2019-2020 Undergraduate Bulletin 
    
    Feb 22, 2020  
2019-2020 Undergraduate Bulletin

Courses


 
  
  •  

    PSY 5420 - Belief in the Brain



    Goals: To introduce students to the concept of human belief and doubt in philosophy, psychology, and cognitive neuroscience.  The course primarily aims to explore the differences of two theoretical belief models with emphasis on how each one of these belief models may shape our society.  This includes issues dealing with the right of free speech, mass communications, advertising, propaganda, lie detection, and religious beliefs.  Students will cultivate their own perspectives with cumulative essays and in class discussion, as well as improving lecture skills with multiple in class presentations.

    Content:  Wide-ranging perspectives on human belief: philosophical, cognitive science, and cognitive neuroscience; lesion method in cognitive neuroscience, prefrontal cortex functionality, cognitive science of religion, authoritarianism, dual-processing, cognitive dissonance.

    Prerequisite: PSY 3420 (grade of C- or better) and major status, or instructor permission

    Credits: 4

  
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    PSY 5440 - Childhood and Society



    Goals: To examine controversial issues in child development which have substantial implications for public and social policy. The topics examined will link development, education, and cultural practices from infancy through adolescence.

    Content: Specific topics vary by semester and will include topics of both historical relevance and contemporary debates within child development (e.g., adolescent risk behavior, child care, children and the law, developmental theory and educational practices, family diversity, media exposure, parenting styles, public health, poverty, and technology use).

    Prerequisites: PSY 3440 (grade of C- or better) and senior standing (with psychology major), or permission of the instructor

    Credits: 4

  
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    PSY 5600 - Aggression



    Goals: An in-depth analysis of aggressive behavior as addressed by social psychological research.

    Content: Variable from year to year.

    Prerequisites: PSY 3510 or PSY 3800 (grade of C- or better) and senior standing (with psychology major) or permission of the instructor

    Credits: 4

  
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    PSY 5700 - Clinical Psychology



    Goals: To introduce students to the field of clinical psychology as a science and a profession; to review theoretical models of psychopathology and intervention; to explore professional issues related to mental health services; to integrate, evaluate, and reflect on previous coursework related to mental health and mental illness within the framework of an advanced seminar in psychology.

    Content: Contemporary approaches to clinical psychology; theoretical and practical issues in clinical education, ethics, and intervention; individual topics selected by students.

    Prerequisites: PSY 3640 (grade of C- or better) and senior standing (with psychology major), or permission of the instructor

    Credits: 4

  
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    PSY 5720 - Applied Health Psychology



    Goals: This seminar is designed to examine the interrelationships between behavior, emotion, health and psychological disorders and dysfunction. Students will be introduced to the assessment, treatment and causes of physical and psychological health issues.

    Content: The role of the practicing psychologist in a medical setting will be discussed and how psychologists function in the context of health care settings will be a major focus of the course (ranging from ethics to assessment and treatment) and we will examine how they operate with other medical professionals. Emphasis will be on clinical intervention and assessment of physical and mental disorders in context.

    Prerequisites: PSY 1480 (grade of C- or better) and senior standing (with psychology major), or permission of the instructor

    Credits: 4

  
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    PSY 5750 - Positive Psychology



    Goals: To introduce students to the scientific study of positive characteristics, positive experiences, and positive institutions; to critically examine particular topics in positive psychology in depth; and to make connections between theory and practice in positive psychology.

    Content: Variable from session to session.

    Prerequisites: PSY 3350 (grade of C- or better) and senior standing with psychology major

    Credits: 4

  
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    QMBE 1310 - Statistics



    Goals: To acquaint students with major parametric and nonparametric statistical techniques.

    Content: Data organization, simple probability, and sampling distributions; estimation and hypothesis testing; regression and correlation; time series; selected non parametric tests.

    Prerequisites: None, though a basic understanding of algebra is expected. 

    Note: Credit will not be given for more than one statistics course (MATH 1200, PSY 1340, or QMBE 1310).

    Credits: 4

  
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    QMBE 1320 - Introduction to Business Analytics



    Goals: To introduce frequently used data analysis techniques, to develop the quantitative skills necessary to use them, and to apply the methods in business decision-making settings.

    Content: The course will cover decision-making frameworks as well as data capture, analysis and presentation techniques. Topics such as budgeting, forecasting and regression will be explored using Excel and other relevant software or analytical tools.

    Prerequisite: QMBE 1310 (or equivalent statistics course) with a grade of C- or better.

    Credits: 4

  
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    QMBE 3710 - Operations Management



    Goals: To introduce students to concepts, techniques, and tools related to the design, planning, quality assessment and control, and improvement of manufacturing and service operations.

    Content: Topics including process analysis, improvement, and productivity, quality management, supply management, and inventory management, and how these topics are integrated with high-level financial objectives. Class sessions involve explaining concepts, working examples, discussing cases and performing team projects.

    Prerequisite: MGMT 3100 (grade of C- or better) or consent of the instructor.

    Credits: 4

  
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    QMBE 3720 - Decision Science



    Goals: To introduce students to decision-making analysis, stressing problem formulation, analytical methods for solution, and use of computer models.

    Content: Decision theory, linear programming, simulation, and implementation.

    Prerequisites: QMBE 1320 and MGMT 3100 (grades of C- or better) or consent of the instructor.

    Credits: 4

  
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    QMBE 3730 - Advanced Business Analytics



    Goals: To enable students to utilize advanced mathematical models and data management techniques.

    Content: This course covers data management techniques utilizing database applications such as MS Access along with advanced data manipulation and spreadsheet techniques such as table lookup functions, linked spreadsheets, macros, and Visual Basic.

    Taught: Yearly, spring semester

    Prerequisite: QMBE 1320 (grade of C- or better)

    Credits: 4

  
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    QMBE 3740 - Data Mining



    Goals: Introduce students to data mining techniques and best practices.

    Content: This course includes classification, prediction, data reduction, and data visualization. Advanced regression, network and cluster analysis.

    Taught: Alternate Years

    Prerequisites: QMBE 1320 (grade of C- or better)

    Credits: 4

  
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    QMBE 3750 - Data Management and Communication



    Goals: To build a strong foundation in data organization, and management (i.e., “data wrangling”) as well as reporting, visualization, and communication to non-technical audiences.

    Content: Businesses today operate in a very complex environment, with more data available than ever before. Students will build skills in using data management and visualization tools (including SQL and Tableau), and consider approaches to professional data representation and communication.  

    Prerequisite: QMBE 1320 (grade C-or better)

    Credits: 4

  
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    REL 1100 - Introduction to Religion



    Goals: To examine general theories about religion and various dimensions of religion (e.g. the sacred, scriptures, ethics, practices, mysticism, etc.), to reflect on the role of religion in public life, and to appreciate various ways of being religious and non-religious.

    Content: Topics discussed include approaches to the interpretation of scriptures, religious ethics, different kinds of “religious lives,” the challenges of religious diversity, religion and violence, atheism, religious trends in America and the world, and the relationship of religion to politics, law, science, and feminism.  A number of the world’s religious traditions and thinkers will be introduced through texts, case studies, films and field trips.

