2021-2022 Undergraduate Bulletin 
    
    Dec 07, 2022  
2021-2022 Undergraduate Bulletin [Archived Bulletin]

Courses


 
  
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    CHEM 3240 - Analytical Chemistry (with Lab)


    Goals: To introduce and develop the theoretical concepts and laboratory practices of quantitative chemical analysis.

    Content: Theory and practice in classical analytical methods and instrumentation; emphasis on ionic equilibria and electrochemistry and their relevance to chemical analysis; application of various software and statistics to analytical problems.

    Taught: Annually, spring

    Prerequisite: CHEM 1140 or CHEM 1500 (grade of C- or better)

    Note: Students must concurrently register for a lecture and a corresponding 0-credit lab section of this course.

    Credits: 4

  
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    CHEM 3330 - Instrumental Methods


    Goals: To develop in depth the theory, scope, and limitations of the most commonly applied instrumental techniques of chemical analysis.

    Content: Theory and techniques of infrared, ultraviolet, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, gas and liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry, potentiometry, and other spectral and electrical methods of analysis, emphasizing relations among such factors as noise, resolution, sensitivity, error, and economics; applications of computers to analytical systems.

    Taught: Annually, fall

    Prerequisites: CHEM 3240 and CHEM 3450 (grades of C- or better), and co-registration with CHEM 3940

    Note: The department recommends that students complete MATH 1180 and PHYS 1240 before taking this course.

    Credits: 4

  
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    CHEM 3450 - Organic Chemistry I (with Lab)


    Goals: To develop a broad understanding of practical and theoretical concepts of organic chemistry and introduce the basic organic reaction pathways. Thermodynamic considerations of 3-dimensional molecular shape are discussed. Instrumental techniques for the assignment of molecular structure are a focus. Modern mechanistic theory of organic chemical reactions is developed.

    Content: Introduction to nomenclature, acid/base chemistry in context of organic chemistry, stereochemistry, and an overview of reaction types including substitution, addition, elimination and rearrangement.  Some spectroscopy (IR, MS) is also covered.

    Taught: Annually, fall

    Prerequisite: CHEM 1140 or CHEM 1500 (grades of C- or better) or instructor permission

    Note: Students must concurrently register for a lecture and a corresponding 0-credit lab section of this course.

    Credits: 4

  
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    CHEM 3460 - Organic Chemistry II (with Lab)


    Goals: To further develop the theoretical concepts of organic chemistry and develop plausible synthetic and mechanistic pathways.

    Content: Additional coverage of organic reactions including mechanisms associated with elimination, electrophilic substitution, electrophilic addition, free radical reactions, and pericyclic reactions. Chemistries of alkenes, alkynes, aromatics, pericyclic compounds, polymers, proteins and carbohydrates including reactions of intermediary metabolism.  Spectroscopy (NMR) is emphasized.

    Taught: Annually, spring

    Prerequisite: CHEM 3450 (grade C- or better)

    Note: Students must concurrently register for a lecture and a corresponding 0-credit lab section of this course.

    Credits: 4

  
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    CHEM 3550 - Physical Chemistry I


    Goals: Molecular Thermodynamics - To introduce and develop fundamental concepts of thermodynamics applied to chemical problems and to introduce and/or further develop problem-solving techniques using mathematical tools.

    Content: Thermodynamics is introduced and developed around chemical systems. Topics covered include the study of the properties of gases, a statistical foundation of thermodynamics, laws of thermodynamics, free energies and equilibrium, solution properties and applications of thermodynamics to electrochemistry. Time permitting applications in kinetics and non-equilibrium systems may be explored.

    Taught: Annually, fall

    Prerequisites: CHEM 1140 or CHEM 1500, Math 1180, and PHYS 1240 or (co-registration) with grades of C- or better

    Note: The department recommends that students complete MATH 3320 before taking this course.

    Credits: 4 credits

  
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    CHEM 3560 - Physical Chemistry II


    Goals: Quantum Chemistry - To introduce concepts of quantum mechanics and demonstrate applicability to real chemical systems.

    Content: The foundations of quantum mechanics from the classical and basic concepts of the wave equation, probability, particle-in-a-box, basic rigid rotator and harmonic oscillator models for spectroscopy, and the hydrogen atom. Quantum mechanics continues with the chemically relevant topics of the multielectron atomic system, molecules and bonding, quantum mechanical calculational methods, and applications in spectroscopy (electronic, vibrational, rotational, optical, laser, and NMR).

    Taught: Every other year, spring

    Prerequisite: CHEM 3550 (grade of C- or better) and co-registration with CHEM 3950

    Credits: 4

  
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    CHEM 3700 - Chemical Biology


    Goals: Chemical biology is a scientific discipline at the interface of chemistry and biology. This course explores the application of chemical techniques to manipulate and investigate biological systems.

    Content: Current literature resources are used to understand diseases such as microbial and viral infections, heart disease, cancer, or neurodegenerative diseases. Topics may include the chemistry of amino acids, protein structure/dynamics elucidation, reactivity of biological molecules, chemical modification of proteins, peptidomimetics, native chemical ligation, and protein/ligand modeling.

    Taught: Annually, fall

    Prerequisite: CHEM 3450 (grade of C- or better)

    Credits: 4

  
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    CHEM 3840 - Inorganic Chemistry (with Lab)


    Goals: To introduce and develop classical and modern concepts of inorganic chemistry.

    Content: Periodic, chemical, and physical properties of the elements; symmetry and group theory; ionic and covalent bonding; acid-base chemistry; kinetics and mechanisms; metals and semiconductors; electronic spectra of coordination complexes; organometallic and bioinorganic chemistry; the application of molecular orbital theory; and quantum mechanical calculations.

    Taught: Annually, spring

    Prerequisite: CHEM 3240 (grade of C- or better)

    Note: Students must concurrently register for a lecture and a corresponding 0-credit lab section of this course.

    Credits: 4

  
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    CHEM 3940 - Advanced Laboratory Techniques


    Goals: To provide instruction in some practical skills commonly used by professional chemists.

    Content: Experimental design, laboratory manipulations, data analysis, searching the scientific literature, preparation and presentation of oral and written reports. Work in the fall term is coordinated with CHEM 3330 and emphasizes student-driven small group research projects along with instrument design, capabilities, and limitations.

    Taught: Annually, fall term

    Prerequisites: CHEM 3240 and CHEM 3450 (grades of C- or better), and co-registration with CHEM 3330

    Credits: 2

  
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    CHEM 3950 - Physical Chemistry Laboratory Techniques


    Goals: To provide instruction in some practical skills commonly used by chemists and engineers with an emphasis on techniques used in physical chemistry.

    Content: Experimental design, laboratory manipulations, data analysis, searching the scientific literature, preparation and presentation of written lab notebooks, reports and journal articles. Work in the spring term is coordinated with the Physical Chemistry course 3560. The course laboratories investigate thermodynamic/quantum principles and properties using calorimetry, spectroscopy, conductivity, and computational techniques.

    Taught: Every other year, spring term

    Prerequisites: CHEM 3550 (grade of C- or better) and co-registration with CHEM 3560

    Credits: 2

  
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    CHEM 5700 - Molecular Biophysics


    Goals: To help students develop a fundamental understanding of the physical principles that drive biochemical processes.

    Content:  Protein structure, molecular thermodynamics (especially as applied to molecular potential functions and protein structure calculations), basic statistical mechanics, quantum mechanics and spectroscopy (especially as applied to the study of biomolecular structure), and the kinetics of protein folding and protein motions.

    Taught: Every other year, spring term

    Prerequisites: BIOC 3820 or CHEM 3700, PHYS 1240 (or co-registration), and MATH 1180 (with grades of C- or better)

    Credits: 4

  
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    CHEM 5900 - Advanced Topics in Chemistry


    Goals: To present in-depth overviews in chemistry beyond the scope of the foundational courses (3000-level), particularly those topics that intersect multiple subdisciplines.

    Content: Content will vary by topic. Proposed example topics include NMR spectroscopy experiments and interpretation, medicinal chemistry, polymer chemistry, electrochemistry, nanochemistry, organometallic chemistry depending on the faculty expertise.

