistic Anthropology


    Goals: To study topics in the subdiscipline of linguistic anthropology. Intended primarily for anthropology majors or those interested in majoring in anthropology and/or minoring in linguistics.

    Content: Focus varies. While the topic of this course may vary from year to year, all variations of ANTH 3050 will introduce students to the anthropological study of human language in its sociocultural context. We will explore the social and cultural dimensions of language in general and (a) language(s) in particular. Key concepts include language as system, language as performance, semiotic mediation, social context, indexicality, and language ideology. Some readings are theoretical, others ethnographic, drawn from a variety of speech communities and communities of practice around the world. Writing assignments range from sociolinguistic field observations and autobiographies to book reviews and analytical essays. Recent example: Language, Culture, and Society.

    Taught: Annually, Spring semester

    Prerequisite: One 1000-level ANTH course or instructor permission (ANTH 1160 is recommended)

    Credits: 4

  
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    ANTH 3060 - Topics in Biological Anthropology


    Goals: To study topics in the subdiscipline of biological anthropology. Intended primarily for anthropology majors or those interested in majoring in anthropology.

    Content: Focus varies. While the topic of this course may vary from year to year, all variations of ANTH 3060 will explore the complexity of the relationship between biology and culture and the impact of culture change on human biology. Biological anthropologists believe that human biology must be understood in the context of the associated culture. With this in mind, a variety of different methods and theories will be introduced during the class to provide a framework from which to interpret and explain human behavior practiced by human societies in the past and present. As part of this course, students will develop oral communication skills commonly engaged in by biological anthropologists including presentational speaking at an academic conference (a mock conference with 3 – 4 presenters, a moderator, and question/answer session), group discussion of published literature, and proposal presentation to affiliated interested parties, i.e. descendant community members and governmental agencies. Recent example: Bioarchaeology.

    Prerequisite: One 1000-level ANTH course or instructor permission (ANTH 1160 is recommended)

    Credits: 4

  
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    ANTH 3100 - Principles of Archaeology


    Goals: To understand principles of archaeology–the varying ways archaeologists recover, analyze, and interpret information about the past. To gain proficiency in general scientific practices, reading archaeological literature, and grant writing. To consider ethical and practical issues in the management of cultural resources, such as why preserve heritage sites, and how to balance the sometimes conflicting views, voices, and histories found in our contemporary world.

    Content: Archaeologists are “time detectives” sifting through the material traces of past lives in order to better understand human behavior and human history. Using films, slides, artifacts, and readings, this course focuses on current methods and theories used in American archaeology. Students apply their knowledge by writing a research design as a final project.

    Taught: Alternate years

    Prerequisite: ANTH 1160

    Credits: 4

  
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    ANTH 3120 - Experimental Archaeology


    Goals: To teach students advanced archaeological theory and laboratory methods. Students, working in teams, will design and implement research projects in ethnoarchaeology and/or experimental archaeology.

    Content: One of the principal challenges faced by archaeologists wanting to learn about past human cultures is how to study the behavior of humans whom we cannot directly observe, but only understand through the physical clues they left behind. Ethnoarchaeology and experimental archaeology are two powerful tools that help archaeologists meet this challenge. Ethnoarchaeology, observing contemporary human behavior, and experimental archaeology, research that replicates under controlled conditions, behavior of interest, provide insight into the relationships between specific human actions and the archaeological evidence of these actions. The content of this course will include readings extracted from classic examples of experimental and ethnoarchaeological research. We will also engage in advanced laboratory analyses in order to identify specific research questions that students wish to address through their own experimental or ethnoarchaeological research project. Students who have taken an archaeological field methods or laboratory methods course are strongly encouraged to register.

    Taught: Alternate years

    Prerequisite: ANTH 1160 or instructor permission

    Credits: 4

  
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    ANTH 3130 - Excavating Hamline History


    Goals: To have students participate as part of an interdisciplinary team excavating a historic site on or near campus. This archaeological excavation is part of research focused on the early history of “Hamline Village.” It is also a public archaeology project with the goal of involving people from throughout the local community including Hancock Elementary students, neighborhood residents, and University alumni.

    Content: Students learn basic archaeological field and laboratory methods, principles of historic archaeology, and anthropological approaches to material culture studies through readings and lectures, but primarily through participation. This course emphasizes archaeology as a holistic discipline linking the humanities, fine arts, social sciences, and natural sciences. Students help provide this interdisciplinary perspective by contributing to the overall research, educational, and public archaeology goals through individual and collaborative projects.

    Please note that this is a lab course. Lab meetings are built into the course schedule and students do not need to register for a separate lab section.

    Taught: Alternate years

    Prerequisite: Instructor permission

    Credits: 4

  
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    ANTH 3210 - Advanced Field Methods in Archaeology


    Goals: To gain additional competence in, and advanced theoretical understanding of, the field methods in archaeology.

    Content: Students learn how to map using an alidade or transit and are trained in field photography, flotation techniques, soil sampling and planning excavation strategy.

    Taught: Annually, summer term

    Prerequisite: ANTH 1200

    Credits: 4

  
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    ANTH 3220 - Laboratory Techniques in Archaeology (with Lab)


    Goals: To introduce laboratory methods in archaeology.

    Content: Basic laboratory techniques including accessioning procedures, artifact analysis, preservation techniques and a basic introduction to cartography, photography and faunal/floral analysis.

    Taught: Alternate years

    Prerequisite: ANTH 1160

    Note: Students must concurrently register for a lecture and a corresponding 0-credit lab section of this course.

    Credits: 4

  
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    ANTH 3300 - Ethnographic Research Methods


    Goals: This course surveys the variety of ethnographic research methods and techniques used by anthropologists. It builds on the foundation of the fieldwork exercises introduced in introduction to anthropology through a much more detailed examination of the work anthropologists do and the nature of the data they collect.

    Content: This course will cover both the practical aspects of actual ethnographic research—the methods and skills of anthropological fieldwork—and review theoretical examinations and critiques of the work anthropologists do. We will discuss formulating research questions, writing a research proposal and collecting data in sociocultural contexts (through, for example, written fieldnotes, interviews, observations, translation, visual techniques and archival research.) We will also read some outstanding ethnographies.

    Taught: Alternate years, fall semester

    Prerequisite: ANTH 1160 or instructor permission

    Credits: 4

  
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    ANTH 3370 - Minnesota Archaeology


    Goal: To study the 10,000-year history of the peoples and cultures of what is now Minnesota, with special emphasis on American Indian history from glacial times through the European invasion and the treaty period of the 1800s.

    Content: Examination of changing perceptions of American Indian history. Material culture is examined in relationship to environment and life ways. The role of the world view and spirituality in harmonizing lifestyle with the environment.

    Taught: Alternate years

    Prerequisite: ANTH 1160

    Credits: 4

  
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    ANTH 3440 - Human Osteology and Skeletal Identification (with Lab)


    Goals: To develop a basic knowledge of human osteology, including human bone identification and human functional anatomy. To understand the methods and techniques for skeletal identification and for the reconstruction of life histories from bone that may be applied in both recent forensic and ancient archaeological contexts.