    Taught: Every semester

    Credits: 4

  
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    REL 1140 - Women and Religion



    Goals: To introduce religious expressions of women and their role in religion; to analyze the roles religion plays in women’s lives; to explore ways women influence as well as rethink religious traditions and shape them.

    Content: Cross-cultural examination of how religions function in women’s lives and the leadership roles women take in religion; analysis of gender structures in religion; and examination of such concepts as spirituality, community, authority, relationship, and images of the divine. The specific religious traditions and the cultural contexts of the women may vary in different years.

    Taught: Alternate years

    Credits: 4

  
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    REL 1200 - Survey of the Old Testament/ Hebrew Bible



    Goals: To survey the Jewish Scriptures/Christian Old Testament in historical context, exploring both the material’s literary characteristics—such as narrative plot and theme, poetic form and rhetoric—and its key theological emphases—such as the concept of God and the mission and destiny of Israel.

    Content: Samples from the three main portions of the Old Testament: Pentateuch, Prophets, and Writings (Psalms and wisdom literature).

    Taught: Annually

    Credits: 4

  
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    REL 1220 - The New Testament



    Goals: To develop an acquaintance with the literary and theological characteristics of the New Testament, and to understand the process of its formation. A student should develop skill as an interpreter (exegete) of the biblical text.

    Content: The literature of the New Testament, using the methods of historical-critical analysis, answering questions such as: By whom written? To whom written? When written? Meaning to authors and to the Christian community to whom they were/are addressed?

    Taught: Annually

    Credits: 4

  
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    REL 1300 - God, Self, and World: An Introduction to Theology



    Goals: To introduce the student to theological language and argument through critical examination of historical and contemporary thinkers as well as schools of thought.

    Content: Close reading and discussion of theological texts that explore central Christian claims about the nature of God, Jesus Christ, creation, humanity, the church, sin, suffering, evil, and salvation. Special attention will be given to the role of gender as well as to Christianity relationship to other religious traditions.

    Taught: Annually

    Credits: 4

  
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    REL 1400 - Christian Ethics



    Goals: To provoke reflection on, and understanding of, the basis, nature, content, and consequences of Christian moral thinking. To appreciate the variety of viewpoints of moral issues within the Christian tradition and their relation to the larger society.

    Content: Close reading and discussion of various approaches to Christian ethics followed by analysis of selected moral issues such as war, euthanasia, abortion, homosexuality, and racism.

    Taught: Annually

    Credits: 4

  
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    REL 1500 - Introduction to Judaism



    Goals: To introduce students to the Jewish world by putting them in touch with authentic Jewish texts, experiences, values, and insights, and by enabling them to compare Judaism with their own ways of living and believing.

    Content: Analysis of the uniqueness and tragedy of Jewish history, issues of Jewish identity, the role of Jewish law in the life of the community.

    Taught: Annually

    Credits: 4

  
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    REL 1510 - Jewish Ethics



    Goals: To study the nature of the good in Judaism; to analyze such contemporary issues as war and peace, individual responsibility, sexuality, women’s issues, and related topics.

    Content: Historical context and authority, including Bible, Talmud, Responsa, and Codes; classic and modern religious literature; contemporary Jewish bioethics texts.

    Taught: Alternate years

    Credits: 4

  
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    REL 1520 - The World of Jesus



    Goals: To understand the social, cultural, and political realities that comprised the world of Jesus, and to see him as an embodiment of that milieu.

    Content: Movements in contemporary Judaism—Sadducees, Pharisees, Zealots, Essenes—as well as institutions like Temple, Torah, and Synagogue will be studied, along with the opportunities they presented to Jesus. Special emphasis will be placed on Jewish responses to Greek and Roman imperialism and culture, and to the ways in which these responses shaped Jesus’ environment.

    Credits: 4

  
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    REL 1560 - Islam and the Muslim World



    Goals: To gain an understanding of the history, texts, beliefs and practices of Islam. To explore the ways the commitment to the tradition is understood and expressed in the lives of Muslims from a variety of places and backgrounds. To gain an appreciation for both diversity and unity within the tradition.

    Content: Close reading of portions of the Qur’an and other sacred writings, such as the Hadith; survey of the history of Islam; exploration of Islamic philosophy, law, art and literature. Special topics will include an examination of Sufism, the mystical tradition, and an analysis of contemporary issues relating to Islamic politics, the tension between tradition and modernization, and the growth of Islam in America.

    Teaching Methods: Lecture, small and large group discussion, videos; possible field trips and guest lectures.

    Taught: Annually

    Credits: 4

  
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    REL 1620 - Religions of East Asia



    Goals: To provide an introduction to the religious traditions of China, Korea and Japan. To examine continuity and diversity within each tradition and among the various traditions. To explore how religious themes and values are expressed in texts, rituals, symbols, art and architecture.

    Content: We will look at both the indigenous religions of each culture (e.g. Chinese Daoism, Korean Shamanism, Japanese Shinto) as well as those traditions that all share in common (Confucianism and Buddhism). We will discuss beliefs and practices, major thinkers and texts, historical contexts, institutional developments and popular religious movements. Topics include Chinese cosmology, Zen meditation, Korean Christianity, religion and Communism, and Confucian capitalism in contemporary East Asia.

    Taught: Annually

    Credits: 4

  
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    REL 1630 - Religions of South Asia



    Goals: To provide an introduction the religious traditions of South Asia (India, Pakistan, Bangladesh). To examine continuity and diversity within each tradition and among the various traditions. To explore how religious themes and values are expressed in texts, rituals, symbols, music, art and architecture.

    Content: We will look at the Brahmanical, Jain, Buddhist, Hindu, Islamic and Sikh traditions. Topics will include yoga, renunciation, Hindu deities, caste and social structure, and women in Hinduism. The last part of the course will explore trends in the 19th and 20th century, during which the religious traditions of South Asia were connected with nationalism and the birth of modern India, Pakistan and Bangladesh. We will conclude by looking at the role that Hindu traditions, teachers and practices have played in modern America.

    Taught: Annually

    Credits: 4

  
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    REL 3000 - What is Religion? Great Thinkers and Multidisciplinary Perspectives in Religious Studies



    Goals: This course will investigate the following questions: What is religion? How do we define it? Is religion something that exists “out there” or is it a creation of the scholar’s imagination? What methods should be used to study religion? What theories best explain it? How has the field of religious studies evolved, and where might it be headed?

    Content: Students will be introduced to the major thinkers from multiple disciplines who have influenced the development of religious studies in the west. These will include psychologists, theologians, anthropologists, sociologists, philosophers, historians, as well as feminist approaches from several of these disciplines

    Taught: Spring semester

    Prerequisite: One previous religion course (grade of C- or better) or instructor approval

    Credits: 4

  
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    REL 3150 - Religion and Literature



    Goals: To show both how imaginative secular literature can be religious—e.g., communicate a religious vision, help shape one’s character and inform one’s deepest self-understanding, legitimate or de-legitimate social forms and practices—and how the study of such literature has become a key element in the field of religious studies.