    Prerequisite: A 3000-level chemistry course (grade of C- or better)

    Credits: 2

  
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    CHEM 5950 - Chemistry Seminar A


    Goals: To introduce current topics in chemistry and biochemistry including presentations from the greater chemical community. To develop communication skills including writing, reading, listening and speaking.  All juniors and seniors majoring in chemistry must attend as part of the degree requirement.

    Content: This seminar course includes presentations by outside speakers, Hamline faculty, and junior and senior chemistry and biochemistry majors.

    Taught: Each semester

    Note: Three semesters of CHEM 5950 are required for chemistry majors.

    Credits: 0.5

  
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    CHEM 5951 - Chemistry Seminar B


    This is the final seminar requirement for students who are NOT completing an ACS certified degree.

    Goals: To introduce current topics in chemistry and biochemistry. To develop communication skills including writing, reading, listening and speaking. 

    Content: In addition to CHEM 5950 content, students will be asked to complete a formal paper on an agreed on chemistry topic, a chemistry assessment assignment, and a writing reflection on their chemistry experience. This seminar course includes presentations by outside speakers, Hamline faculty, and junior and senior chemistry and biochemistry majors.

    Note: Required for chemistry majors not completing ACS certification. CHEM 5951 is to be taken in the final semester, senior year, after completing three semesters of CHEM 5950 - Chemistry Seminar A.

    Credits: 0.5

  
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    CHEM 5960 - Capstone Seminar


    This is the final seminar requirement for students completing an ACS certified degree.

    Goals: To provide an opportunity to further develop research techniques and skills in the field of chemistry.

    Content: In addition to the CHEM 5950 content, students will complete an individual, original research project in some field of chemistry and will present it in writing and in a formal seminar. Students will also complete a chemistry assessment assignment and a written reflection on their chemistry experience.

    Taught: Each semester

    Prerequisite: Instructor and department chair permission

    Credits: 2

  
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    CHIN 1110 - Beginning Chinese I


    Goals: To quickly begin conversing in Chinese on the following topics: greetings, introductions, dates and time, making plans, hobbies, sports, making phone calls, visiting friends and food and beverages. Students will learn Pinyin, the phonetic system for Chinese, and to be able to recognize and type about 300 Chinese characters. Character writing will be introduced, but the emphasis is on vocabulary building and oral communication.

    Content: A textbook and two workbooks provide opportunities to learn vocabulary and sentences, gain understanding of Chinese grammar, and practice speaking, listening, reading, writing, translating and self-expression. Chinese history and culture will be taught through film, songs, video clips, and poetry.

    Taught: Annually, in fall term

    Note: Students who wish to take this course, but have another scheduled course that conflicts with the lab time of this course, may arrange for an alternate lab time. Please contact the instructor for assistance.

    Credits: 4

  
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    CHIN 1120 - Beginning Chinese II


    Goals: To use Chinese to discuss food and drink, birthdays, student life, academics, shopping, and transportation. Students will be able to move between past, present, and future in Chinese and will be able to describe both objects and actions using a wide range of descriptive adjectives and adverbs. In addition to being able to recognize and type approximately 350 Chinese characters, students will also focus on writing Chinese characters and completing homework by hand.

    Content: A textbook and two workbooks provide opportunities to learn vocabulary and sentences, gain understanding of Chinese grammar, and practice speaking, listening, reading, writing, translating and self-expression. Chinese history and culture will be taught through film, songs, video clips, and poetry.

    Taught: Annually, in spring term

    Language placement: The department recommends that students complete CHIN 1110 before taking this course. Otherwise, students should do the online placement assessment for Chinese and contact the course instructor for placement advice.

    Note: Students who wish to take this course, but have another scheduled course that conflicts with the lab time of this course, may arrange for an alternate lab time. Please contact the instructor for assistance.

    Credits: 4

  
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    CHIN 3110 - Intermediate Chinese I


    Goals: To develop conversational ability around the topics of the weather, Chinese cuisine, directions and location, planning a party, and seeing a doctor. Students will also read stories in simple non-technical prose, and master the vocabulary and grammar introduced in their readings. This course is designed to help students to reach intermediate level communicative skills and to establish a solid base for more advanced language learning.

    Content: A textbook and two workbooks provide opportunities to learn vocabulary and sentences, gain understanding of Chinese grammar, and practice speaking, listening, reading, writing, translating and self-expression. Chinese geography and regional cuisine will be taught through map exercises, folk songs, and film clips. Students will research a restaurant in China and present the regional dishes served there.

    Taught: Annually, in fall term

    Language placement: The department recommends that students complete CHIN 1120 before taking this course. Otherwise, students should do the online placement assessment for Chinese and contact the course instructor for placement advice.

    Note: Students who wish to take this course, but have another scheduled course that conflicts with the lab time of this course, may arrange for an alternate lab time. Please contact the instructor for assistance.

    Credits: 4

  
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    CHIN 3120 - Intermediate Chinese II


    Goals: To enable students to develop conversational ability around the topics of friendship and dating, housing and rent, fitness and leisure activities, and international travel. Students will also gain an understanding of the wider Chinese-speaking world by researching communities in Singapore, Malaysia, Vietnam and other SE Asian countries. Students will also read stories in simple non-technical prose, and master the vocabulary and grammar introduced in their readings. This course is designed to help students to reach intermediate level communicative skills and to establish a solid base for more advanced language learning.

    Content: A textbook and two workbooks provide opportunities to learn vocabulary and sentences, gain understanding of Chinese grammar, and practice speaking, listening, reading, writing, translating and self-expression. Knowledge of the diversity of the Chinese-speaking world will be explored through map exercises, articles, film clips, and online research on housing and apartment rental in Asia.

    Taught: Annually, in spring term

    Language placement: The department recommends that students complete CHIN 3110 before taking this course. Otherwise, students should do the online placement assessment for Chinese and contact the course instructor for placement advice.

    Note: Students who wish to take this course, but have another scheduled course that conflicts with the lab time of this course, may arrange for an alternate lab time. Please contact the instructor for assistance.

    Credits: 4

  
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    CHIN 3600 - Advanced Intermediate Chinese I


    Goals: To build advanced-level skills of self expression in Chinese, including giving opinions, summarizing content, offering detailed description, and making comparisons. Gaining a deeper understanding of Chinese history, festivals, famous poets and artists, and social etiquette is another key goal.

    Content: Emphasis on reading comprehension and speaking; acquisition of new characters and grammatical structures; review of characters and grammar already studied.

    Taught: Annually

    Language placement: The department recommends that students complete CHIN 3120 before taking this course. Otherwise, students should do the online placement assessment for Chinese and contact the course instructor for placement advice.

    Note: Students who wish to take this course, but have another scheduled course that conflicts with the lab time of this course, may arrange for an alternate lab time. Please contact the instructor for assistance.

    Credits: 4

  
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    CHIN 3620 - Advanced Intermediate Chinese II


    Goals: To continue building advanced-level skills of self expression, including summarizing ideas and arguments, offering detailed description, making comparisons, and giving a speech to inform. Learning more about Chinese history, social etiquette, and contemporary issues, such as environmental protection, are additional goals.

    Content: Emphasis on reading comprehension and speaking; acquisition of new characters and grammatical structures; review of characters and grammar already studied. Students will research a Chinese non-profit organization and write a professional letter of self-introduction.

    Taught: Annually

    Language placement: The department recommends that students complete CHIN 3600 before taking this course. Otherwise, students should do the online placement assessment for Chinese and contact the course instructor for placement advice.

    Note: Students who wish to take this course, but have another scheduled course that conflicts with the lab time of this course, may arrange for an alternate lab time. Please contact the instructor for assistance.

    Credits: 4

  
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    CJFS 1120 - Crime and Justice in America


    Goals: To introduce students to the basic framework of the American criminal justice system.

    Content: This course provides a broad overview of the American criminal justice system. The course examines criminal justice decision-making, police, criminal law, courts, prisons, and the juvenile justice system. This course is designed to introduce students to these broad topic areas and to explore the issues of equality and treatment, and the efficacy of criminal justice policy within the contemporary American criminal justice system.