    Content: Human osteology, functional anatomy, bone biology, techniques for determination of age-at-death, sex, stature and for identifying skeletal indicators of biological affinity, trauma, disease and general health. A case study approach leads to the production of a forensic or osteobiographical report on a set of skeletal remains.

    Taught: Annually

    Prerequisite: ANTH 1160 or instructor permission

    Note: Students must concurrently register for a lecture and a corresponding 0-credit lab section of this course.

    Credits: 4

  
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    ANTH 3500 - Forensic Anthropology


    Goals: This course will introduce students to the scope of knowledge, theories, and skills forensic anthropologists bring to forensic death investigations. Students will develop and practice problem solving and critical thinking through close observation, evidence analysis, and presentation of results through written reports and oral testimony.

    Content: Location and recovery of remains, death scene investigation, dental analysis, time-since-death estimates, interpretation of trauma and pathology, and applications to international human rights violations. In addition, students will critically evaluate the scientific foundation of analytical techniques applied by forensic anthropologists. Results of investigations performed during class will be presented in both oral and written form.

    Taught: Alternate years

    Prerequisite: ANTH 1160 or CJFS 3400, or instructor permission

    Credits: 4

  
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    ANTH 3580 - Cultural Psychology


    Goals: To investigate the ways in which culture and psyche make each other up, and to gain experience conducting interviews.

    Content: Beginning with the premise that all psychologies are “ethno-psychologies” and systems of health care are best understood when approached through the matrix of culture, this course will explore a wide range of issues broadly construed under the category of cultural psychology and mental health. Lectures and readings focus on the “borderland” between anthropology, psychiatry/psychology, and medicine. Students conduct person-centered ethnographic interviews in order to analyze the ways individuals tend to think of themselves in relation to their cultural worlds.

    Taught: Alternate years

    Prerequisite: ANTH 1160 or PSY 1330

    Credits: 4

  
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    ANTH 3610 - Visual Anthropology


    Goals: This course examines the ways culture and society are represented and imagined visually. While we will primarily focus on photography and film, we will also look more broadly at the visual aspects of culture as it intersects with material culture, media and the digital. A central concern will be to examine the ways that these technologies construct knowledge and understanding of ourselves and others.

    Content: The course emphasizes equal parts of theory and practice. Film screenings and theoretical works will provide a foundation for members of the class to make their own films. The last half of the semester will engage students individually and in groups with creating documentary research projects using visual research methods.

    Taught: Once per year

    Prerequisite: ANTH 1160 or SOC 3000 or instructor permission

    Credits: 4

  
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    ANTH 5260 - Anthropological Thought and Theory


    Goals: To become familiar with the kinds of explanations and methods anthropologists have used and/or are currently using to analyze cultural phenomena. To develop critical thinking.

    Content: Theoretical statements and exemplary analyses covering a spectrum of approaches employed by 19th and 20th century anthropologists.

    Taught: Annually

    Prerequisites: At least two 3000-level anthropology courses

    Credits: 4

  
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    ANTH 5270 - Senior Seminar


    Goals: The goal of the course is to provide anthropology majors, in the final semester of their senior year, the opportunity to bring together the variety of content and knowledge from various anthropology courses they have taken to broadly address theoretical or conceptual issues of contemporary relevance in anthropology.

    Content: Taught in a seminar format, it is intended as a capstone class in the major that emphasizes active student discussion, critique and the production of high quality written work. This course is intended to reaffirm the learning objectives of the anthropology program, and to be a gateway to using anthropological knowledge beyond the university in the world of work, or professional training in the discipline.

    Taught: One senior seminar is offered in rotation by an anthropology department faculty member during the spring semester of each year

    Prerequisites: ANTH 1160 and at least one 3000-level anthropology course, or instructor permission

    Credits: 4

  
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    ART 1130 - Drawing


    Goals: To gain an understanding of the basic elements and principles of drawing. To foster an awareness of the cultural and aesthetic significance of the basic concepts that form the foundation of the visual arts.

    Content: Elements of line, value, shape, perspective, texture, and principles of design and composition.

    Credits: 4

  
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    ART 1140 - Drawing from Life


    Goals: To learn and apply the basic elements and principles of drawing to drawing the human figure and elements from life.

    Content: Study of line, contour, shape, value, foreshortening, composition, design, and principles of light and shade while drawing from the live model and elements from life.

    Credits: 4

  
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    ART 1150 - Art Foundations


    Goals: To learn and apply the basic elements and principles of 2D and 3D design. 

    Content: Study of form, line, balance, color, and composition through analog making in two and three dimensions with paper and found objects. 

    Taught: Annually in fall and spring

    Credits: 4

  
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    ART 1510 - Beginning Sculpture


    Casting, Carving, Construction, and Steel Fabrication. This course introduces students to the fundamentals of sculpture, concept development, and safe, productive working habits. Students will learn basic mold making and metal casting techniques, fundamental wood construction, carving, and essential steel fabrication. As a class, we will work together to promote concept development in conjunction with voracious production of work. Students will start to develop their own visual language and explore their conceptual interests moving towards a larger, nuanced body of work.

    Goals: To learn technical sculptural skills that allow you to confidently execute.   To thoroughly develop the basic stages of creating: ideate->sketch->test->construct->reflect. To synthesize craft and concept. To advance individual visual vernacular using sculptural methods and technique.

    Content: The fundamental elements of sculpture, concepts of form and space, aesthetic theory, mold-making and casting, development of the individual aesthetic. Emphasis on skill building.

    Credits: 4

  
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    ART 1540 - Beginning Painting


    Goals: To learn how to manipulate and control the aesthetic elements of line, color, texture, shape, tension, etc. on a two-dimensional surface.  To understand that painting is a process and discipline linked to art historical discourse.

    Content: Oil paints will be the central medium of this class.  The course is structured and importance is placed on the formal elements of design: color, surface, composition, and space.  The emphasis is on learning to see objectively, be it from still-life set ups, landscape, or no objective studies.  The artistic and art historical concerns and choices are stressed.  Critiques are an important part of the class. 

    Taught: Annually, fall semester.

    Prerequisite: ART 1130, 1140, or 1150, or instructor permission

    Credits: 4

  
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    ART 1800 - Beginning Printmaking


    Goals: To learn the fundamental techniques and processes of intaglio and relief printmaking.

    Content: Demonstration of use of engraving and carving tools, etching techniques, introduction
    to various inks, papers, printing methods.

    Beginning Printmaking introduces time-honored techniques of intaglio and relief. Students will
    engage in a collaborative environment, participating group critiques and discussions. Assignments will be given to direct learning of printmaking processes in a creative manner.

    Credits: 4

  
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    ART 1900 - Digital Photography I


    Crosslisted: Also listed as DMA 1410

    Goals: To develop fundamental abilities in photography including mastering technical vocabulary, understanding of the photographic process, managing digital files, basic photo editing and adjustment, printing techniques.