    Content: The specific topic and genre will vary from year to year. The focus may be plays, novels, short stories, poetry, or auto/biography. It may range in scope from an exhaustive study of a single literary work (e.g., Melville’s Moby Dick), to the works of a single author (e.g., Margaret Atwood, Jon Hassler, Flannery O’Connor), to a comparison of different authors (e.g., C.S. Lewis and G.K. Chesterton, Dorothy Sayers and P. D. James). Or it may be thematically arranged: e.g., Jewish Stories of Wonder; The Poetry of Prayer (Donne, Herbert, Hopkins, Dickinson, Berryman); Love and the Novel: A Critique of Power; How We Die; Modern Apocalyptic Literature; or Living With the Land: An Ecology of Fiction.

    Taught: Annually

    Credits: 4

  
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    REL 3200 - Biblical Narrative: Old Testament/Hebrew Bible



    Goals: To study in depth some portion of the narrative literature of the Jewish Scriptures/Christian Old Testament, with special attention to the issue of relevance posed by the antiquity of the texts, and to the issues posed by a sacred “literature-in-translation.” Emphasis will be given to developing close reading skills, a working acquaintance with critical methods of biblical studies, and intercultural competence.

    Content: Course content may shift from year to year. It may focus on a large block of narrative, the Deuteronomic History (Joshua-2 Kings), for example, or on an individual book (e.g., Genesis), or on a piece of a book (e.g., the Jacob cycle). Alternatively, the course may adopt a thematic approach: e.g., “family, friend, and stranger,” “holy war and peace,” or yet other topics.

    Taught: Alternate years

    Prerequisites: REL 1200 or REL 1220, or permission of the instructor

    Credits: 4

  
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    REL 3210 - Biblical Poetry: Old Testament/Hebrew Bible



    Goals: To study in depth a selection of the poetic literature of Jewish Scripture/Christian Old Testament with particular attention to poetic form, function, and transformative power. Students will learn to recognize interpretations embedded in translations, will develop close-reading skills, and will be challenged to deepen their vision of the world and open the self to transformation.

    Content: Course content may vary from a sampling of psalms, prophetic oracles, and proverbial wisdom to a closer focus on a single book (e.g., Isaiah), or on a comparison-contrast of two books (e.g., Proverbs and Ecclesiastes), or on some specific theme (e.g., protest and praise).

    Taught: Alternate years

    Prerequisite: REL 1200 or REL 1220 or permission of the instructor

    Credits: 4

  
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    REL 3250 - Death and Dying



    Goals: This course will examine death and dying from a range of perspectives and multiple methodologies.

    Content: The texts we will read include a) philosophical and theological reflections on the meanings(s) of death, how we should live in the face of death, and the possibility and desirability of immortality; b) psychological analyses of death anxiety, grief, and mourning; c) anthropological and sociological examinations of death rituals, suicide, and institutions surrounding death; d) accounts from Confucian, Daoist, Buddhist, and Christian traditions about the nature of death and the after-life; and e) debates on controversial issues including euthanasia, war and pacifism, capital punishment and factory farming. We will also read literary treatments (short stories, poems, excerpts from novels) on many of these issues, and view films that focus on these topics.

    Taught: Alternate years

    Prerequisites: Any religion course

    Credits: 4

  
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    REL 3300 - Sex, Gender, and the Body in Ancient and Medieval Christianity



    Goals: To explore the development of Christian thought and practice in its relationship to bodies, gender, sexuality, and culture from the first century B.C.E. through the medieval period up to the Protestant Reformation.

    Content: Persecution of the early church, formation of teachings of bodies, gender, and sexuality, Augustine and Monasticism on sin and sexuality, medieval women mystics and the body’s relationship to salvation, Martin Luther, the Reformation, and the reaffirmation of sexuality.

    Taught: Alternate years

    Credits: 4

  
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    REL 3310 - Gender, Race, and the Body in Modern Christianity



    Goals: To understand the persons and movements within Christianity that contribute to an evolving and reforming understanding of faith, faith-based organizations, and social change movements, especially as they relate to issues of race and gender, and the body.

    Content: Protestant and Catholic Reformations, Enlightenment thinkers’ influence on religious thinkers and institutions, Christianity’s contribution to the creation of the concept of race, the slave trade and colonization, gender and religion in the United States, and understanding the global development of Christianity in the twentieth century and beyond as a tool of liberation of bodies.

    Taught: Alternate years

    Credits: 4

  
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    REL 3330 - Religious Thinkers Who Changed the World



    Goals: Students will engage in critical textual study of the work of a particular religious figure whose work has had significant influence in the world. Students will also study secondary literature that evaluates and builds on the thinker’s contribution to religious thought.

    Content: This course will focus on the life and thought of a major religious thinker like sixteenth century reformer Martin Luther or twentieth century philosopher and activist Abraham Joshua Heschel. Class work will also involve individual research on an aspect of the thinker’s life and thought that will culminate in a final research paper.

    Taught: Alternate years

    Prerequisite: Any 1000-level religion course

    Credits: 4

  
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    REL 3350 - Contemporary African-American Religious Thought



    Goals: To understand how race in America—particularly the Black/White relationship—impacts religious thought in America; to encourage greater sensitivity to the ways in which religion is inextricably bound to culture, to politics, to economics, to American society as a whole.

    Content: Pre-World War II to the present—from the non-violent, prophetic voices of Howard Thurman and Martin Luther King, Jr., through the turbulent late 1960s with Malcolm X and the rise of Black Power—the influence of the protest movements on the creation of Black Theology and subsequently, of womanist theology; and the more recent critiques of capitalism by Cornel West and others.

    Taught: Annually

    Credits: 4

  
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    REL 3390 - Christianity in an Age of Religious Diversity



    Goals: this course will investigate recent attempts by Christian scholars and practitioners to address how to think about, interact and live with people of other traditions. Students will leave the course with a critical understanding of the promise and the challenge of working from within a religious tradition to forge avenues of understanding and build relationships across traditions.

    Content: In an age of increasing religious diversity at the local, national, and international levels, it is imperative that religious traditions reflect on the following questions: How are we to think about the nature and meaning of religious diversity? What is the significance of my neighbor’s faith for mine? What does a commitment to my home tradition mean for how my community should relate to other religious communities that are now part of the fabric of life in our cities and neighborhoods? Taught in a seminar style, this course will explore these questions and more.

    Credits: 4

  
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    REL 3400 - Contemporary Issues in Christian Ethics



    Goals: To achieve a greater appreciation of the major approaches and sources utilized by contemporary Christian ethicists, and to apply that knowledge to in-depth research into one current ethical dilemma.

    Content: The influence of scripture, philosophy, social, and natural science on the shape of Christian ethics in relationship to specific ethical issues such as sexuality, health care, politics, environment, economics.

    Taught: Alternate years

    Credits: 4

  
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    REL 3430 - Feminist/Womanist Theologies



    Goals: To explore the traditional theological claims in light of feminist and womanist critiques and reformulations.

    Content: Close reading and discussion of a variety of feminist and womanist theological works, especially focused on how gender, race, and class have affected religious language and imagery regarding God, Christ, power, sin, love, and redemption.