    Taught: Fall and spring

    Credits: 4

  
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    CJFS 1150 - Drugs and the Human Body


    Goals: To introduce how drugs affect humans and society.

    Content: Drug use and abuse; effects of various drugs; drug laws, regulations, and policies.

    Credits: 4

  
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    CJFS 1400 - Diversity Issues in Criminal Justice


    Goals: To develop student’s understanding of diversity in American Society, and develop increased understanding and awareness of student’s own implicit and explicit biases regarding persons from different cultures, race, ethnicity, national origin, age, gender, economic position, sexual orientation, and persons with disability. Students will understand how these concepts relate to communication, attitudes, and behavior inside the criminal justice system to increase effectiveness in interactions between law enforcement and criminal justice professions with persons from diverse backgrounds.

    Content: The course provides an overview of diversity and its importance in criminological studies and in the criminal justice system. The course will focus on issues related to race, gender, and economic equality and also disadvantaged persons from a variety of backgrounds to understand the relationship between the criminal justice system and citizens. The course content will cover historical and present social issues that relate to diversity and disparity in the criminal justice system.

    Taught: Fall and spring

    Prerequisite: CJFS 1120

    Credits: 4

  
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    CJFS 3140 - Research Methods and Data Analysis


    Goals: To introduce the research methods and quantitative and qualitative data analysis techniques used in criminal justice research and practice. Emphasis is placed on crime data analysis.

    Content: This course covers the research process; research ethics; qualitative and quantitative research designs; sampling techniques; data collection, processing, and analysis; and writing and reporting research results.

    Prerequisite: CJFS 1120 and one course in statistics (MATH 1200 or QMBE 1310) with grades of C- or better

    Credits: 4

  
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    CJFS 3400 - Survey of Forensic Science


    Goals: To introduce the practice of forensic science and to recognize how physical evidence is identified and examined.

    Content: Roles and responsibilities of forensic scientists; the nature of physical evidence; evidence collection, analysis, interpretation and admissibility in court; expert testimony.

    Taught: Fall and Spring

    Prerequisite: CJFS 1120 with a grade of C- or better

    Credits: 4

  
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    CJFS 3410 - Crime Scene and Death Investigation


    Goals: Identify the role and responsibilities of a crime scene investigator. To develop skills in the investigation of crime scenes; to work individually and collaboratively to identify, collect, and preserve evidence; produce a thorough crime scene report, and discuss potential challenges posed by death scene investigation and complex crime scenes.

    Content: This course will provide students with the basic competencies required of a crime scene examiner. This course will focus on developing a consistent approach to the processing of a crime scene. During the class, emphasis will be given to aspects such as entering and securing the crime scene; documentation; note taking; searching for physical evidence; chain of custody; collection and packaging of evidence; crime scene safety and processing of evidence. Procedures will be emphasized to ensure that evidence is protected and recovered for future laboratory examination such as latent prints, trace evidence, impression evidence and biological materials in accordance with known standards. Mock crime scenes are incorporated into this course to facilitate student application of knowledge in practical casework. Crime scenes will also focus on the development of specialized skills and techniques, such as those needed to investigate deaths potentially caused by blunt force injury, gunshot wounds, sharp force injury, and various other mechanisms of homicide.

    Taught: Annually, spring

    Prerequisites: CJFS 3400

    Credits: 4

  
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    CJFS 3420 - Forensic Biology


    Goals: To develop skills in the analysis of biological evidence; and to understand the role of science in the legal system.

    Content: Properties of biological evidence; evidence collection procedures; analysis and interpretation of evidence; reporting analysis results; and admissibility of evidence and expert testimony.

    Taught: Annually

    Prerequisites: CJFS 3400 and BIOL 3060

    Credits: 2

  
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    CJFS 3430 - Forensic Document Examination


    Goals: To develop skills in the examination of questioned documents; and to understand the role of science in the legal system.

    Content: Properties of document evidence; evidence collection procedures; analysis and interpretation of evidence; reporting analysis results; and admissibility of evidence and expert testimony.

    Taught: Annually

    Prerequisites: CJFS 3400

    Credits: 2

  
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    CJFS 3440 - Forensic Fingerprint Examination


    Goals: To develop skills in the examination of fingerprints; and to understand the role of science in the legal system.

    Content: Properties of fingerprint evidence; evidence collection procedures; analysis and interpretation of evidence; reporting analysis results; and admissibility of evidence and expert testimony.

    Taught: Annually, spring

    Prerequisites: CJFS 3400

    Credits: 2

  
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    CJFS 3450 - Forensic Firearm and Toolmark Examination


    Goals: To develop skills in applying the techniques used by forensic scientists in examining firearms and toolmarks, and to understand the role of science in medico-legal and forensic contexts.

    Content: Course content will focus on the role of forensic firearm and toolmark examination in civil and criminal cases. Content specific to forensic firearm and toolmark examination will include properties of evidence, admissibility of evidence and expert testimony, evidence collection procedures, methods of evidence analyses, and interpretation and communication of results.

    Taught: Annually, fall

    Prerequisites: CJFS 3400

    Credits: 4

  
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    CJFS 3460 - Topics in Forensic Science


    Goals: To engage in an advanced study in a specialized topic in the field of forensic science.

    Content: An intensive study of a specific area of forensic science. Topics vary from semester to semester.

    Taught: One to three times per year

    Prerequisite: CJFS 3400 (grade of C- or better)

    Credits: 2

  
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    CJFS 3610 - Forensic Toxicology


    Goals: To develop knowledge of the principles and methods of analyzing human subject samples for alcohol and other drugs and interpreting alcohol and drugs test results.

    Content: Death investigation toxicology; human performance toxicology; forensic workplace drug testing; drug metabolism; pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics; analytical techniques; interpreting drug test results; expert witness testimony; working with attorneys.

    Taught: Annually, spring

    Prerequisite: CHEM 3450

    Credits: 4

  
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    CJFS 3700 - Policing in America


    Goals: The objectives for this course are for students to understand police organizations/operations from a social science perspective.

    Content: The course covers topics related to police conduct, community policing, police subculture, professionalization of the police, ethical decision making in law enforcement and evidence-based policing.

    Taught: Annually, fall

    Prerequisite: CJFS 1120 or LGST 1110, or instructor permission

    Credits: 4

  
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    CJFS 3710 - Criminal Law and Practice


    Goals: To acquaint the student with the theory and practice of substantive criminal law.

    Content: A study of the substantive aspects of criminal law, including traditional elements of crimes, statutory definitions, and judicial interpretations of specific crimes and motor vehicle offenses, as well as inchoate crimes, defenses to legal liability, and sentencing procedure.

    Taught: Annually, spring

    Prerequisite: CJFS 1120 or LGST 1110, or instructor permission

    Credits: 4

  
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    CJFS 3715 - Mental Illness in Criminal Justice


    Goals: To develop an understanding of mental illness within the criminal justice system by examining research, public policy, history, and contemporary issues.

    Content: Students will understand how serious mental illness interacts with policing, courts, and corrections. Topics include the relationship between mental illness and crime, the criminalization of mental illness, mental illness in jails and prisons, evidence based practices for working with mentally ill offenders, de-escalation techniques for police officers, and prevention and intervention policies.

    Taught: Annually, spring

    Prerequisite: CJFS 1120 or LGST 1110

    Credits: 4

  
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    CJFS 3720 - Constitutional Issues in Criminal Procedure


    Goals: To acquaint the student with the theory and practice of criminal procedural law.

    Content: An overview and critical examination of the procedural aspects of criminal law and issues relating to constitutional protections against unreasonable searches and seizures, unlawful gathering of incriminating evidence through interrogation and identification procedures, and the provision of legal counsel in criminal matters.

    Taught: Annually, fall

    Prerequisite: CJFS 1120 or LGST 1110, or instructor permission

    Credits: 4

  
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    CJFS 3730 - Victimology


    Goals: To introduce students to the field of victimology through research, theory, history, policy and exploration of victims’ roles in the criminal justice system and society.