    Content: Technical vocabulary and required skills, parts of the camera, understanding camera controls and options, framing a shot, shooting successfully in different conditions. Participants will also gain knowledge of the history of the development of photography and practice in analyzing and critiquing photographic images.

    Taught: Annually, fall and spring

    Credits: 4

  
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    ART 3510 - Intermediate Sculpture


    Casting, Carving, Construction, and Steel Fabrication. This course introduces students to the fundamentals of sculpture, concept development, and safe, productive working habits. Students will learn advanced mold making and metal casting techniques, fundamental wood construction, carving, and essential steel fabrication. As a class, we will work together to promote concept development in conjunction with voracious production of work. Students will start to develop their own visual language and explore their conceptual interests moving towards a larger, nuanced body of work.

    Goals: To learn technical sculptural skills that allow you to confidently execute. To thoroughly develop the basic stages of creating: ideate->sketch->test->construct->reflect. To synthesize craft and concept. To advance individual visual vernacular using sculptural methods and technique.

    Content: The elements of sculpture and technical processes as required by individual projects.

    Taught: Annually

    Prerequisite: ART 1510

    Credits: 4

  
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    ART 3540 - Intermediate Painting


    Goals: To build upon knowledge and experience gained in ART 1540 Beginning Painting. The aesthetic elements of line, color, texture, shape, tension, etc. on a two-dimensional surface are developed. To continue to understand that painting is a process and discipline linked to art historical discourse. 

    Content: Oil paints will be the central medium of the class. The course is structured and importance is placed on the formal elements of design: color, surface, composition, and space. The emphasis is on learning to see objectively, be it from still-life set ups, landscape, or no objective studies. The artistic and art historical concerns and choices are stressed.  Critiques are an important part of the class. 

    Taught: Annually, spring term

    Prerequisite: ART 1540 or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 4

  
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    ART 3800 - Intermediate Printmaking


    Goals: Further develop skills and formation of concepts. Gain confidence in independent projects beyond beginning level.

    Content: Demonstration of use of engraving and carving tools, etching techniques, introduction to various inks, papers, printing methods.

    Intermediate Printmaking advances students into self-directed assignments and encourages students to implement intaglio and relief printmaking skills already achieved at the beginning level while adding new techniques such as mezzotint, engraving and multiple-plate or block color printing. Students will also be encouraged to develop concepts and discuss in class critiques.

    Prerequisite: ART 1800

    Credits: 4

  
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    ART 3900 - Digital Photography II


    Crosslisted: Also listed as DMA 3410

    Goals: To build on the skills developed in ART 1900: Digital Photography I through more advanced camera operations, enhanced editing work (including Photoshop), understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of different file formats, advance printing and image manipulation work.

    Content: Camera control in manual operations under different conditions, managing technically complex shots, effectively using lenses and filters. Image adjustment in Photoshop. History of recent developments in digital photography. Tutorials in analyzing and critiquing photographic work.

    Taught: Alternate years

    Prerequisite: ART 1900 or approval of instructor based on portfolio review

    Credits: 4

  
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    ART 5710 - Advanced Sculpture


    Casting, Carving, Construction, and Steel Fabrication. This course introduces students to the fundamentals of sculpture, concept development, and safe, productive working habits. Students will learn basic mold making and metal casting techniques, fundamental wood construction, carving, and essential steel fabrication. As a class, we will work together to promote concept development in conjunction with voracious production of work. Students will start to develop their own visual language and explore their conceptual interests moving towards a larger, nuanced body of work.

    Goals: To advance individual visual vernacular using sculptural methods and technique.

    Content: Advanced conceptual production and independent projects.

    Taught: Annually

    Prerequisite: ART 3510

    Credits: 4

  
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    ART 5740 - Advanced Painting


    Goals: To build upon knowledge and experience gained in ART 3540 Intermediate Painting. To develop the aesthetic elements of line, color, texture, shape, tension, etc. on a two-dimensional surface. To continue to understand that painting is a process and discipline linked to art historical discourse. 

    Content: Oil paints will be the central medium of the class. The course is structured and importance is placed on the formal elements of design: color, surface, composition, and space. The emphasis is on learning to see objectively, be it from still-life set ups, landscape, or no objective studies. The artistic and art historical concerns and choices are stressed. Critiques are an important part of the class. 

    Taught: Annually, spring term

    Prerequisite: ART 3540 or permission of instructor

    Credits: 4

  
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    ART 5900 - Advanced Printmaking


    Goals: To achieve a greater mastery of printmaking and develop an independent body of work.

    Content: Further exploration of printmaking techniques and processes.

    Advanced Printmaking emphasizes a mastery of printmaking techniques which may include intaglio and/or relief (woodcut). Students are encouraged to incorporate cross-curricular interests in their studio class practice, such as other art-related media or disciplinary studies. Students must create a cohesive body of prints that demonstrate a high level of technical skill, conceptual complexity and creative thought. Students are expected to exhibit a professional, mature attitude, are able to commit time to work during and outside of class and have empathy toward fellow students.

    Prerequisites: ART 1800 and 3800

    Credits: 4

  
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    ART 5950 - Senior Seminar


    Goals: To explore contemporary issues in art, with special focus on art theory and the professional presentation of images. To address archival preservation, exhibition installation, and health and safety issues related to the use of materials in the visual arts. To provide studio seniors with a capstone experience, which would combine art theory and exhibition practicum. The instructor will be the advisor for their senior exhibition.

    Content: Readings in theory and criticism, exhibitions in local museums and galleries, and lectures by visiting scholars and artists.

    Taught: Annually

    Prerequisite: Studio arts major in senior year.

    Credits: 4

  
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    ARTH 1000 - Art Appreciation


    Goals: This course considers art from a broad point of view with an introduction to art as a visual language and to various methods of making art in addition to fostering guided appreciation of art’s development over time.

    Content: This course, taught online,  includes material on tools and methods of making art and material on appreciation of the arts in the western world from antiquity to the present day. This course does not count towards major or minor requirements in Studio Arts or Art History. 

    Credits: 4

  
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    ARTH 1100 - World Art


    This class, taught entirely online, considers the development of art from a global perspective. This course does not count towards major or minor requirements in Studio Arts or Art History. This course is graded on a Pass/No Pass basis.

    Credits: 4

  
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    ARTH 1200 - Western Traditions: Prehistory to the Middle Ages


    Goals: To explore the arts from prehistoric times through the Middle Ages, and to promote an understanding that a work of art is a reflection of the culture in which it was created. To gain an understanding of formal principles and the materials and techniques of artistic production.

    Content: The traditions of painting, sculpture, architecture, and the decorative arts in the western world from roughly 20,000 BC to the fourteenth century. Major monuments are considered in light of religious, political, social, economic, and geographic conditions. Special emphasis is placed on the iconography and cultural context of the works, along with the methods and materials of artistic production. This course is strongly advised as a foundation for ARTH 1210.

    Taught: Annually, fall term.