    Taught: Alternate years

    Credits: 4

  
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    REL 3630 - Seminar in Buddhism



    Goals: To engage in an in-depth study of the Buddhist tradition, focusing on its origin in India, its development in Southeast Asia, East Asia, and Tibet, and the spread of Buddhism to America. We will look at both continuity and diversity within Buddhism, examining the different forms the tradition takes in various cultures and at the threads that run through all of them.

    Content: We will examine various facets of Buddhism—e.g. meditation, ritual, ethics, devotion—and different types of Buddhist lives—e.g. Monastic and lay, contemplative and activist. We will read both primary texts (e.g. Sutras) and modern secondary literature, and will examine Buddhist thought and practice at the “elite” level as well as the popular level. A number of sub-themes and questions will run through the course: How has each culture been shaped by Buddhism, and how has Buddhism been shaped by the various cultures? What has been the interaction of Buddhism with other aspects of culture, and with the sociopolitical sphere, in each country? Special topics include women in Buddhism, conceptions of Nirvana, the ethics of Karma, Buddhist-Christian Dialogue, and Buddhism in contemporary America.

    Taught: Alternate years

    Recommended: Previous religion course

    Credits: 4

  
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    REL 5000 - What is Religion? Great Thinkers and Multidisciplinary Perspectives in Religious Studies



    Goals: This course will investigate the following questions: What is religion? How do we define it? Is religion something that exists “out there” or is it a creation of the scholar’s imagination? What methods should be used to study religion? What theories best explain it? How has the field of religious studies evolved, and where might it be headed?

    Content: Students will be introduced to the major thinkers from multiple disciplines who have influenced the development of religious studies in the west. These will include psychologists, theologians, anthropologists, sociologists, philosophers, historians, as well as feminist approaches from several of these disciplines.

    Taught: Fall term

    Prerequisite: Declared religion major and junior or senior status, or instructor permission

    Credits: 4

  
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    REL 5900 - Religion Colloquium



    Goals: This course brings together student majors, minors, and faculty members for the presentation and discussion of scholarly work in religion and examines the concept of vocation in a way that helps students reflect on their lives after college and on the process of finding meaningful work and discerning a calling.

    Content: Scholarly work by students, faculty members and visiting scholars; texts that explore the concept of vocation; and guest speakers and panels discussing issues related to work, careers, calling and elements that constitute a meaningful life.

    Taught: Annually

    Note: Two semesters of Colloquium are required for majors, and one semester is required for minors.

    Credits: 1

  
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    SOC 1110 - Introduction to Sociological Thinking



    Goals: To introduce students to the basic sociological concepts. To show how these concepts are used to analyze society. To increase our knowledge of how society is organized and operates. To encourage creative and critical thinking.

    Content: Study of culture, socialization, social institutions such as the family, religion, and government, race, gender, social class, and social change.

    Taught: Annually, fall, winter and spring terms.

    Credits: 4

  
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    SOC 1120 - Social Issues



    Goals: To gain a thorough understanding of a specific social issue and its impact on society.

    Content: The social issues selected will vary with the instructor; for example poverty, stratification, disabilities, etc. See the Course Listing for a given term for that course’s focus.

    Taught: Annually

    Credits: 4

  
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    SOC 1200 - Sociological Practice



    Goals: In this gateway seminar, students explore the discipline of sociology and engage in further discovery about what it means to employ a sociological perspective. The goal of this course is to help sociology majors successfully navigate their undergraduate education and prepare for advanced study in the field and/or their career. Ideally, students will take this course in their sophomore year. Transfer students will complete the course during their first year at Hamline.

    Content: Students will learn about the sociology department and major including resources and responsibilities of the major, internships, careers in sociology, and the role and value of public sociology. Students will review the core concepts (e.g., the sociological imagination), theories (e.g., structural functionalism), and methods (e.g., survey research) to which they were introduced in their introductory course. Students will learn how to formulate a research question, prepare an annotated bibliography, and consider how theory and methodology inform one’s work, whether theoretical or applied. In addition, students may conduct mini-methodology assignments, considering the appropriateness of method to question.

    Taught: Annually, spring term

    Prerequisite: SOC 1110 with a grade of C- or better

    Credits: 4

  
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    SOC 3330 - Sociology of Gender



    Goals: To understand and evaluate gender as a form of social structure and the consequences that structure holds for individuals and society. To understand gender as a social, rather than purely biological, construct.

    Content: Covers a variety of topics including the social construction of sex and gender, biological explanations of gender difference, and  a selection of contemporary issues in gender studies including intersex, transgender, and masculinities.

    Taught: Annually, fall term

    Prerequisite: SOC 1110 

    Credits: 4

  
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    SOC 3350 - Race, Racisms, and Racialization



    Goals: To develop a deep and nuanced understanding of the causes and consequences of the system(s) of racial categorization that exist in the contemporary United States.

    Content: Among other things, course content will privilege the historical process that gave rise to the current racial order, the ideologies that justify it, and the racial inequalities and ideologies that are the products of that order.

    Taught: Annually

    Prerequisite: SOC 1110 or CJFS 1120

    Credits: 4

  
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    SOC 3390 - Social Psychology



    Goals: To provide an overview of sociological social psychology, specifically the perspective of symbolic interaction. To understand how we become social beings and how, through our everyday interactions with one another, we create and re-create both ourselves and the social world in which we live.

    Content: The course will begin with a comparison of sociological and psychological theories of social psychology. We will then turn to symbolic interaction with topics that include meaning and symbols as human creations, language and cognition, impression management, the self, and the social construction of reality.

    Taught: Periodically

    Prerequisite: SOC 1110

    Credits: 4

  
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    SOC 3440 - Urban Sociology



    Goals: To explore the advent and growth of cities, the key organizations and concerns of everyday urban life, and the movement of people into and out of cities as well as regional shifts in the distribution of America’s population.

    Content: Urban and suburban domination of American life, the way in which the distribution of power has influenced the shape of cities, gentrification, the rise and fall of the “Southern Rim,” the factors that make cities desirable places to live, the various political and social problems which affect all cities and the possible remedies for these problems.

    Taught: Periodically

    Prerequisite: SOC 1110

    Credits: 4

  
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    SOC 3530 - Political Sociology



    Goals: To analyze the distribution of power in society. To explore the role of the state and the ways the key institutions of society affect the potential stability of a social system.

    Content: An overview of the field of political sociology and an examination of the reigning political ideologies in American society. The variety of available political ideologies, their dissemination, acceptance or rejection, significance of work, and movements for social change.

    Taught: Annually

    Prerequisite: SOC 1110

    Credits: 4

  
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    SOC 3700 - Medicine, Morality, and Mortality



    Goals: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

    1) describe the socialization experiences of students in medical school;
    2) identify and describe historical shifts regarding the place and practice of medicine in American society;
    3) describe patient-doctor interactions and experiences in various clinical settings;
    4) compare and contrast health and illness across social differences including race, socio-economic status, and gender;
    5) articulate key ethical issues in medicine including the case of organ transplantation;
    6) comprehend some of the complexities of medical practice, such as the role of patient compliance, surgical risk, and the anatomy of hope.