    Content: This course examines research on victimization including trends and rates of occurrence, current theoretical explanations of victimization, the history and development of the crime victims’ rights movement in the United States, policies aimed at helping victims, and consequences of victimization for victims and society.

    Taught: Annually, fall

    Prerequisite: CJFS 1120 or LGST 1110 or PSY 1330 or SOC 1110, or instructor permission

    Credits: 4

  
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    CJFS 3740 - Courts and Sentencing


    Goals: To introduce students to the history and current practices of the American criminal court system through the exploration of empirical research and theoretical frameworks.

    Content: This course examines the role that the criminal court plays in society. It explores courtroom decision making from an interdisciplinary perspective, drawing on research and theory from criminological, sociological, and organizational perspectives. Specific topics include empirical research and theory on bail and pre-trial procedures, the roles and decisions of prosecutors, defense attorneys, judges, and juries, plea bargaining practices, sentencing guidelines, mandatory minimums and truth-in-sentencing reforms.

    Taught: Annually, spring

    Prerequisite: CJFS 1120 or LGST 1110, or instructor permission

    Credits: 4

  
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    CJFS 3750 - Theories of Criminal Behavior


    Goal: The objectives for this course are for students to understand the causes of crime and why individuals commit crimes.

    Content: The focus of this course are theories of crime and of criminal behavior and the contexts (individual and societal characteristics, family, and neighborhood) associated with crime and offending.

    Taught: Fall and spring

    Prerequisite: CJFS 1120 or SOC 1110 or PSY 1330

    Credits: 4

  
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    CJFS 3760 - Juvenile Delinquency/Juvenile Justice


    Goals: To acquaint the student with the history and inception of the juvenile court; the evolution of adolescence; understand, evaluate and apply theories of delinquency; and describe the organization of the juvenile justice system and intervention strategies.

    Content: Topics covered in this course include the historical development of the concept of delinquency, theories related to delinquent behavior, and how theories influence and impact the development of juvenile justice policy. The course will also cover the structure and operations of the juvenile justice system, and examine recent legal reforms and juvenile correctional strategies employed by professionals today.

    Taught: Annually, spring

    Prerequisite: CJFS 1120 or instructor permission.

    For CCJ majors, it is strongly encouraged that you complete CJFS 3750 prior to enrolling in this course.

    Note: This course is an approved elective for sociology and psychology majors.

    Credits: 4

  
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    CJFS 3770 - Punishment, Corrections and Society


    Goals: The objectives of this course are to provide students with an in-depth understanding of the issues and methods of punishment and social control used within American correctional practice and to review the empirical research assessing the effectiveness of correctional practice.

    Content: This course examines theories of punishment and asks questions such as “Why do we punish and how much? Is punishment a deterrent for future criminal offending behavior? What are current correctional, sentencing, and punishment techniques being used in the United States and do they lead to a more just society? The course will also cover theories of punishment, the structure and operations of the U.S jail, prison, and correction systems, and explore current correctional policies and their impact on individuals and society.

    Taught: Annually, fall

    Prerequisite: CJFS 1120 or LGST 1110 or PSY 1330 or SOC 1110 or SOCJ 1100

    Credits: 4

  
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    CJFS 3780 - International Crime


    Goals: The course introduces crime in a global context, including international crime, the avenues for bringing perpetrators of international crimes to justice, and transnational crime.

    Content: The course introduces crime in a global context, including international crime and the avenues for bringing perpetrators of international crimes to justice, as well as transnational crimes, including human smuggling and trafficking, the illegal drug trade, organized crime, cybercrime, piratry, and trade in illegal goods. Beyond this, we focus on inherently international (and contentious) issues in criminal justice including globalization, terrorism, drug trafficking, war crimes, human rights, and the International Criminal Court (ICC).

    Prerequisite: CJFS 1120 or GLOB 1910 or LGST 1110 or PSCI 1430 with a grade of C- or higher.

    Credits: 2

  
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    CJFS 3785 - International Criminal Justice


    Goals: This course introduces criminal justice administration (policing, judiciary, and corrections systems) in a comparative perspective.

    Content: This course presents an introduction to criminal justice systems in a global perspective. We compare criminal justice in the United States to countries around the world to understand the interconnections between culture, politics, crime, and the administration of justice. We focus on the three stages of the criminal justice system (police, courts, and corrections) and how these stages vary across nations.

    Prerequisite: CJFS 1120 or GLOB 1910 or LGST 1110 or PSCI 1430 with a grade of C- or higher.

    Credits: 2

  
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    CJFS 3800 - Inside-Out Prison Exchange


    Crosslisted: Also listed as CFST 3800, SOCJ 3800, and WGS 3800

    The Inside-Out prison exchange program brings incarcerated individuals and Hamline undergraduates together to take a course behind prison walls to investigate issues related to crime, justice, freedom, inequality, and other social justice issues. Both inside and outside students will read various texts and write response papers throughout the semester. Students will work together to complete a class project. The course will take place at a Minnesota Department of Corrections Institution. This course is open to all Hamline undergraduate students who meet the prerequisite requirements.

    Prerequisites: One of the following courses: CJFS 1120, CFST 1100, SOC 1110, SOCJ 1100, WSTD 1010, and at least sophomore standing. Additionally, all students must complete an essay and interview to obtain instructor approval.

    Note: The department offering the course varies by term. It may be offered under CFST, CJFS, SOCJ, and WSTD.

    Credits: 4

  
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    CJFS 3810 - Topics in Criminal Justice


    Goals: To engage in an advanced study in a specialized topic in the field of criminal justice.

    Content: An intensive study of a specific area of criminal justice. Topics vary from semester to semester. Recent examples: Investigating Criminal Cases, Case Management for Court-Ordered Populations.

    Taught: Once per year

    Prerequisite: CJFS 1120 with a grade of C- or better

    Credits: 4

  
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    CJFS 5400 - Professional Issues in Forensic Science


    Goals: To recognize challenges to forensic science examinations and professional issues facing forensic scientists.

    Content: Accuracy and reliability of forensic science techniques; key legal rulings on the admissibility of scientific evidence; quality management; ethics; expert testimony.

    Taught: Annually, spring

    Prerequisites: CJFS 3400 and one forensic science elective (grades of C- or better)

    Credits: 4

  
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    CJFS 5660 - Senior Capstone and Internship in CJFS


    Goals: To enable students to pursue internships and explore the connections between criminal justice and/or forensic science knowledge and skills and experiences in professional workplace settings.

    Content: An exploration and application of discipline specific concepts to professional workplace practices; independent research projects and frequent on-campus seminars are designed to connect academic and internship experiences.

    Taught: Fall and spring

    Prerequisites: CJFS 1120, CJFS 3750 OR CJFS 3400, and senior standing

    Note: The internship must be completed concurrently with the course. Students should contact the instructor well in advance of the beginning of the semester to discuss their internship placement site to assure prompt commencement of the internship. International students must connect with the GEC for CPT authorization prior to registering for this course and starting their internship.

    Credits: 4

  
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    CJFS 5670 - Forensic Psychology and the Law


    Goals: Students will assess the latest theory, research, and practice of forensic psychology in the criminal justice system.

    Content: This course examines the role that forensic psychology plays in the criminal justice system. Students will critically examine forensic psychology policy and procedure through a social scientific lens. Students will explore a variety of forensic psychology topics including assessment, expert testimony, psychopathy, the insanity defense, competency, lie detection, eyewitness identification, and sexual offenses.

    Taught: Annually, spring

    Prerequisite: CJFS 3750, LGST 1110, and PSY 1480 with grades of C- or better

    Credits: 4

  
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    CJFS 5790 - Crime Policy Evaluation


    Goals: The goal for this course is to cover “hot topic” crime programs and policies from a practitioner and research perspective. This course will be both writing and speaking intensive. By the end of the course, students will be able to describe and evaluate both the justification for use and efficacy of special criminal justice and crime policies using the crime policy evaluation hierarchy.