    Credits: 4

  
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    ARTH 1210 - Western Traditions: Renaissance to Contemporary


    Goals: To introduce the major monuments of art history from the fourteenth century through the 1980s, and to promote an understanding that a work of art is a reflection of the culture in which it was created. To gain an understanding of formal principles and the materials and techniques of artistic production.

    Content: The traditions of painting, sculpture, and architecture in the western world from the fourteenth century through contemporary times. Major monuments are considered in light of religious, political, social, economic, and geographic conditions. Special emphasis is placed on the iconography and cultural context of the works, along with the methods and materials of artistic production.

    Taught: Annually, spring term.

    Prerequisite: While it is not required, students are strongly advised to take ARTH 1200 before taking ARTH 1210.

    Credits: 4

  
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    ARTH 1600 - American Art, 1800-1945


    Goals: Art and other visual images have reflected and helped shape the way Americans think about their country and each other. This in-depth survey course examines a critical period (roughly 1800-1945) in American art and history during which the frontier closed, fortunes were made, the national identity shifted, and the Puritan suspicion of art gave way.

    Content: With a focus on the development of American art forms and the American modern artist, we will consider the relationship between visual images and power in a time of growing power and diversity for both the nation and art. Primary source readings will augment the text and visuals, and case studies will highlight important issues in American art and society at the time, and in recent scholarship.

    Taught: Alternate years.

    Credits: 4

  
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    ARTH 3900 - 19th-Century Art in Europe


    Goals: To explore major artists and artistic developments in Western Europe in the 19th century within their cultural, political, social, and esthetic contexts.

    Content: The emphasis of the course will be on painting, but significant developments in sculpture and architecture will be considered as well. This course is strongly advised as a foundation for ARTH 3910.

    Prerequisites: ARTH 1200 and ARTH 1210

    Credits: 4

  
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    ARTH 3910 - 20th-Century Art in Europe and the United States


    Goals: To explore the arts of the 20th century in Europe and the United States, and to examine individual artists and artworks in light of their respective artistic movements and cultural contexts. To analyze relationships between theory and image, as well as relationships between artistic periods.

    Content: Sculpture and painting of the 20th century in Europe and the United States. Special attention is given to major artistic movements, theoretical explorations, and the role of the avant-garde.

    Prerequisites: ARTH 1200 and ARTH 1210. Students are strongly advised to take ARTH 3900 prior to taking ARTH 3910.

    Credits: 4

  
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    ARTH 5000 - Senior Art History Research


    Goals: To conduct independent research appropriate for the discipline of art history. To develop a senior research paper necessary for graduation.

    Content: Independent research concluding with a major paper on a topic appropriate for the discipline of art history. Each student shall work closely with the instructor in topic selection, research methodology, development, and evaluation of the paper.

    Taught: Annually, fall term; taught concurrently with ARTH 5450.

    Prerequisites: ARTH 1200 and ARTH 1210. 

    Credits: 2

  
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    ARTH 5010 - Senior Art History Research Honors


    Goals: To conduct independent research appropriate for the discipline of art history. To develop a senior research paper necessary for graduation.

    Content: Independent research concluding with a major paper on a topic appropriate for the discipline of art history. Each student shall work closely with the instructor in topic selection, research methodology, development, and evaluation of the paper. The Senior Art History Honors tutorial is considered a year-long project.

    Prerequisites: ARTH 1200 and ARTH 1210, or permission of instructor. In addition, the student must be a senior with a grade point average of 3.5 or higher in the Art History major and of 3.0 in cumulative coursework to qualify for graduation with Honors. The student must have written permission of the instructor to register for Senior Art History Research Honors.

    Note: Typically, students register for this course in the fall term and complete it in the spring term of their senior year. Upon successful completion, the course title will include the actual honors project title on the official transcript of the student.

    Credits: 4

  
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    ARTH 5450 - Senior Seminar: Methodologies of Art History


    Goals: This course acquaints students with various methodological approaches used within the field of art history. Through analyzing and applying these various methods, students practice critical reading and discussion skills, and exercise writing, research, and speaking skills necessary to execute an advanced research project in the field of art history.

    Content: Students will study various methodological approaches used in the field of art history and apply them to their own research project through completion of a written project as well as an oral presentation.

    Taught: Annually, fall semester; taught concurrently with ARTH 5000.

    Prerequisites: ARTH 1200 and ARTH 1210.

    Credits: 2

  
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    BIOC 3820 - Biochemistry I (with Lab)


    Goals: Living organisms can be described as open thermodynamic systems in which exergonic and endergonic events are coupled in the process of growth and reproduction. We will examine aspects of cellular metabolism with particular attention to the integration and regulation of cellular systems. Modern biochemical techniques will be introduced in laboratory exercises.

    Content: Molecular basis of cellular function, protein structure/function relationships, enzyme function and kinetics, reaction mechanisms, energetics and catabolism, biosynthesis of cellular macromolecules.

    Taught: Fall term

    Prerequisites: BIOL 1510 and CHEM 3460, or instructor permission

    Note: Students must concurrently register for a lecture and a corresponding 0-credit lab section of this course.

    Credits: 4

  
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    BIOC 3830 - Biochemistry II (with Lab)


    Goals: To continue the process of understanding the molecular design of living systems begun in Biochemistry I. Special emphasis is placed on instrumental methods of structure elucidation and the use of contemporary computational methods. The understanding of important anabolic and catabolic pathways of biologically important non-protein molecules, and the integration of these pathways within the metabolic cycle is the focus of study.

    Content: The general integration of metabolism including carbohydrate, glycogen, amino acid, and fatty acid metabolism. The biosynthesis of lipids, steroids, amino acids, and nucleic acids. The process of photosynthesis.

    Taught: Every other year, spring term

    Prerequisites: BIOC 3820 (grade of C- or better)

    Note: Students must concurrently register for a lecture and a corresponding 0-credit lab section of this course.

    Credits: 4

  
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    BIOL 1120 - Biology of Human Function (with Lab)


    Goals: To introduce non-science majors to human structure and function. To develop an appreciation of advances in biological technologies.

    Content: The function of cells and organ systems, emphasizing the physical mechanisms used to maintain a state of dynamic equilibrium.

    Prerequisites: None

    Note: Students must concurrently register for a lecture and a corresponding 0-credit lab section of this course.

    Credits: 4

  
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    BIOL 1130 - Biodiversity and Conservation Biology (with Lab)


    Goals: To understand the ecological, evolutionary, geological, and historical factors which have led to the current distribution and abundance of organisms; to examine the changes in these distributions due to human activities; and to evaluate conservation strategies for different types of organisms.

    Content: Fundamentals of population ecology, community ecology and evolution; classification of organisms; patterns of biodiversity in space and time; extinctions and their causes; conservation genetics; design of nature preserves.

    Prerequisites: None

    Note: Students must concurrently register for a lecture and a corresponding 0-credit lab section of this course.

    Credits: 4

  
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    BIOL 1140 - Human Heredity and Disease


    Goals: To introduce students to the principles of heredity, genetic technology, examples of hereditary diseases, and related societal concerns. To confront students with ethical choices that society will need to make regarding new genetic technologies.