    Content: This course explores the social worlds of medicine. Topics include the process of becoming a doctor, the history of medicine, patient and doctor experiences, inequities in access to health care, organ transplantation, medical complications, and the anatomy of hope. Using literature, film, text, and guest speakers, we will examine the roles of doctors, patients, and the institution of medicine in a social exploration of health, illness, and healing.

    Taught: Periodically

    Prerequisite: SOC 1110

    Credits: 4

  
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    SOC 3930 - Social Research Methods



    Goals: To learn how to design and implement a research project. To become familiar with limits and appropriateness of various qualitative and quantitative research methods.

    Content: Various types of research methods such as field research, content analysis, and survey.

    Taught: Annually, spring term

    Prerequisites: SOC 1110 and SOC 1200 with grades of C- or better

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    SOC 3950 - Critical Social Theory



    Goals: To introduce students to sociological theories and to develop a scholarly sensitivity that is guided and shaped by critical concepts, ideas, and theories. Students will learn that understanding social reality is controversial and complicated.

    Content: In order to teach students a sociological way of “thinking” and a critical examination of social issues, the course draws on the works of past and present sociologists.

    Taught: Annually, fall term

    Prerequisites: SOC 1110 and SOC 1200 with grades of C- or better

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    SOC 5330 - Sexualities



    Goals: To understand and evaluate sexuality as a form of social structure and the consequences that structure holds for individuals and society. To understand sexuality as a social, rather than purely biological, construct.

    Content: The course will cover a variety of topics, providing a structural analysis of sexuality. Topics include social construction of sexuality, the history of sexuality in America, sexuality and religion, medicine, law, family, commerce, and education. 

    Taught: Annually, spring term

    Prerequisites: SOC 1110 and SOC 3330

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    SOC 5930 - Ethnography: Methods for Sociological Storytelling



    Goals: To learn how individual people’s stories can be analyzed for their social meaning; to learn about the place of ethnographic methods within sociology, as well as the advantages and limitations of these methods; to learn how to document others, as well as oneself, in images, sounds, and words using ethnographic methods; to learn about the relationship between theory and method, and how to apply theory to ethnographic data collection and writing; to learn how to write sociological stories based upon empirical documentation, using different narrative strategies, to various types of audiences.

    Content: This is a course about the stories that constitute people’s everyday lives and the sociological significance of documenting and writing about these life stories. In this course, students will learn to recognize how people’s everyday stories matter, and how these stories can be used to understand the social dynamics of community, the relationship between individuals and communities, institutional power, and social injustice. Students will learn about the methodological techniques social scientists use to collect, analyze, and write about these real-life stories, and they will use this knowledge to conduct their own original ethnographic research project. Course texts include social scientific forms of writing, as well as documentary films, photographs, and online audio and visual texts.

    Taught: Alternate years, spring term

    Prerequisite: SOC 1110 (grade of C- or better) and junior or senior standing, or instructor permission

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    SOC 5960 - Senior Seminar and Internship



    Goals: To synthesize the diverse sociology courses taken during the course of the major. To discuss the discipline of sociology—its major issues and debates, its applications, and its occupational relevance through completion of a 120-hour internship.

    Content: Completion of an internship fulfills the Hamline Plan LEAP requirement.

    Taught: Annually, fall and spring terms

    Prerequisites: SOC 1110, SOC 1200, SOC 3930, and SOC 3950 with grades of C- or better. Instructor signature required.

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    SOCJ 1100 - Introduction to Issues in Social Justice



    Goals: This course will introduce students to major streams of social justice thought, including historical social justice movements, theoretical problems having to do with social equality, personal freedom, access to social resources, marginalization, and stigmatization, and the ways in which communities respond to these issues.

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    SOCJ 3200 - Sexuality, Gender Identity, and the Law



    Goals: To provide students with an overview of the way U.S. federal and state law regulates sexuality and gender identity, and related aspects of social behavior. In particular, to examine the way that the law provides different rights, privileges, and responsibilities dependent upon one’s sexual orientation and/or gender identity. To further one’s understanding of the relationship between the law, as part of the public sphere, and sexuality and gender identity, which are often understood as predominantly a part of the private sphere.

    Content: Topical areas may include, but are not limited to, the conceptualization of sexual orientation and gender identity, historical trends, Constitutional law, employment, marriage, health care, military policy, law enforcement, and hate crime legislation.

    Prerequisites: None

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    SOCJ 3280 - Shelter for All



    Goals: Students will learn about homelessness through the dynamic interplay between theory and practice.

    Content: Through service-learning, speakers, and critical articles, students will examine the lived realities of homelessness, investigate its root causes, and identify responses and solutions. Students are required to complete 20 hours of service-learning at community agencies.

    Taught: Winter term.

    Prerequisites: None

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    SOCJ 5900 - Social Justice Capstone



    Goals: This course will permit major students to integrate theory, knowledge, and practical experience gained in their major using a series of readings, fieldwork experiences, and a major project.

    Prerequisite: SOCJ 1100

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    SPAN 1110 - Beginning Spanish I



    Goals: To introduce students with little or no previous training in the language to the basic grammar and vocabulary necessary for a variety of common activities.

    Content: Practical communication in such areas as greetings, descriptions, social and family life, food and restaurant needs, daily routines, the weather and the seasons, cultural values and leisure activities, machismo and feminism; occasional lectures concerning relevant aspects of Hispanic and Latino lives.

    Taught: Annually

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    SPAN 1120 - Beginning Spanish II



    Goals: To introduce students with little or no previous training in the language to the basic grammar and vocabulary necessary for a variety of common activities.

    Content: Practical communication in such areas as greetings, descriptions, social and family life, food and restaurant needs, daily routines, the weather and the seasons, cultural values and leisure activities, machismo and feminism; occasional lectures concerning relevant aspects of Hispanic and Latino lives.

    Taught: Annually

    Recommended prerequisite: SPAN 1110 or equivalent

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    SPAN 3210 - Intermediate Spanish I



    Goals: To review and strengthen fundamental concepts. To increase writing and speaking skills. To develop an active vocabulary and improve pronunciation. To foster awareness and knowledge of Hispanic cultures and civilizations.

    Content: Intensive review of the indicative mood, including the perfect and progressive tenses, and an introduction to the forms and uses of the subjunctive. Vocabulary building, including idiomatic phrases and readings to illustrate grammatical usage and introduce Hispanic topics. Classroom conversation and small group discussion.

    Taught: Annually

    Recommended prerequisite: SPAN 1120 or equivalent

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    SPAN 3220 - Intermediate Spanish II



    Goals: To develop skills in using compound tenses and the subjunctive in conversation and in writing. To increase vocabulary and fluency through extensive reading, writing, and conversation. Emphasis is given to self-correction and to paragraph-length speech.

    Content: A comprehensive refinement of the use of all tenses, with emphasis on the subjunctive. Reading and discussion of short stories and articles to build vocabulary and facilitate oral communication, and explore different aspects of Latino culture. Compositions and some translation.

    Taught: Annually

    Recommended prerequisite: SPAN 3210 or equivalent

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    SPAN 3350 - Advanced Communication in Spanish



    Goals: To refine skills and attain near-native proficiency in pronunciation and in understanding native speakers.