    Content: Topics covered include, but are not limited to: Supermax prisons, juvenile waiver and transfer laws, drug policy, sex offender laws, and prisoner reentry initiatives.

    Taught: Every other year

    Prerequisites: CJFS 1120, CJFS 3750, a statistics course (CJFS 1140, MATH 1200, PSY 1340, or QMBE 1310), and junior or senior standing, or instructor permission

    Credits: 4

  
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    COMM 1100 - Introduction to Communication Studies


    Goals: To introduce students to the field of communication studies by providing an overview of approaches to studying communication in a variety of contexts.

    Content: An examination of the research and theory related to the dynamics of human communication. The process of attributing and sharing meaning, the effects of nonverbal behavior on interpretation and meaning attribution, the factors influencing interpersonal, small group, organizational, intercultural, and media in the digital age.

    Taught: Every semester

    Prerequisites: None

    Credits: 4

  
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    COMM 1110 - Public Speaking


    Goals: To help students gain real-life skills in speaking in public, gain confidence, and enhance their ability to deliver oral presentations;  to help students achieve the ability to undertake the research process, reason, and effectively identify what needs to be said in a given situation as well as the best way to say it;  to practice the skills of critical listening, critical analysis of arguments, and effective advocacy that can enable students to become more engaged in effective and ethical public discourse.

    Content: Theories of communication in public settings;  factors influencing message creation, construction, and interpretation;  utilizing research and evidence in creating effective arguments;  adaptation to the communication situation and audience;  addressing the diversity of values and viewpoints held by audience members;  ethical issues in public communication;  factors influencing effective delivery;  stagefright.

    Taught: Every semester

    Prerequisites: None

    Credits: 4

  
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    COMM 1320 - Introduction to Critical Media Studies


    Goals: To introduce students to conceptual frameworks of critical media studies; to create savvy media consumers by teaching them to understand forces behind media institutions that influence the ways they create messages; to learn to construct and express oral arguments pertaining to media issues more effectively and more academically.

    Content: New media and old media, media theory, communications infrastructure, media ownership, media impact, media policy and law, media ethics.

    Taught: Annually

    Prerequisites: None

    Credits: 4

  
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    COMM 1650 - Argumentation and Advocacy


    Goals: To study argumentation theories, including historical perspectives and current approaches; to understand arguments as a method of inquiry and advocacy, and as a problem-solving tool; to consider the ethical implications of formal and informal argument; to increase skills in critical thinking, in evaluation of evidence and reasoning, in developing strategies for the invention of persuasive argument, in evaluating formal and informal argument, and in justifying argumentation choices. To learn to construct and express oral arguments effectively in a public setting.

    Content: Analysis of theories and strategies of argumentation; application of principles and theories of argumentation; emphasis on critical assessment of argumentation in a variety of contexts and media.

    Taught: Every semester

    Prerequisites: None

    Credits: 4

  
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    COMM 3300 - Communication Research Methods


    Goals: To introduce a range of research methods used in studying communication; to develop an understanding of the purposes of communication research; to learn how to design a research project; to identify strengths and limitations of various research methods; to develop an appreciation of ethical issues in research.

    Content: Various types of research methods, both qualitative and quantitative, such as experimental research, survey research, ethnographic research, textual analysis, content analysis, historical/critical research.

    Taught: Annually

    Prerequisite: COMM 1100 or instructor permission

    Note: This course must be completed by the end of the junior year to be eligible for departmental honors. It is also a prerequisite for the Senior Research Seminar (COMM 5900).

    Credits: 4

  
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    COMM 3320 - Media in the Digital Age


    Goals: To develop a capacity for strategic thinking and understanding of the creation, dissemination, consumption, and impact of mass media messages in the digital age.

    Content: Analysis of theoretical approaches to studying and understanding traditional and convergent mass media messages in the digital age. The course examines historical development, current trends in media and communication technology as well as legal and ethical issues that affect individuals, society, democracy and a global community.

    Taught: Annually

    Prerequisite: COMM 1100 or COMM 1320, or instructor permission

    Credits: 4

  
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    COMM 3360 - Interpersonal Communication


    Goals: To help students understand more about the ways communication functions in individual face-to-face interactions, including factors that influence interpretation, relationship development, and conflict management. Students have opportunities to examine their own individual communication interaction patterns in interpersonal situations.

    Content: Examination of communication and self-image, impression management, self-disclosure, verbal and nonverbal codes, listening, relationship development and maintenance,  conflict in face-to-face situations,  interpersonal interaction and social media, analysis of communication interactions. Attention is given to theoretical as well as practical applications.

    Taught: Annually

    Prerequisites: None

    Credits: 4

  
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    COMM 3380 - Small Group Communication


    Goals: To provide real-life experience in small task-oriented groups in order to examine communication interaction in small groups and teams; to gain an understanding of how group interactions and processes are influenced by communication, and how group interactions and processes in turn affect communication patterns; to gain an understanding of task issues as well as interpersonal relationships in groups and teams, and how communication affects both; to provide opportunities to examine individual communication interaction patterns.

    Content: Theories of communication as it functions in teams and small groups; problem-solving processes; phases of small-group interaction; development of norms, roles, group cohesiveness, climate, productivity, and leadership; analysis of the impact of power, status, conflict, and conformity on small-group and team interaction; pragmatic skills related to group presentations; methods to enhance group productivity.

    Taught: Every semester

    Prerequisite: COMM 1100 or junior/senior standing

    Credits: 4

  
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    COMM 3390 - Organizational Communication


    Goals: To introduce the role of communication in organizational settings, with particular emphasis upon examining organizational dynamics as communication processes; to introduce classic and contemporary organizational communication theoretical approaches; to gain skills in applying theoretical concepts to the investigation of communication issues in actual organizations; to examine processes of organizational communication, including culture, socialization, leadership, technological processes, and diversity management processes.

    Content: Organizational communication theories, approaches, perspectives, functions, and structures; organizational culture; communication processes in organizations; methods for conducting research in organizational settings.

    Taught: Annually

    Credits: 4

  
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    COMM 3420 - Media in Global Perspective


    Goals: To help students gain a theoretical and practical perspective on global mass media systems, both as national and international purveyors of information and culture. To examine and critically analyze the factors influencing media operations and content, including foreign policy, transnational media corporations, global civil society movement and digital media technology.

    Content:  Examination of social, cultural, political, technical, regulatory, economic, and linguistic factors that influence media systems around the world; examination of foreign policy, transnational media corporations, global civil society movement and digital media technology; analysis of national laws, ethics, and norms in relation to media systems, including patterns of import and export of media products, analysis of the relationship between media and culture.

    Taught: Annually

    Prerequisites: COMM 1100 or COMM 1320, or instructor permission

    Credits: 4

  
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    COMM 3460 - Intercultural Communication


    Goals: To study the nature of communication as it is affected by cultural and co-cultural variables; to become familiar with philosophies and approaches to the study of communication and diversity; to experience dynamics of intercultural communication; to examine the relationship between culture and perception, thought, language, and behavior; to examine how culture influences and plays a role in public and private communication interactions (e.g., interpersonal relationships, communication in small-group and organizational settings, argumentation, mass communication).

    Content: Philosophies and theories of intercultural communication; application of concepts and issues to actual experiences; discussion of the influence of culture on all aspects of communication; emphasis is on understanding the relationship of culture to communicative practices and meaning systems.

    Taught: Annually

    Prerequisite: COMM 1100 strongly recommended

    Credits: 4

  
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    COMM 3480 - Media and Global Environmental Conflicts


    Goals: This course examines the role news and popular media (e.g. advertising, micro-marketing, social networking such as web 2.0) play in setting agenda and constructing meanings of various issues in global environmental discourse. The students will learn to expand understanding in how language and image shape human perception about the natural world; to critically examine the structures and implications of environmental representation; to analyze the ways in which environmental issues are framed by different media; and to understand the complex relationship between economic development that fosters consumer culture and the environment.

    Content: The course is presented in the forms of both theoretical analysis and practical media writing. The coursework involves general reading and discussion on different stages of world development, social change, environmental impacts, and the global politics of sustainable development with a central focus on how mass media make meanings of these issues.