    Content: Modes of inheritance, gene and chromosomal behavior, hereditary disease, DNA structure, mutation, gene regulation, cancer, genetic engineering, gene therapy.

    Prerequisites: None

    Credits: 4

  
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    BIOL 1150 - Biology of Women (with Lab)


    Goals: To introduce students to the basic aspects of reproductive biology, biological bases of gender differences, and women’s health. The course will also provide a context for examining the social and political framework within which science is done, and the extent to which scientific studies may be conducted as objective or value-neutral activities.

    Content: Course topics will include reproductive anatomy and physiology, sexual development and differentiation, hormones and reproductive cycle regulation, pregnancy and childbearing, reproductive technologies, STDs and AIDS, women and aging, and women and cancer. Students will practice methods of scientific inquiry and analysis, and assess the strengths and limitations of scientific approaches toward understanding the biology of women.

    Prerequisites: None

    Note: Students must concurrently register for a lecture and a corresponding 0-credit lab section of this course.

    Credits: 4

  
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    BIOL 1180 - Biotechnology in Your Life (with Lab)


    Goals: Engage non-science majors in thinking about biotechnology, its controversies and promises. To develop skills in critical thinking and analysis by testing claims of superior qualities of various biotechnology products. 

    Content: This course examines major products of biotechnology and their effects on our life today. We will talk about ethical and scientific aspects of genetically modified food, human cloning, recombinant drugs and much more… We will look into news, talk about your groceries, and think about new approaches to regulate new technologies. We will also try to understand how all that biotech works!

    Taught: Summer

    Prerequisites: None

    Note: When this course is taught online, the lab is also online. When the course is taught in person, students must register for the corresponding 0-credit lab section.

    Credits: 4

  
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    BIOL 1181 - Biotechnology in Your Life


    Goals: Engage non-science majors in thinking about biotechnology, its controversies and promises. To develop skills in critical thinking and analysis by testing claims of superior qualities of various biotechnology products.

    Content: This course examines major products of biotechnology and their effects on our life today. We will talk about ethical and scientific aspects of genetically modified food, human cloning, recombinant drugs and much more… We will look into news, talk about your groceries, and think about new approaches to regulate new technologies. We will also try to understand how all that biotech works!

    Credits: 4

  
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    BIOL 1190 - Human Impacts on Aquatic Ecology


    Goals: To learn fundamental concepts of the ecology of aquatic ecosystems; to understand how human activities affect the functioning of aquatic ecosystems and the goods and services that these ecosystems provide; and to learn about the process of science and to practice science.

    Content: In this course, designed for non-majors, students will learn fundamental concepts of the ecology of aquatic ecosystems (e.g., lakes, rivers, oceans) and how different types of human disturbances (e.g., draining of wetlands for agriculture, damming of rivers for hydroelectric power generation, introduction of non-native species) and sources of pollution (e.g., nutrient pollution, acid rain) impact these ecosystems. 

    The understanding of this content will be gained through interactive lectures, class discussion of readings from a variety of sources, investigation of lake and stream data using data visualization tools, and ‘wet lab’ experiments.

    Activities that students will do that relate to learning the process of science include 1) evaluating a scientific claim using scholarly literature, and 2) learning about the peer review process by which scientific literature is published by reading and discussing reviews of a manuscript that was submitted for publication in a peer-reviewed journal. 

    In addition, students will practice ‘hands-on’ science through a multi-week team project in which they will investigate the impact of a particular type of pollution on aquatic organisms. For this project, the research teams will 1) investigate the scientific literature to identify specific topics and to develop a research hypothesis, 2) design an experiment to test their hypothesis, 3) collect and analyze data from the experiment, and 4) interpret the results, and convey the  findings to the class in a research presentation.

    Credits: 4

  
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    BIOL 1191 - Human Impacts on Aquatic Ecology (with Lab)


    Goals: To learn fundamental concepts of the ecology of aquatic ecosystems; to understand how human activities affect the functioning of aquatic ecosystems and the goods and services that these ecosystems provide; and to learn about the process of science and to practice science.

    Content: In this course, designed for non-majors, students will learn fundamental concepts of the ecology of aquatic ecosystems (e.g., lakes, rivers, oceans) and how different types of human disturbances (e.g., draining of wetlands for agriculture, damming of rivers for hydroelectric power generation, introduction of non-native species) and sources of pollution (e.g., nutrient pollution, acid rain) impact these ecosystems. 

    The understanding of this content will be gained through interactive lectures, class discussion of readings from a variety of sources, investigation of lake and stream data using data visualization tools, lab experiments, and field labs.

    Activities that students will do that relate to learning the process of science include 1) evaluating a scientific claim using scholarly literature, 2) learning about the peer review process by which scientific literature is published by reading and discussing reviews of a manuscript that was submitted for publication in a peer-reviewed journal. 

    In addition, students will practice ‘hands-on’ science in the weekly 2-hour laboratory component of the course. Lab activities will include field trips to sample streams, and on-campus labs that will include a multi-week team project in which they will investigate the impact of a particular type of pollution on aquatic organisms. For this project, the research teams will 1) investigate the scientific literature to identify specific topics and to develop a research hypothesis, 2) design an experiment to test their hypothesis, 3) collect and analyze data from the experiment, and 4) interpret the results, and convey the  findings to the class in a research presentation.

    Note: Students must concurrently register for a lecture and a corresponding 0-credit lab section of this course.

    Credits: 4

  
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    BIOL 1510 - Integrated Concepts in Biology I (with Lab)


    Goals: This course is the first course in a sequence of two. It provides an introduction to biology’s core concepts from molecules through cells including information, evolution, cells, emergent properties, and homeostasis. This flipped course emphasizes collaborative learning and problem solving. The weekly laboratory focuses on core competencies of the process of science, the interdisciplinary nature of modern biology, data interpretation, quantitative skills, communication in multiple formats, and experience with large databases.

    Content: Introduction to biology’s core concepts from molecules through cells including information, evolution, cells, emergent properties, and homeostasis. Many course examples emphasize human biology. This course is using a new approach to teaching introductory biology that is based on the first principles of learning: students learn best when they construct their own knowledge, when their learning builds upon previous knowledge, and when knowledge is relevant to students’ lives.

    Taught: Fall term

    Prerequisites: None

    This course is open to first year students only. Exceptions are made by permission of the instructor. Second and third year students planning to pursue majors that require this course should contact the instructor.

    Note: Students must concurrently register for a lecture and a corresponding 0-credit lab section of this course.

    Credits: 4

  
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    BIOL 1520 - Integrated Concepts in Biology II (with Lab)


    Goals: This course is an introduction to biological concepts and principles at and above the level of the organism. It is the 2nd half of a year-long introduction to biology. The weekly laboratory emphasizes core competencies of the process of science, the interdisciplinary nature of modern biology, data interpretation, quantitative skills, communication in multiple formats, and experience with large databases.

    This course is using a new approach to teaching introductory biology that is based on the first principles of learning: students learn best when they construct their own knowledge, when their learning builds upon previous knowledge, and when knowledge is relevant to students’ lives.