    Content: Concentrated practice with word and sound variations used by native speakers; an analysis of idiomatic material vital to understanding normal conversation; an awareness of the importance of gestures, speech patterns, personal space and body language; and sensitivity to the interplay of language and society as well as the impact of Spanish on English.

    Taught: Periodically

    Recommended prerequisite: SPAN 3220 or equivalent

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    SPAN 3500 - Introduction to Spanish for the Health Professional



    Goals: To become familiar with the specific Spanish vocabulary used in the healthcare field; to review Spanish grammar structures that provide the foundation for knowing how to use that vocabulary to create complete thoughts that accurately express information to or ask questions of a Spanish speaking patient; to learn about volunteer and job opportunities and requirements for employment as a translator or interpreter in hospitals and clinics that serve the Latino population in the Twin Cities.

    Content: This course is designed around a specialized and intensive amount of vocabulary study using various resources. Various readings and internet searching will be done to explore different medical practices in the United States and in Latin America, and to research the different job opportunities. This course requires a service learning experience in which students are involved in the community where they are exposed to Spanish speaking patients. 

    Taught: Periodically in fall or summer

    Prerequisite: Intermediate level of Spanish (SPAN 3210 and 3220 are recommended)

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    SPAN 3600 - Hablemos de cine



    Goals: The primary goal is to strengthen the advanced-intermediate student’s listening and speaking skills in preparation for 5000-level coursework. Secondary goals include introducing students to the questions and methodologies of film criticism and developing their ability to critique films on the level of narrative and as expressions of Spanish/Latin American culture and society. 

    Content: Students will view 6-7 films from different parts of the Spanish-speaking world so as to improve their listening skills, particularly their ability to identify and understand regional accents and idiomatic expressions. Oral (and some written) assignments include comprehension exercises, plot summaries and analyses, research presentations, debates, role-playing and a final, in-depth critical review. Significant emphasis on vocabulary building, pronunciation and the confidence and skill needed to speak in longer, more complex sentences. The course is conducted entirely in Spanish, although some films are screened with English subtitles.

    Prerequisite: SPAN 3220 or equivalent

    Note: This course is not intended for native Spanish speakers.

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    SPAN 3900 - Advanced Conversation and Composition



    Goals: To teach students advanced aspects of oral and written expression in Spanish.

    Content: Oral expression, expository and creative writing, syntax, stylistics and idiomatic usage. Some introduction to advanced translation into Spanish.

    Taught: Annually

    Prerequisite: SPAN 3350 or SPAN 3600

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    SPAN 3910 - Spanish for the Professional



    Goals: To provide the student with a working knowledge of the Spanish language and Latino culture as related to the bilingual workplace of the United States and its counterpart abroad.

    Content: Work in such technical fields as health care and medicine, education and communication, law enforcement, social services and, in particular, business. Social and cultural issues are also emphasized. Pursuit of individual interests in specific career areas is encouraged. Strong emphasis is placed on relevant cultural issues.

    Taught: Annually

    Prerequisite: SPAN 3350 or SPAN 3600

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    SPAN 5200 - Spanish-English Translation



    Goals: To learn how theories, especially about culture, frame the way a translator or interpreter renders a text and reflect on how these influences condition your own approach to translation; to improve your knowledge of the grammar, vocabulary and semantics of English and Spanish; to learn about employment as a translator or interpreter; and to complete your own significant, independent Spanish/English translation project for the Hamline Plan Q.

    Content: Most learning in this course takes place through the following three means: 1. Textbook lessons and in-class peer review of homework translation exercises; 2. Learning about translation through classes dedicated to contemporary news stories about words, culture and meaning; to visits from local translators and interpreters; and to presentations about translation history and theory; 3. Your independent translation project. Each student will do short and longer oral presentations in Spanish about their translation project. The translation project includes a reflective essay and a bibliography.

    Taught: Periodically

    Prerequisite: Advanced level of Spanish (SPAN 3350, 3900, a 5000-level course, or study abroad in Spanish are recommended)

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    SPAN 5300 - La cultura popular en América Latina



    Goals: To engage in the collaborative and interdisciplinary study of various forms of popular culture in Latin America (festivals, music, foods, television, sports, etc.). To appreciate how both the Humanities and the Social Sciences can help us understand the social, historical, political, economic, and aesthetic dimensions of cultural practices. To improve one’s spoken Spanish through class discussion and formal presentations on a research topic.

    Content: In the first half of the semester we learn how popular culture is defined and studied, and through readings, lectures, and class discussion we examine a range of popular Latin American cultural figures and practices. By mid-semester students will have formed working groups and chosen study topics, which they will research individually and collaboratively for several weeks. Finally, in a graduated series of oral presentations, students will teach classes on the popular culture genre they researched (e.g., comic books), and will lead us in interpreting a specific example of that genre (e.g., the Chilean comic book Condorito). Although some course readings are in English, all lectures, writing assignments, exams and presentations will be in Spanish.

    Taught: Alternate years

    Recommended prerequisite: SPAN 3900 or 3910

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    SPAN 5400 - Borderlands



    Goals: To explore the Hispanic experience in the territories now comprised by the United States through literature written primarily in Spanish by Hispanic writers. Our exploration will focus on the contrasting experiences of Hispanics in the U.S. who are either native to this land, immigrants, or exiles. We will delve into how these contrasting experiences articulate with the intersecting issues of gender, race, class and nationality. For this we will need to understand, for example, the importance iconic female figures such as La Llorona, la Malinche, and la Virgen de Guadalupe have for Hispanic communities inside and outside the U.S. Other culturally relevant symbols, stereotypes, and tropes will also come into play. Ultimately, through readings and film viewing, we will attempt to interpret and understand the cross-cultural Borderlands experiences, bringing into sharp relief the meaning that border and frontier have from the Hispanic perspective.

    Content: En otra voz: Antología de la literatura hispana de los Estados Unidos, N. Kanellos, ed. Readings in Spanish and English from various well-known and little-known Spanish and Hispanic writers from the time of first contact to the present day. Other reading material provided through Blackboard. Relevant films. Graded material includes tests, oral presentations and a final paper.

    Taught: Periodically

    Recommended prerequisite: SPAN 3900 or equivalent

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    SPAN 5580 - Golden Age of Spanish Literature



    Goals: To acquaint the student with Imperial Spain and its most productive and creative literary period. Major contributions are made to western culture: Cervantes writes the first European novel (El Quixote), Tirso writes the first Don Juan drama, Santa Teresa confronts the Catholic Church with quiet mysticism, and social protest comes from street urchins like Lazarillo de Tormes as the picaresque tradition begins. The major focus is on Golden Age plays by Lope de Vega, Tirso de Molina, and Calderon de la Barca. Films of some plays are shown.

    Content: Plays from the Golden Age which deal with honor, free will, cloak-and-dagger intrigue and history; establishment of a national theatre; mystical prose and poetry; picaresque novels.

    Taught: Periodically

    Recommended prerequisite: SPAN 3900 or 3910, or equivalent

    Note: All coursework done in Spanish.