    Note: Student evaluation is based on class participation, discussion, examinations, essays and the student’s weblog production.

    Taught: Annually

    Prerequisite: COMM 1100 or COMM 1320

    Credits: 4

  
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    COMM 3560 - Communication in Conflict Situations


    Goals: To learn about the dynamics of communication interaction in conflict situations; to explore approaches to dealing with conflict, including examining the strengths and weaknesses associated with communication styles, tactics, strategies, uses and expressions of power, the impact of “face,” the impact of culture, and framing; to become familiar with and examine the role of third-party intervention; to develop greater awareness of the consequences associated with one’s own communicative choices in conflict situations.

    Content: The role that communication plays in conflict situations, the general principles of communication in conflict, including the way communities develop and share symbolic world views that may come into conflict with those held by different communities. Examination of approaches to dealing with conflicts, such as problem resolution approaches, mediation, and negotiation strategies. Students will apply the theoretical perspectives to individual interpersonal conflict situations as well as to contemporary societal conflicts.

    Taught: Alternate years

    Prerequisite: None

    Credits: 4

  
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    COMM 3670 - Gender, Communication, and Knowledge


    Goals: To increase awareness of the relationship of communication and gender; the portrayal of gender in public discourse; the influence of gender socialization in developing communicative behaviors and interpretive frames; and the implications of societal response to communication as it relates to gender.

    Content: Examination of research into gender differences and communication; examination of public messages as they influence perceptions of women and men; analysis of historical processes as they have influenced current perceptions of gender.

    Taught: Annually

    Prerequisite: COMM 1100 or WSTD 1010 strongly recommended

    Credits: 4

  
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    COMM 3960 - Field Experience Seminar


    Goals: To support and strengthen the academic component of internships and field experiences.

    Content: A focus on the workplace experience in the context of the liberal arts and communication research findings.

    Taught: Summer

    Prerequisite: Instructor permission

    Credits: 4

  
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    COMM 5900 - Senior Research Seminar


    Goals: To synthesize prior learning in the communication studies discipline through a senior capstone experience; to explore significant issues in communication studies through intensive individual research.

    Content: Individual students will engage in and present the results of major independent research projects that apply the knowledge and skills they have gained in the discipline. The seminar affords an opportunity for students to pursue individual interests in communication studies in depth.

    Taught: Annually

    Prerequisites: COMM 1100, COMM 3300, completion of at least 32 credits in the major, senior standing, and instructor permission

    Note: Course is restricted to senior majors only.

    Credits: 4

  
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    DMA 1100 - Introduction to Digital Media Arts


    Goals: To outfit students with a conceptual and technical foundation for making digital media art.

    Content: This course positions digital media arts at the multidisciplinary intersection of art and media. Combining hands-on projects with readings and discussions, students will consider key concepts of new media and question the impact of these media on contemporary culture through creative production. Students will spend the semester studying and developing art projects in a range of digital forms: web pages, raster images, motion graphics, 3d images and prints, and interactive games.

    Taught: Fall and spring

    Credits: 4

  
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    DMA 1120 - Fundamentals of Design


    Goals: To enable students to apply basic formal principles of visual design in the creation and analysis of simple 2d digital media projects. Enable students to apply design thinking strategies to develop an effective work process in design.

    Content: Through a series of hands-on projects utilizing a variety of materials and methods, this course introduces students to the fundamental concepts of visual design: picture plane, figure/ground relationships, scale and proportions, pattern, composition, value, color, methods for conveying time and spatial illusion. In addition to introducing formal design strategies, the course examines issues of content and the historical/cultural context in which works of art are produced.

    Taught: Fall and spring

    Credits: 4

  
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    DMA 1300 - Creative Coding


    Goals: To develop a basic ability to build dynamic, interactive, expressive applications using the Processing computer language. To develop an understanding of the unique artistic opportunities that computer programming enables.To develop basic proficiency in computational thinking skills - breaking down complex problems into smaller pieces, building and testing algorithms, abstracting specific solutions into more general ones, using data to represent real world phenomenon.

    Content: Creative Coding is a beginning level programming class for artists and makers. Students learn to make dynamic, interactive, expressive applications using Processing, a programming language designed for artists. The course is designed for complete beginners, no previous programming experience is required.  Students develop skills through a sequence of creative assignments; coursework culminates in a major final project and exhibition. The course will also highlight groundbreaking work of artists using these kinds of programming tools and examine how the computer enables new forms of expression.

    Credits: 4

  
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    DMA 1410 - Digital Photography I


    Crosslisted: Also listed as ART 1900

    Goals: To develop fundamental abilities in photography including mastering technical vocabulary, understanding of the photographic process, managing digital files, basic photo editing and adjustment, printing techniques.

    Content: Technical vocabulary and required skills, parts of the camera, understanding camera controls and options, framing a shot, shooting successfully in different conditions. Participants will also gain knowledge of the history of the development of photography and practice in analyzing and critiquing photographic images.

    Taught: Annually, fall and spring

    Note: Students with extensive experience in Digital Photography should contact the Department for a portfolio review to see if their work qualifies them for a 3000 level photography course.

    Credits: 4

  
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    DMA 1420 - Digital Video I


    Goals: To enable students to develop an informed and personal approach to making digital video art. To master contemporary production techniques. To develop and refine perceptive, expressive and critical skills.

    Content: This course is a hands-on workshop in the fundamentals of using digital video as an expressive time-based medium. By solving a series of creative challenges students will learn the basic properties of video form and master rudimentary technical skills required to shoot, edit, and finish HD video.

    Taught: Annually

    Note: Students with extensive video production experience should contact the Department for a portfolio review to see if their work qualifies them for a 3000 level video course.

    Credits: 4

  
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    DMA 1450 - Graphic Design I


    Goals: To develop basic skill sets and fundamental conceptual frameworks for both creating and analyzing graphic communications across a variety of communication uses.

    Content: The course covers the process of research, ideation, digital concept development and final execution to deliver design solutions that follow rules and trends found in the study of graphic design. Students will study how a page/screen is “read” by a viewer, theories of design and emerging trends in graphic communication.

    Taught: Annually

    Prerequisite: DMA 1120

    Credits: 4

  
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    DMA 1460 - Web Design I


    Goals: To develop basic technical skills and conceptual framework for creating engaging web sites using HTML and CSS.

    Content: Web Design is a project-based course covering an overview of internet operations, hand-coding pages with HTML5/CSS3, utilizing an editor, optimizing media for web use, managing site materials, applying visual design principles to web products, analyzing interactive design and usability. Students spend the semester building a website with industry standard tools.

    Taught: Annually

    Credits: 4

  
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    DMA 1470 - Animation I


    Goals: To develop basic skills in the creation of animated characters and environments sufficient to sustain a short narrative. To develop the critical and technical skills necessary to form and evaluate animated work for its abilities to sustain a narrative and/or critically communicate to an intended audience.

    Content: An overview of the development of digital animation as an artist’s tool, work flow processes in animation design and realization, software options and uses for digital animation, storyboard creation and constructing an animation sequence. Students will be working on a number of animation projects during the semester.

    Taught: Annually, spring

    Credits: 4

  
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    DMA 1480 - Digital Audio I


    Goals: To develop basic skills in the creation and critical analysis of digital audio production and playback.

    Content: The course provides basic skills in both field and studio audio recording techniques. Technical content includes operation of sound boards, microphone selection and placement, working with both spoken word and musical performances in live settings, and editing techniques and practices. The course also includes units on critical analysis of sound production, copyright issues, and the development of audio recording.

    Taught: Annually

    Credits: 4

  
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    DMA 1490 - Fundamentals of Making


    Goals: This course builds the foundation upon which emerging digital media artists will establish a meaningful and effective practice of ‘making.’ In this course, making is understood as the practice of creating hybridized digital media artworks with a strong do-it-yourself (DIY) spirit that incorporates research, prototyping, feedback, problem solving, and iteration. Students will employ digital and hybridized tools to engage with 3D and 4D forms, such as kinetics and interactivity, to create audio-visual artworks.