    Content: Broad topic areas in this course include evolution, information transmission, the cell as the fundamental unit of life, homeostasis, and emergent properties, and they will be explored from the organismal to ecological system levels.

    Taught: Spring term

    Prerequisites: None

    This course is open to first year students only. Exceptions are made by permission of the instructor. Second and third year students planning to pursue majors that require this course should contact the instructor.

    Note: Students must concurrently register for a lecture and a corresponding 0-credit lab section of this course.

    Credits: 4

  
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    BIOL 3030 - Ecology (with Lab)


    Goals: To demonstrate empirical and theoretical understanding of the relationships between organisms and their biological and physical environment; to examine the distribution and abundance of organisms; to apply quantitative analysis to field-collected ecological data.

    Content: Energy flow, ecosystem organization, community structure, organismal interactions, population dynamics, physiological ecology, and biome structure.

    Taught: Alternate years, fall term

    Prerequisites: BIOL 1510 and BIOL 1520, grades of C- or better

    Note: Students must concurrently register for a lecture and a corresponding 0-credit lab section of this course.

    Credits: 4

  
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    BIOL 3040 - Principles of Physiology (with Lab)


    Goals: To introduce the basic principles of cellular and organismal physiology emphasizing structure-function relationships, mechanisms of integration of cellular, tissue and organ functions, and the concept of homeostatic balance. To gain experience in the practice of science by posing scientific questions, designing experiments or observations to answer these questions, and presenting the results of these studies in a public forum. To continue developing oral and written communication skills and quantitative reasoning skills.

    Content: Physiological mechanisms for the regulation of water balance, gas exchange, and energy balance in both plants and animals will be covered. The role of cells, tissues, and organs in physiological process; function and regulation of the endocrine, digestive, respiratory, vascular, and nervous systems in animals.

    Taught: Fall term

    Prerequisites: BIOL 1510 and 1520 (grades of C- or better)

    Note: Students must concurrently register for a lecture and a corresponding 0-credit lab section of this course.

    Credits: 4

  
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    BIOL 3050 - Principles of Genetics (with Lab)


    Goals: To acquire an understanding of the basic principles of transmission genetics, molecular genetics, and population genetics. Students will be able to explain these principles and discuss projects and problems in which these principles are relevant. To gain experience in the practice of science by posing scientific questions, designing experiments or observations to answer these questions, and presenting the results of these studies in a public forum. To increase skills in the following areas: oral and written communication, use of the computer as a scientific tool, functioning as a member of a goal-directed team.

    Content: Mendelian genetics, genetic mapping, cytogenetics and chromosome abnormalities, genetic engineering methods and applications, genomics, gene regulation and developmental genetics, the genetics of cancer, population genetics, and microevolution.

    Taught: Fall term

    Prerequisites: BIOL 1510, BIOL 1520, and CHEM 1130 or CHEM 1500 (or concurrent registration in CHEM); grades of C- or better

    Note: Students must concurrently register for a lecture and a corresponding 0-credit lab section of this course.

    Credits: 4

  
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    BIOL 3060 - Principles of Cell Biology (with Lab)


    Goals: To introduce students to the structure and function of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, and to the dynamic nature of cellular function. To introduce investigative skills such as information searching, research design and analysis, and scientific writing.

    Content: The chemical basis of cellular function; macromolecules; organelles; membranes and membrane transport; enzymes and the catalysts of cellular reactions; information storage and information flow within and between cells; cell division and its regulation; cellular metabolism including cellular respiration.

    Taught: Spring term

    Prerequisites: BIOL 1510, BIOL 1520, and CHEM 1140 or CHEM 1500 (or concurrent registration in CHEM 1140); grades of C- or better

    Note: Students must concurrently register for a lecture and a corresponding 0-credit lab section of this course.

    Credits: 4

  
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    BIOL 3100 - Neurobiology (with Lab)


    Goals: To comprehend and appropriately use the language and terms of neurobiology; to describe the function of the nervous system at the molecular, cellular, and systems levels; to interpret and discuss experimental findings in neuroscience.

    Content: An analysis of the biology of neurons and the nervous system. Topics include the molecular basis of electrical excitability in neurons, synaptic transmission and plasticity, motor control, mechanisms of sensation, and construction and modification of neural circuits.

    Taught: Spring term

    Prerequisites: BIOL 1510 and 1520 (grades of C- or better)

    Note: Students must concurrently register for a lecture and a corresponding 0-credit lab section of this course.

    Credits: 4

  
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    BIOL 3400 - Comparative Vertebrate Evolution and Anatomy (with Lab)


    Goals: To investigate the form and function of anatomical features of a variety of animals, using the comparative method to assess the relative importance of evolutionary history and differing environments on morphology. Dissection with be emphasized.

    Content: The evolution and integration of morphology, with emphasis on the roles of homology, ontogeny, and adaptation to diverse environments as influences on form and function.

    Taught: Alternate years, fall term

    Prerequisites: BIOL 1510 and 1520 (grades of C- or better)

    Note: Students must concurrently register for a lecture and a corresponding 0-credit lab section of this course.

    Credits: 4

  
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    BIOL 3650 - Invertebrate Biology (with Lab)


    Goals: To examine the form, function, reproduction, ecology, and phylogeny of invertebrate animals. To recognize characteristics unique to particular taxa, and homologies that reveal relatedness among taxa.

    Content: Principles of phylogenetic analyses; characteristics of major invertebrate taxa; investigation of the ecological relevance of invertebrates through reading and discussion of primary literature. Laboratories will include behavioral and physiological experiments, field trips to study invertebrates in their natural habitats, and surveys of invertebrate phyla.

    Taught: Alternate years, fall term

    Prerequisites: BIOL 1510 and 1520 (grades of C- or better)

    Note: Students must concurrently register for a lecture and a corresponding 0-credit lab section of this course.

    Credits: 4

  
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    BIOL 3770 - Population Genetics and Evolution (with Lab)


    Goals: To understand the basis of microevolution through population genetics; to demonstrate the uses of molecular genetic data in evolutionary biology; to explore the mechanisms of evolutionary change; and to show how these mechanisms have led to the evolutionary history seen in the fossil record.

    Content: The nature of biological variation, genetic structure of populations, Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, quantitative genetics, principles of evolutionary phylogenetics, evolutionary processes, and the evolutionary history of major taxa.

    Prerequisites: BIOL 1510 and 1520 (grades of C- or better)

    Note: Students must concurrently register for a lecture and a corresponding 0-credit lab section of this course.

    Credits: 4

  
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    BIOL 5540 - Aquatic Biology (with Lab)


    Goals: To understand the differences and similarities among the various freshwater aquatic ecosystems (lakes, streams, wetlands), and to understand the ecological principles and interactions that govern the distribution and abundance of aquatic organisms. To develop computer skills and writing skills.

    Content: Lake origins; glacial history of Minnesota; water chemistry; aquatic ecosystem structure; food web interactions; survey of important aquatic organisms; linkages among terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems; human impacts on aquatic environments (e.g., eutrophication, acidification). Laboratories will include field studies of aquatic environments, case studies, and controlled laboratory experiments.