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    SPAN 5610 - The Generation of 1898



    Goals: To understand the impact of Spain’s defeat by the United States in 1898, and how that defeat caused a generation of Spanish authors to re-examine traditional values and beliefs and initiate a renewal and change in Spanish letters and philosophy.

    Content: A selection of texts including novels, short stories, essays, drama, and poetry by authors such as Azorin, Unamuno, Valle-Inclan, Machado, Baroja, and Ortega y Gassett. Excerpts from scholarly works on political and literary history. This intellectually vibrant literary movement led to innovation and enrichment, to a reassessment of Spain’s past and present, and it molded Spain into the country that it is today.

    Taught: Periodically

    Recommended prerequisite: SPAN 3900 or 3910, or equivalent

    Note: All coursework done in Spanish.

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    SPAN 5680 - Spanish Culture and Civilization



    Goals: This course is designed to give a comprehensive view of Spain and to provide students with a global knowledge of the different and diverse expressions of contemporary Spanish culture. The goal is to introduce students to the diverse realities of Spain through its history, geography, visual arts, politics, sociology and music, as well as its people, languages, traditions and daily life and customs. Spanish Culture and Civilization also presents new and current perspectives regarding Spain and its role in the European Union.

    Content: Different aspects of modern Spanish culture will be presented to the class through textbooks, contemporary movies, literary works, newspapers and magazine articles. In addition to expanding students’ cultural knowledge, this course works to develop students’ writing, reading, listening and speaking skills. Students are asked to form opinions on issues, defend their beliefs, and research and explore course topics independently.

    Taught: Periodically

    Recommended prerequisite: SPAN 3900 or 3910, or equivalent

    Note: All coursework done in Spanish.

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    SPAN 5800 - Latin American Novel and Short Story



    Goals: To expose the student to the development from realism to magical realism in Latin American novels and short stories, to analyze the importance of the historical reality of the Mexican Revolution in literature, and to examine machismo and hembrismo in the culture and how they are reflected in literature.

    Content: Through literature, students move north with the troops of Pancho Villa (Los de abajo), experience life in a machodominated pueblo where the dead speak (Pedro Paramo), examine choices that made a revolutionary into a politically powerful cacique in our modern world (La muerte de Artemio Cruz), observe the gender specific “painted woman” and “suffering mother” in relation to the macho male, and understand the impact that Mexican attitudes and customs have had on the United States.

    Taught: Alternate years

    Recommended prerequisite: SPAN 3900 or 3910, or equivalent

    Note: All coursework done in Spanish.

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    SPAN 5810 - Modern Latin American Fiction



    Goals: To explore different literary movements in the 20th century such as indigenismo, regionalismo, la novela psicologica, la vanguardia, lo real maravilloso, and feminismo; to seek connections between literary aesthetics and sociopolitical forces in Latin America; to develop through practice our ability to analyze, discuss, and write about art.

    Content: Primary texts: original works of Latin American fiction. Secondary texts: historical, biographical, and analytical readings. Authors vary from year to year. Course may occasionally focus on one or more themes, such as women writers, the regional novel, exile literature, or others.

    Taught: Alternate years

    Recommended prerequisite: SPAN 3900 or 3910, or equivalent

    Note: All coursework done in Spanish.

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    THTR 1010 - Production Experience (Category I)



    Goals: To engage the student in a range of production activities to develop communication abilities and technical skills required in the performing arts.

    Content: Stage management, board operation, and running crew for a mainstage show.

    Credits: 0.5

  
  •  

    THTR 1120 - Introduction to Theatre



    Goals: To introduce students to the art of theatre production. To gain an understanding of both the facets of theatre production as well as theatre’s role in society and community. To develop critical skills in analysis of dramatic text and performance review. 

    Content: Exploration of dramatic aesthetics and theory applicable to theatre. An overview of theatre arts which includes historical and socio-political survey of audience relationships to theatre and theatre-making. 

    This course is intended for the general student and required of all majors and minors.

    Taught: Each semester

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    THTR 1130 - Dance I



    Goals: To demonstrate an understanding of basic modern and jazz dance techniques through proper warm-up, the performance of across-the-floor combinations, a sensibility to music and/or rhythmic structures, and proper use and alignment of the body in terms of mechanical functioning. To acquire an awareness of movement relative to the use of space, time, and weight. To participate in structured improvisation as a vehicle for individual movement expression. To develop an understanding and awareness of modern and jazz dance as a performance art. To acquire an understanding of dance relative to its historical, social, and cultural contexts.

    Content: An introduction to modern and jazz dance technique. Performance of fundamental elements which comprise warm-ups, center floor sequences and combinations, and across-the-floor combinations. Basic elements of dance composition and improvisation.

    Taught: Each semester.

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    THTR 1140 - Creating Through Movement



    Goals: To explore creativity through a hybrid of dance and physical theater.  The course will  develop students’ technical skills, strength, flexibility, endurance and coordination using dance technique to explore rhythm and movement phrasing as well as introduce different techniques to increase kinesthetic awareness such as Yoga, improvisation and Laban Movement Analysis (LMA).

    Content: The course is designed to create an atmosphere that encourages students to become aware of feelings and images which shape the creative process. Students will explore the process of collective and personal creation and develop skills to create performance pieces that communicate ideas and expresses oneself.

    Taught: Annually

    Prerequisite: None - open to any student who is interested in exploring ideas through movement.

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    THTR 1150 - Yoga



    Goals: To improve body mechanics; develop mental focus and control; reinforce positive body image and language; and introduce yoga philosophy and experiential anatomy.

    Content: Work with structural alignment, flexibility and strength technique to improve body mechanics and injury prevention through yoga poses; examination of how yoga philosophy relates to day-to-day living through written material and written reflections.

    Taught: Alternate years.

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    THTR 1180 - Introduction to Film Studies



    Goals: This introductory course invites students to develop a comprehensive vocabulary and set of methodologies for the critical analysis of narrative film.

    Content: Landmark films and theoretical paradigms will be discussed along with significant trends in technology, production and reception.

    Taught: Fall term

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    THTR 1230 - Acting Fundamentals



    Goals: To introduce the uninitiated student to the basic principles of acting training: physical discipline, vocal control, individual expression, and intellectual/emotional exploration of the role. 

    Content: An active, participation-based course, students should expect to participate in a variety of beginning level acting training techniques such as textual analysis, voice and breathing techniques, improvisation, group exercises, monologue development and/or scene performance. No prior experience necessary.

    Taught: Each semester

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    THTR 1235 - Acting I



    Goals: To build on prior training and acting experience. To establish a shared performance vocabulary employed in further acting courses as well as in department production work.

    Content: The first class in the performance training sequence in the theatre major/minor. With focused work, geared towards students with prior acting training, experience, and/or interest, students engage in various acting methodologies. Students will engage in textual analysis in partnered or group scene work, audition preparation, and/or group exercises. Intended for majors, minors, and those with specific interest and/or experience in acting. 

    Taught: Spring term

    Prerequisite: Departmental approval required

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    THTR 1420 - Technical Theatre



    Goals: To introduce the theories and practical skills of technical production in theatre. To develop a basis for further work in theatrical design and to qualify the student for theatrical production work.