    Content: Students will gain fundamental electronics, programming, and design skills through breadboarding and soldering electronic circuits, interfacing sensors and actuators with microcontrollers, building multimedia software applications, and using digital fabrication to manufacture physical interfaces for their projects. Students will learn the fundamental terms, technologies, resources, and research practices necessary for developing novel and compelling digital artworks. Whenever possible, students will also work collaboratively with students in other classes, such as studio arts/sculpture.

    Taught: Annually

    Credits: 4

  
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    DMA 3410 - Digital Photography II


    Crosslisted: Also listed as ART 3900

    Goals: To build on the skills developed in DMA 1410 through more advanced camera operations, enhanced editing work (including Photoshop), understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of different file formats, advance printing and image manipulation work.

    Content: Camera control in manual operations under different conditions, managing technically complex shots, effectively using lenses and filters. Image adjustment in Photoshop. History of recent developments in digital photography. Tutorials in analyzing and critiquing photographic work.

    Taught: Alternate years

    Prerequisite: DMA 1410 (or ART 1900), grade of C- or better

    Credits: 4

  
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    DMA 3420 - Digital Video II


    Goals: Building on the fundamental concepts and skills learned in Digital Video I, the primary objective of this course is to strengthen expressive abilities and technical skills in video through the application of film production techniques. A secondary goal is to foster collaborative skills required for effective filmmaking practice.

    Content: Students further develop artistry and production skills by producing their own short films. Class topics cover all stages of production from concept to final mix including: idea generation, scriptwriting, pre-production planning, lighting, shooting, editing, sound mixing, output compression and distribution. In addition, students study short film form by watching, analyzing, and discussing a wide variety of short films. Film production is a collaborative endeavor and students will develop collaborative skills by working in small teams to realize film projects. The class will consist of detailed demonstrations, hands-on practice, projects, readings, lectures, screenings, and critiques.

    Taught: Alternate years

    Prerequisites: DMA 1420, grade of C- or better

    Credits: 4

  
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    DMA 3450 - Graphic Design II


    Goals: To build project development skills: idea generation, sketching, refinement, project planning and timely completion of projects. To refine graphic design software skills, develop the ability to evaluate design using advanced principles and proper industry vocabulary. To extend knowledge of the historical influence on design.

    Content: This is a studio-based project course in which students utilize their knowledge of design, typography, and production techniques to produce a portfolio of designed artifacts. The course combines seminar, critiques and lab production. It includes extensive development of design skills through critiques, practice articulating design concepts through peer evaluation, the application of effective design strategies and the study and discussion of design history.

    Taught: Alternate years

    Prerequisite: DMA 1450, grade of C- or better

    Credits: 4

  
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    DMA 3460 - Web Design II


    Goals: To enable students to integrate Javascript, HTML, CSS for control of visual appearance and interactivity of web pages and apply basic principles of interactive design.

    Content: This is a project-based course in which students learn to harness the full power of HTML5 through the integration of three web technologies: HTML, CSS and Javascript. By building highly interactive web experiences, students learn the fundamentals of controlling visual appearance of the web page through JavaScript programming.  In addition, the course explores the basic principles of interactive design.

    Taught: Alternate Years

    Prerequisite: DMA 1460 

    Credits: 4

  
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    DMA 3480 - Digital Audio II


    Goals: This course will provide students the fundamental skills necessary to engineer and produce all aspects of the motion picture soundtrack. Students will produce a series of audio post-production projects, culminating in a final project in which a complete, professional sound track is designed from the ground up.

    Content: Topics include production (location) sound, Foley recording and editing, dialog recording and editing, sound effects (SFX) design, sound design, automated dialog replacement (ADR), music editing, microphone and recording techniques, synchronization, working with clients, and production workflow. Special emphasis will be placed on sound design tools and techniques, including MIDI, synthesis, and sampling.

    Taught: Alternate years

    Prerequisite: DMA 1480, grade of C- or better

    Credits: 4

  
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    DMA 5420 - Digital Video III


    Goals: Building on the fundamental concepts and skills learned in Digital Video II, the primary objective of this course is to strengthen expressive abilities and technical skills through additional film production projects. A secondary goal is to foster collaborative skills required for effective filmmaking practice.

    Content: Students further develop artistry and production skills by producing their own short films. Class topics cover all stages of production from concept to final mix including: idea generation, scriptwriting, pre-production planning, lighting, shooting, editing, sound mixing, output compression and distribution. In addition, students study short film form by watching, analyzing, and discussing a wide variety of short films. Film production is a collaborative endeavor and students will develop collaborative skills by working in small teams to realize film projects. The class will consist of detailed demonstrations, hands-on practice, projects, readings, lectures, screenings, and critiques.

    Taught: Alternate years

    Prerequisite: DMA 3420, grade of C- or better

    Credits: 4

  
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    DMA 5450 - Graphic Design III


    Goals: To demonstrate and apply a professional understanding of formal principles, software skills, and project development skills: idea generation, sketching, refinement, project planning, and timely completion of projects. To build advanced projects in an environment of peer review and critique.

    Content: This is a studio-based project course in which students utilize their knowledge of design, typography, and production techniques to produce a portfolio of designed artifacts. The course combines seminar, critiques and lab production. It includes extensive development of design skills through critiques, practice articulating design concepts through peer evaluation, and the application of effective design strategies.

    Taught: Alternate years

    Prerequisite: DMA 3450, grade of C- or better

    Credits: 4

  
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    DMA 5480 - Digital Audio III


    Goals: Students will build upon knowledge gained in Digital Audio II to advance audio post-production experience, proficiency, and practice. This course will provide students the advanced skills necessary to engineer and produce all aspects of the motion picture soundtrack. Students will produce a series of audio post-production projects, culminating in a final project in which a complete, professional sound track is designed from the ground up. 

    Content: Students will work with the instructor to conceptualize and produce collaborative and independent audio projects. Topics include production (location) sound, Foley recording and editing, dialog recording and editing, sound effects (SFX) design, sound design, automated dialog replacement (ADR), music editing, microphone and recording techniques, mixing, and production workflow. Special emphasis will be placed on sound design tools and techniques, including MIDI, synthesis, and sampling.

    Taught: Alternate years

    Prerequisites: DMA 3480, grade of C- or better

    Credits: 4

  
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    DMA 5900 - Senior Seminar


    Goals: To integrate core formal principles, technical skills and critical analysis of digital media in the completion of a senior project and to present and reflect upon that work.

    Content: In this course each student synthesizes technical and critical learning in the discipline through the realization of a major media art project and its exhibition. On completion of the project, students compose a reflective analysis of the realized project and discuss their work with a faculty committee.

    Taught: Spring

    Prerequisites: DMA 1100 and the completion of a significant part of the coursework for the major. Open to DMA majors only.

    Credits: 4

  
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    ECON 1100 - Principles of Economics


    Goals: This is an introductory course in economics. The primary goal is to develop an understanding of the tools and approaches used by economists, and then apply that understanding to current economic issues. This will help you to interpret economic news and economic data while also forming your own opinions.

    Content: We will cover both microeconomics (investigating decisions by individuals and firms) and macroeconomics (examining the economy as a whole). We will also examine the role of government in domestic and international markets. The course will also provide a strong foundation for those of you who want to continue with additional study of economics.

    Credits: 4

  
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    ECON 1200 - Big Data & Social Issues


    Goals: The course has three principal learning objectives: 1) to introduce students to social science research on key social and economic issues, 2) to teach students how to analyze data using quantitative methods, and 3) to show students to how practitioners are using data to analyze social problems.

    Content: This course will show how “big data” can be used to understand and explore some of the most important social and economic problems of our time. The course will give students an introduction to research in applied economics and social science that does not require prior coursework in Economics or Statistics. Topics include equality of opportunity, education, health care, climate change, and crime. In the context of these topics, the course will also provide an introduction to basic statistical methods and data analysis techniques using R (statistical software).

    Credits: 4

  
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    ECON 1500 - Methods and Modeling for Economics, Finance, and Analytics


    Goals: To understand the basic modelling and methods essential for undergraduate students of economics or other quantitative business-oriented disciplines.