    Taught: Alternate years, fall term

    Prerequisites: BIOL 1510, 1520, and any one 3000-level biology elective (grades of C- or better)

    Note: Students must concurrently register for a lecture and a corresponding 0-credit lab section of this course.

    Credits: 4

  
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    BIOL 5550 - Microbiology (with Lab)


    Goals: Introduction to the biology of microorganisms and the aseptic techniques used to grow and maintain microbial cultures. Practice molecular biology procedures and apply them to the study of microbial function and metabolism. Read and discuss current research in microbiology and related fields.

    Content: Microorganisms: their structure, classification and physiological characteristics. Study of the basic principles of bacterial biochemistry and metabolism, genetics and pathogenicity. Introduction to common methods used to control microbial growth, including antibiotics and their mode of action. Overview of viruses, fungi and their role in common diseases. Study the relevance of microorganisms in industrial and environmental processes.

    Taught: Alternate years, spring term

    Prerequisite: BIOL 3050 or BIOL 3060 (grade of C- or better), or instructor permission

    Note: Students must concurrently register for a lecture and a corresponding 0-credit lab section of this course.

    Credits: 4

  
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    BIOL 5600 - Developmental Biology (with Lab)


    Goals: To survey developmental processes in a variety of protists, plants and animals. To design and perform experiments that address topics chosen by students, using developmental systems. To practice writing skills.

    Content: The genetic basis of development, sexual reproduction, morphogenesis, and embryonic development in animals, plant development, pattern formation, regeneration, metamorphosis, and aspects of cancer and aging.

    Taught: Alternate years

    Prerequisite: BIOL 3050 or BIOL 3060 (grade of C- or better), or instructor permission

    Note: Students must concurrently register for a lecture and a corresponding 0-credit lab section of this course.

    Credits: 4

  
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    BIOL 5650 - Animal Behavior (with Lab)


    Goals: To investigate how and why animals have developed their particular solutions to problems of life such as finding food, shelter, and mates, avoiding predators and disease, and producing offspring; to develop skills in observation, experimental design and analysis; to enhance oral and written communication skills; and to develop an appreciation for the alien nature of animal experiences.

    Content: Evolutionary theory, behavioral genetics, and behavioral ecology will be used to develop methods for exploring the immediate causes, development, adaptive value, and evolutionary history of behavioral traits. We will discuss and critique various ethological models and current controversies in the field. Laboratory sessions will stress appropriate experimental design and statistical analysis. Students will gain further skills in experimental design and analysis while conducting independent research in the field or in the laboratory on a topic of their choice.

    Taught: Alternate years

    Prerequisites: BIOL 1510, 1520, and any one 3000-level biology elective (grades of C- or better)

    Note: Students must concurrently register for a lecture and a corresponding 0-credit lab section of this course.

    Credits: 4

  
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    BIOL 5700 - Research in Biology


    Goals: Introduction to research methodologies and the ways that graduate school research groups operate. The intent is to foster close student/faculty interaction as these parties join together in a research venture.

    Content: Introduction to research methods including survey of relevant literature, experimental design, conducting a series of experiments, and analysis and presentation of data. Students enrolled in the course will work independently and with the instructor, and also attend biweekly laboratory group meetings. Students will learn research techniques and conduct investigations in a focused area of biology to be decided by the instructor.

    Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor

    Credits: 4

  
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    BIOL 5900 - Molecular Cell Biology (with lab)


    Goals: To gain an understanding of cellular structure and function at the molecular level. To become familiar with cytological and molecular approaches as applied to contemporary issues in cell biology. To read and discuss contemporary research in molecular cell biology.

    Content: Cell compartmentalization, cell structure and function, organelle function and biogenesis, cell motility, cell communication and membrane transport, signal transduction and regulation of cell growth, chromosome structure, cell cycle regulation, molecular mechanisms of aging and cancer. Laboratory will emphasize recombinant DNA and molecular techniques.

    Prerequisite: BIOL 3050 or BIOL 3060 or BIOC 3820, grade of C- or better

    Credits: 4

  
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    BIOL 5960 - Senior Capstone


    Goals: To examine recent scientific literature in the field.

    Content: Seminar structure includes class discussions of primary literature and individual investigation of an aspect of the course topic theme. Topics for this course change each time it is taught, however, students may only count this course one time as a Biology Major course.

    Taught: Fall and Spring terms

    Prerequisite: BIOL 5962 (grade of C- or better)

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    BIOL 5961 - Biology Seminar I


    Goals: The seminar program aims at introducing students to cutting edge research in the fields of biology and exercise science.

    Content: The seminar program includes presentations by outside speakers, Hamline faculty, and students. 

    Taught: Each semester

    Prerequisites: BIOL 1510 and 1520 (grades of C- or better)

    Note: Required for biology majors.

    Credits: 1

  
  •  

    BIOL 5962 - Biology Seminar II


    Goals: The seminar program aims at introducing students to cutting edge research in the fields of biology and exercise science.

    Content: The seminar program includes presentations by outside speakers, Hamline faculty, and students. 

    Taught: Each semester

    Prerequisite: BIOL 5961 (grade of C- or better)

    Note: Required for biology majors.

    Credits: 1

  
  •  

    BIOL 5963 - Biology Seminar III


    Goals: The seminar program aims at introducing students to cutting edge research in the fields of biology and exercise science.

    Content: The seminar program includes presentations by outside speakers, Hamline faculty, and students. 

    Taught: Each semester

    Prerequisite: BIOL 5962 (grade of C- or better)

    Note: Required for biology majors.

    Credits: 1

  
  •  

    BIOL 5964 - Biology Seminar Presentation


    Goals: The seminar program aims at introducing students to cutting edge research in the fields of biology and exercise science.

    Content: All Biology majors must present the results of a research project as part of the degree requirements for the major. Seniors in their last semester of the Biology Major should register for this course and present a research seminar to the department.

    Taught: Each semester; to be taken in final semester, senior year

    Prerequisite: BIOL 5963 (grade of C- or better)

    Note: Required for biology majors and biology scholars.

    Credits: 1

  
  •  

    CDS 1010 - Introduction to Programming


    Goals: To help students develop greater precision in their algorithmic thinking by writing moderate-sized programs for a variety of applications, including but not limited to biology, chemistry,  economics, literary studies, and mathematics.

    Content: Students will learn the fundamentals of computer programming (loop structures, if-else statements, Boolean expressions, and arrays) to solve  problems from different disciplines. A short introduction to object-oriented programming is also given. This course is taught using Python.

    Prerequisite: High school algebra

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    CDS 1020 - Introduction to Computational Data Science


    Goals: To continue the study of computational techniques using Python, with an emphasis on applications in data science and analysis.

    Content: This is a continuation of CDS 1010, applying algorithmic thinking to applications in data analysis. Topics include data mining, data visualization, web-scraping.

    Prerequisite: CDS 1010

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    CDS 3200 - Elements of Statistical Learning


    Goals: This is a continuation course for MATH 1200, introducing techniques of statistical learning.