    Content: Materials, methods, and planning skills used in scenery, lighting, costumes, and properties. Projects in basic drafting, computer-aided design, construction, electricity, and electronics.

    Taught: Annually.

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    THTR 1450 - Drawing for the Theatre



    Goal: Beginning drawing class especially intended for students interested in theatre design.

    Content: The course covers basic principles of light and shadow, drawing the human form, fabric illustration and the techniques of working in pencil, marker and watercolor.

    Taught: Winter, alternate years

    Note: Students intending to take Costume Design or interested in fashion illustration are encouraged to take this course prior to taking Costume Design.

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    THTR 3010 - Production Experience (Category II)



    Goals: To engage the student in a range of production activities to develop communication abilities and technical skills required in the performing arts.

    Content: Directing, designing, and performing in a mainstage show.

    Credits: 0.5

  
  •  

    THTR 3120 - Analyzing the Dramatic Text



    Goals: To develop a strong foundation in script analysis with an emphasis on practical application through assignments geared to exercise the student’s ability to engage the dramatic text from a performance, a design, and a historiographic perspective.

    Content: Seven plays covering major historical periods and genres—including a focus on a variety of dramaturgical approaches—will be analyzed through close reading and experiential activities.

    Taught: Annually.

    Prerequisite: THTR 1120 or permission of the instructor.

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    THTR 3150 - Topics in Theatre History



    Goals: To study the broad and diverse history and literature of the theatre through special topics determined by genre, theme, and historical significance.

    Content: Topics may include Musical Theatre History, Theatre and Military Combat: From the Greco-Persian Wars to Current Conflicts in Afghanistan and the Middle East, Queer Identities on Stage: Then and Now, Experimental Visions: Off-Broadway and Off-Off-Broadway, etc.

    Prerequisite: None; however, THTR 1120 is recommended

    Note: Students may register for this course more than once for different topics.

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    THTR 3160 - The Modern Stage: 1870 to the Present



    Goals: To become familiar with the broad and diverse history and literature of the theatre over the last 150 years; the practical theories of acting, design and directing; the latest research in dramatic criticism; and the ways in which the study of theatre encourages cross-disciplinary thinking. 

    Content: Representative texts from 1870 to the contemporary moment with special focus on women, people of color, and LGBTQ theatre artists.

    Taught: Spring term

    Prerequisite: None, though THTR 1120 is recommended

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    THTR 3180 - Topics in Film Studies



    Goals: To explore in some depth a specific film genre.

    Content: Landmark genres and theoretical writings will be discussed along with significant trends in technology, production, and reception.

    Taught: Alternate years

    Prerequisite: None, though THTR 1180 is highly recommended

    Note: Students may register for this course more than once for different topics.

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    THTR 3210 - Movement for Actors



    Goals: To improve physical communication through gesture, body language, and movement. Students will also develop critical analysis skills.

    Content: Physical training in different somatic modalities including Feldenkrais, Laban Movement Analysis, dance, and yoga, which will explore the unique relationship between physical movement and text.

    Taught: Periodically.

    Prerequisite: THTR 1230.

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    THTR 3230 - Acting II



    Goals: Building on Acting I, this course is designed to further deepen understanding and mastery of the techniques of acting and to help prepare students for working in the field.

    Content: Intermediate level acting training focused on script analysis and application in engaged scene study. Students will perform in a variety of scenes, from a variety of performance genres and time periods.

    Taught: Annually

    Prerequisites: THTR 1230 or 1235, and THTR 3210

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    THTR 3410 - Stage Makeup



    Goals: To learn the techniques, theory, and application of theatrical makeup. To develop a working knowledge of materials and methods essential to use of principal types of theatrical makeup.

    Content: Makeup design and application in relation to character development and the overall production concept. The course focuses on advanced paint techniques and prosthetics.

    Taught: Alternate Years.

    Prerequisite: THTR 1420 or permission of instructor

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    THTR 3440 - Scene and Lighting Design



    Goals: To develop an awareness of the principles and techniques of the scene and lighting designer’s art. To qualify the student with appropriate skills for work as a beginning  designer.

    Content: Script analysis, concept development, visual research, and the use of design elements in the service of coherent and unified production. An exploration of the variety of design styles and the development of rendering, drafting (construction and light plot), collage, and model making skills.

    Taught: Alternate years

    Prerequisite: THTR 1420 (grade of C- or better) or instructor permission

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    THTR 3450 - Costume Design



    Goals: To introduce principles and practices in the design and execution of costumes for the stage. To prepare the beginning costume designer.

    Content: Script and visual research and use of design principles to create costumes appropriate to both individual character and the production as a whole. Summary of development of western dress, figure drawing, rendering skills, and research methods together with the nature and decoration of materials, pattern development, draping, assembly, and finishing methods.

    Taught: Alternate years.

    Prerequisite: THTR 1420 or instructor permission.

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    THTR 3700 - Children’s Theatre



    Goals: To provide a combined study of the theories and practical processes involved in creating and presenting theatre for children.

    Content: Participants for the course are selected by audition to prepare and tour a participation theatre play for children. In addition to the rehearsal and performance components of the course, there are units of study in script analysis, the development of theatre for children, types of theatre for children, performing for and with children, and an introduction to the roles that theatre can play in an educational setting.

    Taught: Annually, winter term.

    Prerequisite: Course participants must be cast in the touring children’s play.

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    THTR 3750 - Creative Drama and Creative Dance for the Classroom Teacher



    Goals: To introduce the theories and methods of developing successful lessons in creative drama and creative dance for the classroom teacher. 

    Content: Theories, history and evolution of creative drama and creative dance as a subject area. Methods and considerations in planning lessons for different age and ability groups. Resources for the classroom teacher. Ways to integrate creative drama and creative dance with different subject areas. 

    Taught: Periodically in summer term

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    THTR 3800 - Dance Ensemble



    Goal: To provide performance experience in contemporary concert dance. To learn modern and jazz technique and repertoire work from professional choreographers in the Twin Cities area and explore the choreographic process. Students will perform two concerts during the academic year.

    Content: Intermediate and advanced modern and jazz technique will be taught which will be comprised of warm ups; strength training; yoga; center floor sequences; across floor combinations; and partnering techniques. Emphasis will be placed on rehearsals for development of professional and student dance works.

    Taught: Annually. This is a two credit class that may be repeated.

    Prerequisite: Fall audition.

    Credits: 2

  
  •  

    THTR 5160 - Special Topics in Theatre Studies



    Goals: The critical study of a specific historical movement, theatre company, and/or theatre artist.

    Content: Intensive analysis of texts (both written, performance, and historical texts) in their cultural context. Topics will vary.

    Taught: Alternate years.

    Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing, or permission of the instructor.

    Credits: 4

  
  •  

    THTR 5400 - Managing the Performing Arts



    Goals: To introduce the student to the economic and administrative issues that confront a performing arts organization. To explore the methods, materials, and policies used by successful managers in preserving their organizations.

    Content: Units of study on organizational development, staffing procedures, fundraising systems, accounting methods, publicity techniques, and audience development.

    Taught: Alternate years.

    Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing.

    Credits: 4

 

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