    Content: Preparation for students to structure and analyze quantitative problems, providing the mathematical foundation for future study of econometrics, economic theory, or other upper-level analytics topics. Main topics include linear equations, matrices, and nonlinear optimization.

    Taught: Fall term

    Note: This course is open to all students. Economics and business analytics students may not count both MATH 1170 and ECON 1500 toward the major or minor. If you have already taken MATH 1170 or its equivalent, you may wish to speak to an advisor or department chair before enrolling in this course.

    Credits: 4

  
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    ECON 3100 - Intermediate Economic Theory


    Goals: To deepen students’ understanding of economic theory, building on the foundation they received in introductory economics. Students will learn how to develop, analyze and interpret models of economic behavior using graphical, algebraic and calculus-based methods.

    Content: This course will examine classic theories of consumer and producer decision-making, in a variety of economic contexts. Constrained optimization, graphical analysis, and game theory methodology will be used to explore allocation decisions made by consumers, firms, and governmental units. These theories will also be used to understand macroeconomic outcomes, such as unemployment, inflation and economic growth.

    Taught: Spring term

    Prerequisites: ECON 1100, and Math 1170 or ECON 1500 with grades of C- or better

    Credits: 4

  
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    ECON 3200 - Judgement and Decision Making


    Crosslisted: Also listed as PSY 3200

    Goals: Students in this course will be able to articulate the history of Judgement and Decision Making (JDM) research, explain key JDM theories, and apply JDM theories to specific areas of human behavior using appropriate methodology from economics or psychology.

    Content: We make judgments and decisions on a daily basis: some are trivial, others consequential; some are made as individuals, others as part of a larger household or organization. How do humans arrive at judgments and decisions in varied contexts? This course provides an overview of the topics in judgment and decision making (JDM) under conditions of risk, uncertainty, interdependence, or bounded rationality. We will apply JDM theories to varied contexts (e.g., medical decision making, consumer behavior, discrimination, and gambling), explore the history of this field of study, and contrast methodological approaches used to study JDM in psychology and economics.

    Prerequisite: ECON 1100 or ECON 1310 or PSY 1330 (grade of C- or better)

    Credits: 4

  
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    ECON 3710 - Labor Economics


    Goals: To provide students a well-balanced presentation of models of labor economics, applications, policies, and major analytic areas within labor economics. This course will also address labor market issues with race and gender perspectives.

    Content: Labor market analysis, labor unions and collective bargaining, government and the labor market, theories of labor market discrimination, wage differentials, poverty and income inequalities, and race and gender issues of the labor market.

    Prerequisites: ECON 1100 and QMBE 1310 (or equivalent statistics course), with grades of C- or better, or consent of the instructor.

    Credits: 4

  
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    ECON 3720 - International Economic Development


    Goals: To gain understanding of the problems and issues of economic development and to examine and appraise the major prevailing approaches to those problems.

    Content: Developing as well as high-income market economy perspectives; concepts of growth and development; major contemporary approaches; diversity among the Third World countries; dualism; cultural factors; population, labor, migration and education; poverty and inequality; strategies for investment and structural transformations; international trade, investment and development; planning, control, and macroeconomic policies.

    Prerequisites: ECON 1100 and QMBE 1310 (or equivalent statistics course), with grades of C- or better, or consent of the instructor.

    Credits: 4

  
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    ECON 3730 - International Trade and Finance


    Goals: To acquaint students with the evolving patterns of trade and investments in the global economic environment and with the major issues confronting national and international institutions of trade and finance.

    Content: Topics covered include theories of foreign trade with perfect and imperfect competition. Trade policy issues, protectionism, and U.S. trade policies and its institutional settings. The effects of growth and factor mobility on trade, balance of payments, foreign exchange markets, foreign exchange regimes, foreign exchange determination, and economic policy in an open economy.

    Prerequisites: ECON 1100 and QMBE 1310 (or equivalent statistics course), with grades of C- or better, or consent of the instructor.

    Credits: 4

  
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    ECON 3740 - Economics of Public Finance


    Goals: To study the theoretical and empirical issues surrounding governmental decisions. Students will analyze and debate public finance topics and examine the implications of policy options for society.

    Content: This course focuses on governmental revenues, expenditures, debt-financing and related policy decisions. Effects of the budget and policy on income distribution, stabilization, efficiency and economic growth are also considered.

    Prerequisites: ECON 1100 with a grade of C- or better, or consent of the instructor

    Credits: 4

  
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    ECON 3750 - Behavioral and Experimental Economics


    Goals: To broaden the students’ understanding of economic theory by incorporating knowledge from other social sciences and by expanding traditional economic models to better understand and predict human behavior.

    Content: Evidence suggests that human beings often do not behave according to the strict rational-actor assumptions inherent in traditional economic theory. This new and growing field of economics seeks to improve our ability to predict and understand phenomena including altruism, trust, reciprocity, and loss-aversion. The course will incorporate economics experiments and game theory methods to examine human behavior.  These concepts will be applied to a wide range of contexts, from consumer or investor behavior to health care, dating, and procrastination.

    Taught: Alternate years

    Prerequisites: ECON 1100 and QMBE 1310 (or equivalent statistics course), with grades of C- or better, or consent of the instructor

    Credits: 4

  
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    ECON 3770 - Environmental Economics


    Goals: To introduce students to the study of environmental issues and resource use, applying economic perspectives and tools.

    Content: This course examines various environmental issues (e.g., pollution, climate change, energy sources) from an economic perspective. Topics include market failures, challenges of economic development, resource management and allocation, and public policy options. Particular attention is paid to cost-benefit analysis, as it is applied to environmental problems.

    Prerequisites: ECON 1100 and QMBE 1310 (or equivalent statistics course), with grades of C- or better, or consent of the instructor.

    Credits: 4

  
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    ECON 3860 - Junior Seminar in Economics


    Goals: To prepare students for the Senior Seminar in Economics, where they will complete an independent research project with theoretical and empirical components.

    Content: This course will guide the students through the development of an independent research proposal, including literature review, hypothesis construction and model development. Students will create a written proposal and deliver presentations.

    Taught: Spring term

    Prerequisite: ECON 1100 with a grade of C- or better

    Credits: 2

  
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    ECON 5820 - Econometrics


    Goals: To enable students to understand and use economic indicators, time series, and regression analysis in model building and forecasting.

    Content: Estimating model parameters, hypothesis testing, and interpreting economic data.

    Taught: Fall term

    Prerequisites: ECON 1100, QMBE 1100, QMBE 1310 or MATH 1200, and MATH 1170 or ECON 1500, with grades of C- or better

    Credits: 4

  
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    ECON 5860 - Senior Seminar Economics


    Goals: To develop and test economic models through in-depth, independent research in theoretical and applied economics.

    Content: Research methodology and recent analytical and theoretical approaches to questions on topics such as the environment, health care, industrial organization, international economics, labor, money and banking, regional and urban economics, and welfare economics. Students choose a research topic, review the literature, construct a theoretical model, and collect and analyze data for final presentations.

    Taught: Spring term

    Prerequisites: ECON 3100 and ECON 5820 (grades of C- or better), or consent of the instructor.

    Credits: 4

  
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    EDU 1150 - Schools and Society (with Lab)


    Goals: To understand the profession of teaching from historical, philosophical, sociological, and practical viewpoints. To understand the development of our public school systems and the role schools can play in a pluralistic society such as the U.S.

    Content: Important events and personalities that have shaped the public school system in the United States; theories of education; the major professional and political issues facing teachers, students, and parents, especially as related to standards and testing; school-based classroom observation and teacher assistance.

    Taught: Fall and spring terms

    Corequisite: Concurrent registration in EDU 1250 - Educational Psychology if pursuing teaching license

    Note: Students must concurrently register for a lecture and a corresponding 0-credit lab section of this course.

    The lab consists of a 20-hour required clinical in a local school. Students who have transferred in the equivalent course content without clinical experience should see the Department Chair to coordinate enrollment in a 1-credit Independent Study to earn the course equivalent.

    Credits: 4

 

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