    Content: Supervised learning, with a focus on regression and classification methods. This includes linear and nonlinear models as well as model and feature selection. Some unsupervised learning methods such as principal components and clustering are also discussed.

    Prerequisites: CDS 1010 and MATH 1200 or QMBE 1310

    Credits: 4

  
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    CDS 5950 - Computational Data Science Capstone


    Goals: To help students integrate the knowledge and skills attained in the Computational Data Science program.

    Content: Students will propose, execute, provide feedback on, and communicate about projects that are grounded in their disciplinary courses (the three courses they took that count toward another minor) but have a clear computational data science approach.

    Prerequisites: CDS 1020, CDS 3200, MATH 3440, QMBE 3740, and QMBE 3750

    Credits: 4

  
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    CFST 1100 - Introduction to Conflict Studies


    Goals: This multi-disciplinary course introduces students to the major approaches to understanding conflict at the interpersonal, organizational, and socio-cultural levels.

    Content: Students study how conflict is understood from a range of disciplinary perspectives and in a wide variety of settings so as to develop broad perspectives on the ways in which conflict can be analyzed.

    Taught: Annually

    Credits: 4

  
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    CFST 3100 - Approaches to Conflict Response


    Goals: To develop an understanding and appreciation for the range and implications of various forms of conflict response and intervention.

    Content: Students will study a range of response strategies to conflict, including conflict escalation and de-escalation, coercion, persuasion, cooperation and reward, and will experiment with a variety of specific intervention techniques.

    Prerequisite: CFST 1100 or permission of the instructor

    Credits: 4

  
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    CFST 3300 - The Role of Conflict in Social Change


    Goals: To introduce students to basic concepts shared between conflict studies and social justice studies; to examine connections between social conflict and people’s movements for social change; and to study particular movements through these conceptual lenses.

    Content: Students will learn to distinguish among interpersonal, organizational, and socio-cultural levels of conflict; study the role of conflict in particular movements; and develop analyses of an aspect of that movement in which they are especially interested.

    Taught: Annually

    Credits: 4

  
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    CFST 3500 - Intergroup Dialogue


    Goals: To learn about social identity, difference, and intersectionality, and how they are linked to social inequality, privilege, and power; to explore sources of conflict in social interaction within and across identity groups; and to examine how individual experience is connected to intergroup relations, institutional structures, and broader social context.

    Content: Intergroup dialogue courses emphasize awareness and knowledge of particular social identities (such as race or dis/ability) and development of group interaction skills. Content includes what distinguishes dialogue as a form of social interaction; processes through which individuals form social identities; how identities shape interdependence, conflict, power, privilege, and solidarity among and within groups; historical and contemporary perspectives on intergroup relations; and how identities and group membership inform possibilities for social change. Students will practice critical analysis skills with a focus on their own experiences and on group dynamics using key concepts in identity development and intergroup relations.

    Taught: Annually

    Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor based on interview

    Note: Offered with focus on race or dis/ability. Students may enroll in more than one intergroup dialogue course if topics differ.

    Credits: 4

  
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    CFST 3800 - Inside-Out Prison Exchange


    Crosslisted: Also listed as CJFS 3800, SOCJ 3800, and WGS 3800

    The Inside-Out prison exchange program brings incarcerated individuals and Hamline undergraduates together to take a course behind prison walls to investigate issues related to crime, justice, freedom, inequality, and other social justice issues. Both inside and outside students will read various texts and write response papers throughout the semester. Students will work together to complete a class project. The course will take place at a Minnesota Department of Corrections Institution. This course is open to all Hamline undergraduate students who meet the prerequisite requirements.

    Prerequisites: One of the following courses: CJFS 1120, CFST 1100, SOC 1110, SOCJ 1100, WSTD 1010, and at least sophomore standing. Additionally, all students must complete an essay and interview to obtain instructor approval.

    Note: The department offering the course varies by term. It may be offered under CFST, CJFS, SOCJ, and WSTD.

    Credits: 4

  
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    CHEM 1100 - Chemistry and Society (with Lab)


    Goals: To introduce and develop some basic principles of chemistry and demonstrate how they affect humankind and the environment.

    Content: Basic principles of chemistry are introduced using a case study method. Topics may include the ozone layer, global warming, acid rain, nuclear fission and fusion, nutrition, water as a natural resource, fossil and solar energy, and others. Special attention is paid to the social, economic and political contexts in which society deals with these issues. Models of chemical structure and bonding are developed as well as the basic concepts of thermodynamics, kinetics, and acid-base relationships.

    Taught: Annually

    Prerequisite: None, high school chemistry is not required. 

    You may not take CHEM 1100 if you have already completed CHEM 1130 - General Chemistry I.

    Note: Students must concurrently register for a lecture and a corresponding 0-credit lab section of this course.

    Credits: 4

  
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    CHEM 1130 - General Chemistry I (with Lab)


    Goals: To introduce and develop the fundamental principles of analytical, biological, inorganic, organic, and physical chemistry. To provide instruction in fundamental laboratory techniques and to encourage the development of interpretive and problem-solving skills.

    Content: Scientific measurement, stoichiometry, energy changes, physical behavior of gases, electronic structure of atoms, periodicity, bonding models including valence bond, molecular orbital and hybridization, molecular geometry, intermolecular forces, properties of solutions, liquids and solids, nomenclature, and chemistry of familiar elements. Gravimetric, volumetric and calorimetric measurements; graphical data analysis.

    Taught: Annually

    Prerequisite: Higher algebra; high school chemistry is highly recommended

    Note: Students must concurrently register for a lecture and a corresponding 0-credit lab section of this course.

    Credits: 4

  
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    CHEM 1140 - General Chemistry II (with Lab)


    Goals: To further develop the fundamental principles of analytical, biological, inorganic, physical and organic chemistry. Emphasis on the development of problem-solving techniques. The laboratory focuses on inorganic qualitative analysis.

    Content: Spontaneity and rates of chemical reactions; equilibrium involving gases, acids, bases and salts; acid-base theories; titration theory and practice, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, biochemistry, the chemical and physical properties of metals, nonmetals, and coordination compounds.

    Taught: Annually

    Prerequisite: CHEM 1130 (grade C- or better)

    Note: Students must concurrently register for a lecture and a corresponding 0-credit lab section of this course.

    Credits: 4

  
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    CHEM 1500 - Advanced General Chemistry (with Lab)


    Goals: This course combines topics from both CHEM 1130 and CHEM 1140 and is meant to be an accelerated one-semester version of General Chemistry.

    Content: The course includes a rigorous treatment of atomic and molecular structure, explores chemical bonding, chemical thermodynamics and kinetics, equilibrium, chemical reactions and stoichiometry, and electrochemistry.

    Taught: Fall semester

    Prerequisite: Advanced high school chemistry (AP, Honors, IB, etc), ACT math score of 28 or greater or instructor permission

    Note: Students must concurrently register for a lecture and a corresponding 0-credit lab section of this course.

    Credits: 4

 

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